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Did Victor Frankenstein Learn His Lesson | Cách Hồi Sinh Người Chết Đáng Sợ Thế Nào Review Phim Quái Vật Victor Frankenstein The 51 Detailed Answer

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Victor, a learned man who never learns the right lessons (even as he accepts the weight of his mistakes), represents intelligence without depth, morality without feeling, and ambition without foresight.There he learns about modern science and, within a few years, masters all that his professors have to teach him. He becomes fascinated with the “secret of life,” discovers it, and brings a hideous monster to life.Finally, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Walton, Victor, and The Monster teach three life lessons: Don’t get caught up to complete an idea, don’t let your emotions get the best of you, be appreciative of loved ones and people you care about because you might not have them forever.

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Victor’s last words : did he learn his lesson? -Frankenstein

Victor d learn his lesson! He learnt that his intelligence and power does not give him the authority to make divine judgement, and that a …

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Date Published: 11/29/2021

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The Lesson to Learn from Victor Frankenstein’s Story

Since the beginning of his existence, man has embarked on an endless pursuit of self improvement, domination, and most tragically, forbden knowledge.

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Date Published: 8/19/2021

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Life Lessons In Frankenstein – 781 Words – Bartleby.com

The amount of time he put in was extraordinary, but the project d not … However, one irrefutable lesson lies with Victor Frankenstein and his studies.

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Date Published: 11/12/2021

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The Lesson Of Frankenstein’s Lessons From Frankenstein

The creature never learned how to love, creating a heartless killer who, even after telling Victor his story, is hated, leading to the death of everyone …

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Date Published: 6/22/2022

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A Lesson From Frankenstein – ST112 A Fall 2018

Much like Victor’s creation of Frankenstein, Larry Page and Sergey … to Victor’s character and his experiences creating Frankenstein.

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Summary and Analysis Chapter 4 – Frankenstein – CliffsNotes

Victor admonishes his listener by saying “Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the aquirement of knowledge and how …

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What does Frankenstein learn throughout the course of the …

In conclusion, Victor Frankenstein makes a series of bad decisions that result in the deaths of his brother, William, Justine, Henry Clerval, and Elizabeth. It …

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What does Victor Frankenstein learn?

There he learns about modern science and, within a few years, masters all that his professors have to teach him. He becomes fascinated with the “secret of life,” discovers it, and brings a hideous monster to life.

What is the most important lesson the creature learns in Frankenstein?

Finally, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Walton, Victor, and The Monster teach three life lessons: Don’t get caught up to complete an idea, don’t let your emotions get the best of you, be appreciative of loved ones and people you care about because you might not have them forever.

Does Victor Frankenstein redeem himself?

He had a chance to redeem himself to the Monster and he promised him he would create a companion for him and again he denies him that right as well. Victor spends months creating a companion for the creature and once he was almost finished he “tore to pieces” the Monsters companion.

How does Victor view learning and education?

Victor Frankenstein’s education was, as he put it, “never forced,” and beyond his basic education he endeavors to learn all he can about the science of Natural Philosophy.

Does Frankenstein learn his mistake?

Does Frankenstein learn from his mistake in creating the Monster? In the days leading up to his death, Frankenstein regrets that he will die before destroying the Monster, revealing that he understands that creating the Monster was a mistake.

What did Victor learn at the end?

Conclusion: Victor did learn his lesson! He learnt that his intelligence and power does not give him the authority to make divine judgement, and that a selfish and careless life led by ambition is ruinous and miserable.

Does Frankenstein have a moral?

Shelley’s novel teaches that there can be morality without religion and that human beings will still develop values. The significance of this moral message is one that speaks to the collective human experience. Frankenstein offers a guiding compass that points each person to their own moral responsibility.

What did the creature learn from lives?

He learns of man’s cruel history of war in “Lives”, of man’s melancholic nature in “Sorrows of Werter” and the noble thoughts of man in “Paradise Lost”.

What does the creature learn from Victor’s journal?

The monster reads some books, eager to learn more. He found pages from Victor’s journal in his pocket, and discovered the truth behind his creation he is dismayed by these discoveries and decides to reveal himself to the cottagers, starting with the blind De Lacey first while Felix, Agatha & Safie are away.

How has Victor changed by the end of Frankenstein?

By the end of the story, Victor loses all his humanity due to his desire for revenge. The monster killed everyone the scientist loved, making the wrath even worse. Detailed answer: At the end of Frankenstein, Victor becomes angry at the monster because he destroys the scientist’s life.

Who is the true villain in Frankenstein?

If the Monster is the true protagonist of the novel, Frankenstein is his antagonist. Frankenstein directly thwarts the Monster’s goal of human connection by refusing to sympathize with the Monster himself and refusing to create a companion for him.

What happens to Victor at the end of the novel?

At the end of Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein dies wishing that he could destroy the Monster he created. The Monster visits Frankenstein’s body. He tells Walton that he regrets the murders he has committed and that he intends to commit suicide.

How did the monster gain knowledge?

Through the knowledge he acquired from spying in on the Felix family, he gained the understanding that his grotesque look doomed him to be marginalized within human society; therefore, his understanding of human history destined himself to be a monster.

What is the theme of knowledge in Frankenstein?

The pursuit of knowledge is at the heart of Frankenstein, as Victor attempts to surge beyond accepted human limits and access the secret of life. Likewise, Robert Walton attempts to surpass previous human explorations by endeavoring to reach the North Pole.

What is the role of knowledge and education in Frankenstein?

In Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein (1818), Shelley shows her audience that while acquiring knowledge leads to survival for the Creature and power for Victor Frankenstein, the path to obtain this knowledge leads to the destruction of one’s self.

What is Victor Frankenstein’s goal?

Victor Frankenstein is the protagonist of Frankenstein. His goal is to achieve something great and morally good, which will secure him a lasting reputation. In pursuit of this goal, he creates the Monster, but his pursuit of his goal also causes his conflict with the Monster.

What is Victor’s ambition in Frankenstein?

Victor’s ambition knows no bounds as he sets out to create life at any expense. He makes himself ill in the pursuit of his goals and puts achieving this ambition before the health and happiness of both himself and his family. It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn.

How does Victor change from childhood to adulthood?

How does Victor change from childhood to adulthood? When he is young, he is optimistic and driven by love. As an adult, he is afraid and broken.

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What becomes Victor’s obsession?

Victor becomes obsessed with the idea of creating the human form and acts upon it. Immediately after creating the monster, Victor falls into a depression and fear. He leaves the university and returns home to his family, only to find tragedy there.

Washington Independent Review of Books

“I was expecting this reception,” is all Monster can say after being verbally accosted by his creator, Victor Frankenstein. The two have met on Montanvert. Both have a score to settle.

It’s been two years since Victor has laid eyes on the being he created. Victor feels nothing but rage, because the wretch (as he calls him) has murdered his little brother. By the end of the story, Monster will have killed everyone Victor loves: his brother, his best friend, his wife.

But Monster’s rage is understandable, too. Moments after being brought to life, his creator rejects him and leaves the laboratory. New, and barely conscious, Monster stumbles into Victor’s bedchamber (where Victor has fallen into a fitful sleep) and watches his “father” until he awakens.

Monster smiles and reaches out. Victor flees the apartment, leaving his creation once more, this time to wander out alone into the Swiss countryside. Monster is confused, helpless, and in pain. He sits by a stream and weeps. What he wants more than anything is human connection, but when people encounter him, they run away or resort to physical attack.

And therein lies the central psychological question of Frankenstein: Who is the real monster?

To grapple with this question, we must sort our baggage. Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was an instant hit upon publication in 1818, but contemporary readers are more likely to have been influenced by the 1931 movie starring Boris Karloff. Though dangerous, the movie-monster’s childlike disposition inspires our sympathy. It’s this monster we think of, with his lumbering gait and square-head, not the watery yellow eyes and decaying skin of Shelley’s original.

The monster from the novel is both far worse and far better than popular imagination conceived: His aforementioned skin covers only a portion of his muscles and arteries; he is much larger and more agile than the average man, scaling mountainsides in mere minutes, enduring cold, harsh climates on less food than his human counterparts. (For comic relief, he’s vegetarian.)

He reads Milton’s Paradise Lost and Plutarch’s Lives with ease. He’s sentient and articulate, and counter to our empathic interpretations of him, he understands the principles of morality but kills members of Victor’s family anyway for revenge.

If Shelley had thoughts of morality, they were surely of a different variety than what we think of today. It’s been long established by scholars that she stitched together themes from foundational works (Greek mythology, Genesis, Paradise Lost, Shakespeare, Faust, and others) which were meant to repel in their unified, refurbished form.

Monster, whom the ambitious Victor constructs of various dead-body parts, is Shelley’s metaphor for the intrusions of objective methods into artistic theory. She wrote the novel as a warning: Allow creative beauty to retain its mystery. (She also wrote the novel as a challenge, but that’s a different essay.)

Nearly 200 years later, the debate about whether beauty can be measured continues, but not with Frankenstein. Today, popular and academic interpretations coalesce largely around Victor as the abandoning parent — and Monster as the faultless, traumatized child — a naked clue to our Freudian heritage and its parent-blaming spinoffs. Pushed further, a contemporary reading of the novel inflames our dread in the postcolonial era, the understanding that heinous acts are produced, reproduced, and catching; that trauma lives on, and responsibility, we tell ourselves, flows back through time.

Now, an adult-child, Monster confronts Victor on Montanvert. Monster believes — as we all have in desperate moments — that a bargain with his offender might heal old wounds. He begs Victor, “Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous.”

But what will make Monster happy? A beloved, of course. In exchange, Monster promises to “quit the neighbourhood of man” with his new companion, never to bother anyone again.

Victor agrees and begins creating the female monster but grows increasingly tormented by moral questions: What if the monsters rampage around the Earth killing people? In a chilling fit of trepidation, Victor rips she-Monster to pieces. Monster retaliates by murdering Victor’s best friend, Henry, and vows to continue the bloodshed until Victor is as lonely and miserable as he, threatening, “I shall be with you on your wedding-night.”

Monster, an intelligent, empathetic being, fails to rise above the revenge cycle, even with a clear understanding of virtue. In his own words: “To be a great and virtuous man appeared the highest honour that can befall a sensitive being; to be base and vicious, as many on record have been, appeared the lowest degradation, a condition more abject than that of the blind mole or harmless worm.”

Gleaning lessons from the books he reads is one thing, but Monster is fertile enough to apply these lessons via introspection: “Who was I? What was I? Whence did I come? What was my destination?” He quests for meaning even as he intends to forge it in the darkest of places. Monster represents depth without morality and feeling without responsibility.

Meanwhile, Monster’s philosophical (albeit disturbing) capabilities dwarf Victor’s superficial, one-track mind. Consider what Victor says, years before, about Henry’s study of languages: “I did not, like him, attempt a critical knowledge of their dialects, for I did not contemplate making any other use of them than temporary amusement.”

Victor’s reductive thinking leads him to believe life is nothing more than a collection of body parts plus energy. When he proves himself right by creating Monster, he’s horrified to the core. But why does the result of Victor’s work disturb him so much after he’s been obsessively pursuing it (ignoring family and friends in the process) for years?

The answer is simple: He doesn’t have self-knowledge. Victor, a learned man who never learns the right lessons (even as he accepts the weight of his mistakes), represents intelligence without depth, morality without feeling, and ambition without foresight.

For this reader, the true horror of the novel lies in Monster’s heinous victimhood, in his inability to let go of an unworthy father. Monster sacrifices his fine nature to have the full attention of Victor, who in turn vows to hunt Monster to the ends of the Earth in order to destroy him.

This obsessive pursuit makes Victor into a better and more complete companion than Monster could have ever envisioned. And who among us, at one time or another, hasn’t wished for such a singular and unremitting interest from the men who created us?

Dorothy Reno is a senior review editor and columnist for the Washington Independent Review of Books. Her short fiction has been published in literary journals such as Prairie Fire, FREEFALL, and Red Tuque Books. She lives in Tbilisi, (former republic of) Georgia. She would love to hear your thoughts on Frankenstein in the comments section of this article. Please join Dorothy in reading Moby-Dick, which will be the subject of her next column.

Like what we do? Click here to support the nonprofit Independent!

Frankenstein: Victor Frankenstein

Victor’s life story is at the heart of Frankenstein. A young Swiss boy, he grows up in Geneva reading the works of the ancient and outdated alchemists, a background that serves him ill when he attends university at Ingolstadt. There he learns about modern science and, within a few years, masters all that his professors have to teach him. He becomes fascinated with the “secret of life,” discovers it, and brings a hideous monster to life. The monster proceeds to kill Victor’s youngest brother, best friend, and wife; he also indirectly causes the deaths of two other innocents, including Victor’s father. Though torn by remorse, shame, and guilt, Victor refuses to admit to anyone the horror of what he has created, even as he sees the ramifications of his creative act spiraling out of control.

Victor changes over the course of the novel from an innocent youth fascinated by the prospects of science into a disillusioned, guilt-ridden man determined to destroy the fruits of his arrogant scientific endeavor. Whether as a result of his desire to attain the godlike power of creating new life or his avoidance of the public arenas in which science is usually conducted, Victor is doomed by a lack of humanness. He cuts himself off from the world and eventually commits himself entirely to an animalistic obsession with revenging himself upon the monster.

At the end of the novel, having chased his creation ever northward, Victor relates his story to Robert Walton and then dies. With its multiple narrators and, hence, multiple perspectives, the novel leaves the reader with contrasting interpretations of Victor: classic mad scientist, transgressing all boundaries without concern, or brave adventurer into unknown scientific lands, not to be held responsible for the consequences of his explorations.

Life Lessons In Frankenstein – 781 Words

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein compels a huge amount of lessons. In the book there are many lessons, they are taught by Victor, The Monster, and Walton. Walton is a character that is fearless explorer two explorers to the Arctic. Victor is a character who is crazy at some points but is really smart and is obsessed with this project. The Monster is a character that really can be understanding but is gullible and is really emotional. Finally, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Walton, Victor, and The Monster teach three life lessons: Don’t get caught up to complete an idea, don’t let your emotions get the best of you, be appreciative of loved ones and people you care about because you might not have them forever.A huge lesson was showed by Victor, that lesson is don’t get caught up with an idea. This lesson is important because at the time Victor was obsessed with finishing a project with humans and reviving them. This project that was supposed to make a big difference on the world but became a disaster. The amount of time he put in was extraordinary, but the project did not finish to be what it was supposed to be. The main purpose of the project was to put life into a body. Since Victor thought his family was supporting him, but they weren’t and he never found out they weren’t

Victor Frankenstein Accomplishments – 1356 Words

Mary Shelley was born on August 30, 1797, in Somers Town, London, United Kingdom. Shelley started writing Frankenstein when she was eighteen and published the novel anonymously in 1818 in London when Shelley was twenty. Frankenstein is a gothic novel that is considered to be one of the first examples of science fiction. This novel focuses on Victor Frankenstein a student of science and his creation of a disproportioned creature. This novel shifts between Victor and the Monster as playing villains. Victor was never there for the Monster and breaks his promise to him, did not help Justine in her time of need, and does not inform his family of the danger they are in. The Monster on the other hand kills most of Frankenstein’s family, plants evidence

Frankenstein spent nearly two years devoting his life to giving life to an inanimate body. Frankenstein was so excited about finishing his work until he brought it the creature to life. Once the creature came to life Frankenstein abandoned him. Victor said, “Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room, and continued a long time traversing my bedchambers, unable to compose my mind to sleep (Shelley, 43).” Victor cast aside his creation simply because of his looks he could not get passed them. If Victor would have accepted and embraced the Monster than the outcome of their relationship could have been very different. Frankenstein’s rejection was the start of his future and happiness being stripped away from him. He had a chance to redeem himself to the Monster and he promised him he would create a companion for him and again he denies him that right as well. Victor spends months creating a companion for the creature and once he was almost finished he “tore to pieces” the Monsters companion. Victor now not only betrayed his creation once, but twice. First Victor left him and then he breaks his promise that he made

Many times in the story Victor says that he is going to protect his family and even goes as far as carrying a gun, but yet he failed to protect any of them. “…I should return without delay to Geneva, there to watch over the lives of those I fondly loved (Shelley, 170)…” Victor said he was going to tell Elizabeth what was bothering him the morning after their wedding because he knew that the Monster would be dead or he would be since he promised to be with him on his wedding day. Victor had no intentions on telling Elizabeth or any of his family in this case of the danger they really were in because thus resulting the death of William, Justine, Henry, and Elizabeth. Even though Victor has a lot of wrongdoing so does the

Victor’s last words : did he learn his lesson? -Frankenstein

In Macbeth, the tragic hero/antagonist shows regret and dies, arguably, in submission to the forces of good – proving he has redeemable qualities. Here we are exploring whether Victor took responsibility for his errors and whether he’d changed from the beginning.

Let’s look at the evidence –

Walton in continuation / September 12th

“I have been examining my past conduct; nor do I find it blamable. (…) …his happiness and well being. This was my duty. But … my duties towards the beings of my own species had greater claims to my attention because they included a greater proportion of happiness and misery. Urged by this view, I did right in refusing to create a companion (…) He showed unparalleled malignity and selfishness ” – Victor addressing Walton

It is a little ambiguous as to whether ‘past conduct’ refers to the creation of the creature, or Victor’s recent wild outbursts while on the boat with Walton, although, the word ‘past’ likely suggests he means the creation of the creature and his behaviour towards the being after that. He acknowledges that he failed in his responsibility to the creature, but then tries to justify his failure by saying he took the Utilitarian view, and claims this was his same thought process in destroying the second creature. Chapter 20 – “Even if they were to leave … a race of devils would be propagated upon the earth(…) Had I right, for my own benefit, to inflict this curse upon everlasting generations? I shuddered to think that future ages might curse me as their pest…” Though he does consider the impact of compromising with the creature on the well-being of humanity, it’s clear to see that he is more concerned about his legacy. (Both the ‘take over’ of the creature’s offspring, and his legacy, would be most prominent after he died, and so it’s interesting to see what choice he makes when neither are affecting his life. It just goes to show that he is never occupied or satisfied with the moment, just as he spends the last few chapters chasing the creature until he dies, and will never be content.) He would rather die with pride than to let the creature live a worthwhile life.

Coming back to the idea of Victor having a Utilitarian view, there is far reason to believe that he instead acts with a selfish, yet human, need to protect the ones he loves and not just the majority of people. Victor even later admits that he is blinded and led astray but his emotions of grief and anger, over the loss of his loved ones,“I dare not ask you to do what I think right, for I may still be misled by passion.” It doesn’t make Victor a bad person as such, but rather it devalues his argument that he was doing the best for humanity, making him seem in-genuine and more like it was his explanation to justify his fear of making the second creature.

Utilitarian view – ethics centered around the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest amount of people

Walton in continuation / September 5th

Walton decides it’s too dangerous to continue the voyage and tells Victor he is going to return :

“What do you mean? (…) Are you, then, so easily turned from your design? (…) You were hereafter to be hailed as the benefactors of your species. (…) Do not return to your families with the stigma of disgrace. (…) Return as heroes…” – Victor addressing Walton

Walton in continuation / September 12th

“When actuated by selfish and vicious motives, I asked you to undertake my unfinished work, and I renew this request now…yet I cannot ask you to renounce your country and friends to fulfill this task(…) but the consideration of these points I leave you… I dare not ask you to do what I think right, for I may still be misled by passion.” – Victor addressing Walton

This does show a big development in Victor, as he not only recognises his faults but lets his pride down enough to admit them. He has now felt the pain of loss of his own friends, and does not want Walton to feel the same, showing he has finally learnt that the presence of loved ones gives greater satisfaction than the feeling of revenge. He has matured in that aspect, and leaves Walton to make his own decisions rather than using the influence he has over him, despite the fact that a big part of glory from discovery is the influence, admiration and faith others have in you.

Walton in continuation / September 12th

“Farewell, Walton! Seek happiness in tranquility and avoid ambition…(…) Yet, why do I say this? I have myself been blasted in these homes, yet another may succeed.” – Victor addressing Walton

The line ‘seek happiness in tranquility and avoid ambition’ marks the true turning point and moment of redemption for Victor. It’s a very romantic line (romantic, as in the poetry movement, not the adjective), using Victor as Mary Shelley’s mouth piece to explicitly give the final indictment (judgement) and one of the many moral messages, about how ambition can be selfish and ruinous. Like the views of the second generation romantics, it teaches satisfaction, content and gratitude, with the word ‘tranquility’ making the connection that these feelings can be provoked by nature and appreciating the sublime. The imperative ‘Seek’ is very reflective of romantic poems, with the way they often address the reader with this authoritative tone and wisdom intended to influence their audience, and so we get the sense this message is not only to Walton but to us, the readers.

His last line is more ambiguous – “Yet why do I say this? I have myself blasted in these homes, yet another may succeed.

One interpretation is that he is planting an underlying thought about success in Walton’s brain, making it appear as if he is sending a message against ambition but actually trying to provoke Walton to continue the search for the creature. It would give Walton the impression Victor is a man of good conscience, to preserve his pride, thus meaning Victor didn’t learn his lesson.

Another interpretation is that Victor simply doesn’t want to seem hypocritical, and that he isn’t trying to provoke Walton to be ambitious but rather just to flatter him with the idea Victor believes he has potential to succeed. It could show he’s become a more considerate man.

A third interpretation is that Victor simply says that, a point against his own, to admit that he isn’t all knowing and all wise and that he doesn’t believe he has the authority to make such statements. It’s a display of humbleness and shows Victor has changed.

A last interpretation draws on the one above. However, rather than it being a display of humbleness it’s Shelley using her voice to say that ethics in the world are too complicated to ever have complete faith in a decision or answer. Though she stands for the morals she wrote about in this novel, she admits that she herself does not have divine judgement such as God does, to declare perfect solutions.

Conclusion:

Victor did learn his lesson! He learnt that his intelligence and power does not give him the authority to make divine judgement, and that a selfish and careless life led by ambition is ruinous and miserable. He learnt that it was his duty to look after the creature, but stood by some of the decisions he made concerning the ethics of making the second creature, but then redeemed himself by arguing it’s best not to get to that point where a decision like that has to be made. He learnt the pain of loss and how he would not wish it on a human being, though his resentment for the creature ran through his veins until his dying moment. However, by that point he had been so traumatised by loss and anger, well deep into madness, and that we can accept the fact he was too damaged and fragile to have the strength of forgiveness.

– Ruby

The Lesson to Learn from Victor Frankenstein’s Story – Free Essay Example

Please note! This essay has been submitted by a student.

Since the beginning of his existence, man has embarked on an endless pursuit of self improvement, domination, and most tragically, forbidden knowledge. In Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, protagonist Victor Frankenstein’s ambitious desire to conquer man’s greatest fear, death, leads him down a road of overwhelming regret. Despite this air of negativity throughout the novel, Mary Shelley subtly illustrates that though the Faustian quest for forbidden knowledge becomes the detriment and fear of an individual, Victor Frankenstein, it also positively matures into the restraints that continue to preserve the human condition.

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As a young man, Victor Frankenstein was inspired to find the elixir of life by the works of famous alchemists like Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus. Though he gradually loses such interests, Frankenstein’s admission into the University of Ingolstadt revives his passion in “natural philosophy, and particularly chemistry, in the most comprehensive sense of term,” which, “became nearly [his] sole occupation” (49). Frankenstein’s uncontrollable obsession with reanimation becomes the basis of his Faustian journey. After successfully bringing life to his humanoid creature, “disgust filled [Frankenstein’s] heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being [Frankenstein] had created, [Frankenstein] rushed out of the room” (59). Evidently, though Frankenstein successfully brings his creature to life, he is frightened by the creature’s hideousness, a fear that he had not prepared for prior to and during his experimentation. While Frankenstein may have achieved one of man’s greatest goals, his addiction for forbidden knowledge and lack of preparation lends to a series of complications, including the fear that begins to control his life.

Burdened by the insurmountable terror of the creature, Frankenstein enters a state of depression and deep self-reflection in which he removes himself from society. Seeking vengeance for his creator’s abandonment, the creature murders Frankenstein’s brother, William, and housekeeper, Justine. Inflicted with guilt, Frankenstein is incapable of developing the courage to come forward with the truth. However, when confronted by the creature’s request for a female companion, Frankenstein asserts that he “never will create another like [the creature], equal in deformity and wickedness” (205). Dreading a potential society of monsters, Frankenstein is able to grow the intestinal fortitude to deny the wish of his creation. It is at this instant that as a Faustian character, Victor Frankenstein is able to find the strength and courage to restrain himself from the obsession that he had once become a subject to.

As much as Frankenstein’s new found audacity restrains himself from future experimentation, his silence does no good for restraining a society that is constantly seeking forbidden knowledge. Avoiding the monster, Frankenstein finds himself in the North Pole, fighting off the elements. It is here when Captain Robert Walton, an explorer seeking a Northern Passage to the Pacific Ocean, rescues and rehabilitates Frankenstein (3). Recovering from austere conditions, Frankenstein breaks his silence and begins to tell the tale of his scientific endeavors. Victor, warning Walton, insists that he “learn from [him], if not by [his] precepts, at least by [his] example how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge” (53). Having understood the ramifications of attaining inhuman knowledge, Victor Frankenstein musters up the courage to deny Walton’s endeavors , an attribute that he could not attain earlier. In a sense, the argument here could be made that Frankenstein’s life story is a necessary sacrifice to prevent others from attempting to attain godly powers. Consequently, by doing so, the human condition is not held back but protected.

Even though Frankenstein’s quest for forbidden knowledge becomes his own undoing, the example he sets becomes a deterrent for those who have similar motivations. Victor Frankenstein’s example becomes a precedence for what man should and should not seek.

Life Lessons In Frankenstein – 781 Words

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein compels a huge amount of lessons. In the book there are many lessons, they are taught by Victor, The Monster, and Walton. Walton is a character that is fearless explorer two explorers to the Arctic. Victor is a character who is crazy at some points but is really smart and is obsessed with this project. The Monster is a character that really can be understanding but is gullible and is really emotional. Finally, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Walton, Victor, and The Monster teach three life lessons: Don’t get caught up to complete an idea, don’t let your emotions get the best of you, be appreciative of loved ones and people you care about because you might not have them forever.A huge lesson was showed by Victor, that lesson is don’t get caught up with an idea. This lesson is important because at the time Victor was obsessed with finishing a project with humans and reviving them. This project that was supposed to make a big difference on the world but became a disaster. The amount of time he put in was extraordinary, but the project did not finish to be what it was supposed to be. The main purpose of the project was to put life into a body. Since Victor thought his family was supporting him, but they weren’t and he never found out they weren’t

The Lesson Of Frankenstein’s Lessons From Frankenstein

Frankenstein is a book that caters to many audiences, within the book itself as well as the readers. The book is a mix of drama, horror, and other genres. The book teaches many lessons about different things. Many of these lessons are about isolation, when you isolate yourself, you do not have any company, which may really affect your life in the negative. Many important lessons can be derived from Frankenstein and can have a real impact on some people. Lessons like these may seem pointless but can provide a guideline for your life. The creature that Victor creates is a very interesting creature who teaches many lessons when telling his story and may relate to some part of your life. One such lesson is “Everyone needs to be loved,” when Victor creates his monster, he realizes it’s ugliness and runs away, leaving the monster to escape. The creature, after having his creator abandon him, runs away, isolating himself from the rest of civilization. The creature never learned how to love, creating a heartless killer who, even after telling Victor his story, is hated, leading to the death of everyone Victor loved. If Victor had just sat down and tried to understand where the monster was coming from, it might have led to a different outcome, one quote, “I was benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend. Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous” (69), shows that the monster was miserable, therefore making him a savage, and that the lack of love and happiness can truly make a

Chapter 4

Summary and Analysis Chapter 4

Victor thought he was doing a service by creating a new human. He says, “A new species would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me. I might in process of time (although I now found it impossible) renew life where death had apparently devoted the body to corruption.” This goes back to the theme of learning and the use of knowledge for good or evil purposes. This quote also shows insight into Victor’s state of mind, how he had built up his own ego thinking that he would be revered by the creature(s) he creates. It makes Victor like a human god.

Victor admonishes his listener by saying “Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the aquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow.” Shelley warns her readers about how knowledge can be too much and can cause catastrophic problems. It is this creation of another race of men that Shelley seeks to place in the mind of the reader. It is also now demonstrably clear that death can be conquered, and that man’s replacement as God is now complete.

Victor is changing into a different person. His work is taking over his health, even though he knows, “a human being in perfection ought always to preserve a calm and peaceful mind and never to allow passion or a transitory desire to disturb his tranquillity. I do not think that the pursuit of knowledge is an exception to this rule.” But his work is taking over his life, and he knows it. He says, “every night I was oppressed by a slow fever, and I became nervous to a most painful degree; the fall of a leaf startled me, and I shunned my fellow creatures as if I had been guilty of a crime.” The last line in particular, “guilty of a crime,” seems important. Victor knows his work on the monster is morally repugnant and that if any person knew of his work, the outside world would be repulsed by the nature of his experiments.

Glossary

chimera an impossible or foolish fancy.

palpable clear to the mind; obvious; evident; plain.

countenance the look on a person’s face that shows one’s nature or feelings; the face; facial features; visage; a look of approval on the face, approval; support; sanction; calm control; composure.

charnel-house a building or place where corpses or bones are deposited.

dogmatism dogmatic assertion of opinion, usually without reference to evidence.

pedantry ostentatious display of knowledge, or an instance of this; an arbitrary adherence to rules and forms.

physiognomy facial features and expression, esp. as supposedly indicative of character; the face; apparent characteristics; outward features or appearance.

arduous difficult to do; laborious; onerous; using much energy; strenuous.

What does Frankenstein learn throughout the course of the novel, and how do his plans change?

The existing educator answer gives a number of excellent points about the various ways in which Frankenstein brings about his own destruction and the destruction of those around him, and yet this does not actually make him alter his course—he is determined to be lord over this being he has created, and will not allow it to guide his decisions, even when he sees that it is not the pliant son he had envisioned, but a creature with its own needs, desires, motivations and angers. “I WILL BE WITH YOU ON YOUR WEDDING NIGHT,” the Creature famously says, demonstrating a strength of will and a capacity for (we may feel, justified) revenge which Frankenstein had not anticipated. Still, Frankenstein makes no attempt to reason with the Creature or really to help it; he wants to be a god over it, and indeed destroys the bride he had created for it in the feeling that the Creature does not deserve it. Frankenstein is sure that Frankenstein is right about everything.

We can see this clearly in the language Frankenstein uses in speaking to Walton of his endeavors. He knows he is reaching the end of his life, but the “evils” that have led him to it he describes as “great and unparalleled misfortunes” which he has “suffered.” They are “misfortunes,” and Frankenstein tells Walton that “nothing can alter my destiny.” As far as Frankenstein is concerned, we can see from this passive language that he does not, even now, believe himself to have been the agent or instrument of his own misfortunes. He has convinced himself that “destiny,” rather than his own bad decisions, have led him to where he is now, at the end of the world and awaiting the Creature’s arrival. Surely there could be no better evidence of how completely Frankenstein has failed to learn anything from what he has done, suffering under this enormous sense of self-removal from his own actions and unable to take any responsibility for what has happened. Frankenstein believes he is “destined” to be here: this, more than anything else, seems to indicate that if he could live his life again, he does not believe he could change anything to alter how he ends up.

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