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Can You Wear Lashes In The Army | I Almost Got Kicked Out The Army Bc Of My Lashes 9105 Votes This Answer

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The U.S Army stipulates soldiers must dress conservatively from head to toe. The code explicitly states that appearance must be natural enough not to attract attention to the soldier. Eyelash extensions make no exception and are not authorized according to Army Regulation 670–1.A major change for women is that false eyelashes are now authorized. They must be natural eyelash color and can not exceed 14 millimeters in length. Women are also no longer required to wear hosiery with dress uniforms – they have the option of wearing it.Exaggerated cosmetic styles are not authorized with the uniform and shall not be worn. Care should be taken to avoid an artificial appearance. Lipstick colors shall be conservative and present a complementary appearance. Long false eyelashes shall not be worn when in uniform.

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Can you wear fake lashes in the Air Force?

A major change for women is that false eyelashes are now authorized. They must be natural eyelash color and can not exceed 14 millimeters in length. Women are also no longer required to wear hosiery with dress uniforms – they have the option of wearing it.

Can you wear false lashes in the Navy?

Exaggerated cosmetic styles are not authorized with the uniform and shall not be worn. Care should be taken to avoid an artificial appearance. Lipstick colors shall be conservative and present a complementary appearance. Long false eyelashes shall not be worn when in uniform.

Do eyelash extensions look natural?

Eyelash extensions are meant to be uniform and natural looking. There is much versatility in the eyelash extension industry since its infancy, however, the classic set of one eyelash extension to one natural lash will provide the most natural look.

Can Army soldiers have eyelash extensions?

Women may wear cosmetics “conservatively.” That means no unnatural or exaggerated appearance, and no more fake eyelashes. Nail polish will only be worn in service, mess or dress uniforms. Women’s fingernail length will not exceed a quarter of an inch. No fake nails, add-ons or extensions will be authorized.

Can you wear eyeliner in the military?

Permanent makeup, such as eyebrow or eyeliner, is authorized as long as the makeup conforms to the standards outlined above. Females will not wear shades of lipstick and nail polish that distinctly contrast with their complexion, that detract from the uniform, or that are extreme.

Can you wear makeup in the military?

The Army is drastically changing some of its grooming standards and hinting at even more changes when it comes to inclusivity and convenience regarding soldiers’ uniforms in the near future. Certain hairstyles, jewelry, makeup and other accessories will now be accepted parts of the way soldiers can present themselves.

Are military creases on uniforms mandatory?

Appropriate undergarments shall be worn to preserve the dignity and appearance of the Uniform. f. Military Creases. Military creases on shirts are an individual option.
SECTION 1 ARTICLE
3. PROFESSIONAL MILITARY APPEARANCE 2101.3
4. CARE OF THE UNIFORM 2101.4
5. CLEANING 2101.5

Can you wear Airpods in Navy uniform?

(h) The use of an earpiece, blue tooth technology, headsets or hands-free device while in Uniform indoors or outdoors is prohibited unless specifically authorized for the execution of official duties (e.g. NSW, security personnel, detailers, etc.).

How long do lashes last for?

The normal life cycle of a natural lash can be as short as two weeks and as long as eight weeks.

Do eyelashes grow back?

As an adult, you might be less excited to notice your eyelashes falling out. It’s natural to wonder if they will ever grow back. But, just like hair on your head, eyelashes grow, fall out, and regrow again in a natural cycle.

How long do fake lashes last?

Because extensions are attached to the lash itself, they last as long as the natural growth cycle, or about six weeks.

Can You Wear Eyelash Extensions in the Military? (Answered!)

Military rules are different from civilian corporations, especially regarding appearance, including makeup. Each branch of the United States Armed Forces has its own dress code and regulations.

So, can you wear eyelash extensions in the military? More specifically, are lash extensions allowed in the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force?

Eyelash extensions are not allowed in the Army as per Army Regulation 670–1. The Navy’s dress code stipulates that long false eyelashes shall not be worn when in uniform. Finally, the Air Force regulates female eyelash extensions to natural eyelash color, not to exceed 14 millimeters in length.

Read on to discover the specific rules, nuances, and regulations concerning eyelash extensions for Army, Navy, and Air Force personnel in detail today.

Ready? Let’s dive in!

Are Eyelash Extensions Allowed in the Military?

Because each branch of the U.S. military has its own dress code and regulations, it is impossible to know if lash extensions are allowed in the military without looking at each military branch individually.

For reference, there are currently 6 branches of the United States Armed Forces:

U.S. Army

U.S. Marine Corps

U.S. Navy

Air Force

U.S. Space Force

U.S. Coast Guard

In this article, I take a deep dive into whether or not you can wear lash extensions in the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force.

Are Eyelash Extensions Allowed in the Army?

The U.S Army stipulates soldiers must dress conservatively from head to toe. The code explicitly states that appearance must be natural enough not to attract attention to the soldier.

Eyelash extensions make no exception and are not authorized according to Army Regulation 670–1.[1]

These regulations apply to “regular Army, the Army National Guard, and the U.S Army Reserve, Army Civilians, Army Veterans, Training Corps, Corps of Cadets, and U.S Military Academy when in uniform”

However, these don’t apply to “Chief of Staff of the Army, or former Chiefs of Staff of the Army, each of whom may prescribe their own uniform.”

I urge you not to disobey any AR regulations about fake lashes as it’s a serious offense.

Violating any specific regulations by soldiers may lead to “adverse administrative action and/or charges” according to the Code of Military Justice.

Here’s a video of a U.S Army eyelash extension wearer talking about her experience with lash extensions in the army.

There are two reasons or situations where you would be allowed to wear your eyelash extensions in the Army.

1. Medical Reason Exception

According to the new AR Regulations 670-1 released in January 2021, “Eyelash extensions are not authorized unless medically prescribed.”[1]

As for the medical reasons for allowing eyelash extensions in the Army, this is a matter of discussion between the soldier and their doctor.

Once you have a medically valid reason, I suggest you also talk with your superior officer regarding the medical obligations to get approval.

2. Off Duty

Army personnel interested in eyelash extensions can wear them when not on duty.

Flaunt your beautiful lashes all you want during vacations!

That said, be prepared to let them go when you’re joining back on duty. And history shows once you get hooked on lash extensions, it’s hard to bid them goodbye. True story!

Are Eyelash Extensions Allowed in the Navy?

Yes, you can wear lash extensions in the U.S Navy, provided they aren’t too long.

According to the personal apperance regulations in the Navy, “Exaggerated or faddish cosmetic styles are not authorized with the uniform and shall not be worn. Care should be taken to avoid an artificial appearance. Long false eyelashes shall not be worn when in uniform.”[2]

Hence, the regulations don’t say anything about wearing conservative, classic, or short eyelash extensions.

But make sure your false lashes look modest and natural besides matching your natural features. So, loud, fancy, and outlandish styles must be strictly avoided.

If you don’t adhere to the rules, severe punitive actions may be taken against you.

Are Eyelash Extensions Allowed in the Air Force?

Although the United States Air Force didn’t allow eyelash extensions a while ago, the new regulation published on Dec. 4, 2021, now allows them.

According to AFI 36-2903, “Department of the Air Force guidance memorandum regulates female eyelash extensions to natural eyelash color, not to exceed 14 millimeters in length.”[3]

So, both the Classic eyelash extensions and the Natural Sweep styles fit the dress code.

Pro Tip: Check out my article if you want to know more about the different extension styles that would best fit your eye shape.

Check out Missy Lynn, an Air Force soldier, who did an Air Force Beauty Do’s and Don’ts video.

Final Thoughts

The U.S Military has many rules in place regarding hair and facial makeup because military personnel shouldn’t attract unwanted attention to themselves.

The goal is that soldiers in uniform must look uniform too.

Semi-permanent makeups like eyelash extensions aren’t allowed at all in the Army when on duty.

However, the regulations about eyelash extension in the Navy and Air Force are slightly different. You aren’t allowed to wear long eyelashes in unnatural colors in the Navy. On the other hand, the Air Force allows lash extensions of lengths up to 14 mm.

In any case, falsies aren’t a good choice for military personnel because they always look unnatural. However, classic eyelash extensions are carefully attached to match the wearer’s lashes’ natural curl, length, and thickness. They can look gorgeous, natural, and modest too!

For example, this classic natural full set enhances the natural lashes and results in a very natural-looking set of lashes.

It is important to understand the differences between falsies and eyelash extensions when making your decision. Falsies will generally look more fake than extensions.

In case of any doubts, consult your superior officer before going for a specific style of lash extensions. This way, you won’t be penalized if your lash extensions aren’t appropriate.

Stay beautiful!

– Asako

Additional Readings on DivineLashes.ca: Would you like to know when you can or shouldn’t wear eyelash extensions? Check out my article on wearing lash extensions for nurses and if you can get eyelash extensions when pregnant. Also, read my guide on how to get very natural-looking eyelash extensions.

References

U.S Army (2021). Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia. Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/ARN30302-AR_670-1-000-WEB-1.pdf (Accessed on 7 April 2022). Chapter Two- U.S Navy Uniform Regulations (Grooming Standards). Retrieved from https://www.mynavyhr.navy.mil/References/US-Navy-Uniforms/Uniform-Regulations/Chapter-2/2201-Personal-Appearance/ (Accessed on 7 April 2022). Department of the Air Force (2020). AFI 36-2903 Updates. Retrieved from https://static.e-publishing.af.mil/production/1/af_a1/publication/dafi36-2903/dafi36-2903.pdf (Accessed 7 April 2022).

Air Force Uniform Rules Cleared for Takeoff: Bring on the Lash Extensions

The Air Force released an updated Air Force Instruction (AFI) 36-2903 on December 3. The guidance keeps the uniform changes trend moving forward, this time for Airmen and Guardians dress and appearance regulations. Besides republishing guidance from the Department of the Air Force guidance memorandum for female hair standards and incorporating other needed corrections identified in the AFI, there were also 26 additional changes added in the revised AFI. The Air Force is once again leading the way with changes that service members have been requesting for years and may influence other services to follow suit.

Changes on Hair, Pockets, and Drinking Water while in Uniform

There are so many changes in this updated AFI, but a key adjustment is a loosened focus on Airmen or Guardians putting their hands in their pockets. All military branches have prohibited the practice of putting your hands in your pockets while in uniform, but this is no longer the case. Also, the line preventing service members from talking on a cell phone or drinking water while walking has been removed.

There were also changes around both men and women hair standards. Male bulk hair standards increased from two inches to two- and one-half inches. Cosmetic tattooing on the scalp is authorized for men. The size of hair accessories width for women increased from one inch to two inches for females. And hair dye for all Airmen/Guardians is now authorized.

A major change for women is that false eyelashes are now authorized. They must be natural eyelash color and can not exceed 14 millimeters in length. Women are also no longer required to wear hosiery with dress uniforms – they have the option of wearing it.

The AFI also provided extra clarification regarding both male and female hair color. Stating that if applied, dyes, tints, bleaches, and frostings must result in natural hair colors. Examples of natural hair are brown, blonde, brunette, natural red, and black. Natural blending such as highlights or salt and pepper hair coloring are authorized. And all non-natural hair colors are still not authorized. Further information was provided for beards allowed for medical reasons stating beard length must not exceed ¼ and appear neat and conservative.

Other Uniform Updates Made

Updates relate to the Physical Training Gear (PTG) were also included. Shirt are no longer required to be tucked in. If a PTG shirt is not tucked in, it must extend to the bottom of the side pocket on the shorts or pants but cannot cover the shorts reflective material. Undershirts are still authorized, but they cannot extend longer than untucked PTG. The AFI also authorized the wear of sweatbands with physical training gear. The authorized colors are black, white, or dark blue with an Air Force symbol or U.S. Air Force painted/embroidered on the front.

There are also a number of changes around uniform wear. One of the biggest highlights is the authorization of commanders able to allow the tucking of Operational Camouflaged patterns (OCP) coat for duty as necessary and folding the cuff twice inward. An OCP tactical cap is also now authorized. There was also various information provided for patches, pen/pencil holders and specialized instructions for various units and specialized badges or tabs. You can read the full AFI here and page three highlights the new changes.

Personal Appearance

SECTION 2 PERSONAL APPEARANCE ARTICLE 1 HAIR 2201.1 2 SHAVING AND MUSTACHES 2201.2 3 HAIRPIECES 2201.3 4 COSMETICS 2201.4 5 FINGERNAILS 2201.5 6 JEWELRY 2201.6 7 TATTOOS 2201.7 8 MUTILATION 2201.8 9 DENTAL ORNAMENTATION 2201.9 10 NAVY PERSONNEL WITH WAIVERABLE PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS 2201.10 11 NAVY PERSONNEL WITH NON-WAIVERABLE PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS 2201.11

2201. PERSONAL APPEARANCE. Because it is impossible to provide examples of every acceptable or unacceptable hairstyle or “conservative” grooming and personal appearance, the good judgment of leaders at all levels is key to enforcement of navy grooming policy. Therefore, hair/grooming/personal appearance while in uniform shall present a neat, professional military appearance. Commanding officers will ensure facial hair does not impede the ability to safely wear and properly utilize emergency equipment when required.

1. HAIR

a. Men . Keep hair neat, clean and well groomed (combed or brushed). Hairstyles and haircuts will present a balanced professional military appearance. Hairstyles/haircuts worn while in uniform or in a duty status will meet the criteria outlined in this paragraph. When wearing the uniform or in a duty status, hairstyles/haircuts will have hair off the ears and above the collar. Hair will be no more than 2 inches in bulk, 4 inches in length and not to extend below the eyebrows when headgear is removed or show underneath when headwear is worn. Bulk is defined as the distance that the mass of hair protrudes from the scalp. Hairstyles worn in uniform will not interfere with the wearing of all uniform covers or the proper wearing of safety equipment. Hairstyles with hair above the ears and around the neck will be tapered from the lower natural hairline upwards at least 3/4 inch and outward not greater than 3/4 inch to blend with longer hair. Hair coloring must look natural. Multicolored hair is not authorized. The unique quality and texture of curled, waved, and straight hair are recognized, and in some cases the 3/4 inch taper at the back of the neck may be difficult to attain. In all cases, hair from the back and sides must present a graduated appearance from the hairline upward. Tapers may include a straight, blocked or rounded edge line at the back of the neck. One cut, clipped or shaved narrow, fore and aft part, no longer than 4 inches in length and no more than 1/8th inch in width is authorized. Varying hairstyles, including flat top, bald/shaved heads, high and tight, hi-top and low-top fades, afros, and similar styles are examples of authorized hairstyles. Plaited, braided, locks, twists, faux hawk hairstyles or hairstyles similar in appearance are examples of unauthorized hairstyles in uniform or in a duty status. Sideburns worn will be neatly trimmed and tailored in the same manner as the haircut. The hair length of the sideburns will not exceed the hair length where it intersects with the haircut. Sideburns will not extend below a point level with the middle of the ear, will be of even width (not flared) and will end with a clean shaven horizontal line. Sideburns are not authorized with bald hairstyles Figure 2‑2‑1 refers. “Muttonchops”, “ship’s captain”, or similar grooming modes are not authorized.

b. Women . This policy applies to female Sailors while wearing the Navy uniform and when wearing civilian clothes in the performance of duty.

(1) Acceptable Hairstyle Criteria. Hairstyles will not detract from a professional military appearance in uniform. Hairstyles and haircuts will present a balanced professional military appearance. Appropriateness of a hairstyle will be evaluated by its appearance when headgear is worn. All headgear will fit snugly and comfortably around the largest part of the head without distortion or excessive gaps. Hairstyles will not interfere with the proper wearing of headgear, protective masks or equipment. When headgear is worn, hair will not show from under the front of the headgear. Hair is not to protrude from the opening in the back of the ball cap, except when wearing a bun or ponytail hairstyle. All buns and ponytails will be positioned on the back of the head to ensure the proper wearing of all headgear.

(2) Lopsided and extremely asymmetrical hairstyles are not authorized. Angled hairstyles will have no more than a 1-1/2 inch difference between the front and the back length of hair. Layered hairstyles are authorized provided layers present a smooth and graduated appearance.

(3) Hair length, when in uniform, may touch, but not fall below a horizontal line level with the lower edge of the back of the collar. With jumper uniforms, hair may extend a maximum of 1-1/2 inches below the top of the jumper collar. Long hair, including braids, will be neatly fastened, pinned, or secured to the head. When bangs are worn, they will not extend below the eyebrows. Hair length will be sufficient to prevent the scalp from being readily visible (with the exception of documented medical conditions).

(4) Hair bulk (minus the bun) as measured from the scalp will not exceed 2 inches. Figure 2-2-2 refers. The bulk of the bun will not exceed 3 inches when measured from the scalp and the diameter of the bun will not exceed or extend beyond the width of the back of the head. Loose ends must be tucked in and secured.

(5) Hair, wigs, or hair extensions/pieces must be of a natural hair color (i.e. blonde, brunette, brown, red, gray, or black). Hair extensions/pieces must match the current color of hair. Wigs, hairpieces and extensions will be of such quality and fit so as to present a natural appearance and conform to the grooming guidelines listed herein. Tints and highlights will result in natural hair colors and be similar to the current base color of the hair.

(6) Very short length hairstyles will not exceed two inches in bulk and four inches in length anywhere on the head. Very short length hairstyles may also include a taper at the back and side of the head and one straight fore and aft hard part. The lower edge of tapers may be rounded, squared or shapeless. Tapers will extend from the lower hairline at the back and side of the head upward to facilitate gradual blending with longer hair lengths. Hard parts are optional and will not exceed four inches in length and one-eighth of an inch in width. One hard part may be edged, shaved or clipped on the left or right side of the head, positioned above the temple, but no higher than the crown of the head where the side and top of the head meet. Bald hairstyles (razor cut or shaved short) remain unauthorized except in the case of medically prescribed treatments and required care. Styles with shaved portions of the scalp (other than the neckline), those with designs cut, braided, or parted into the hair, as well as dyed using unnatural colors are not authorized. The unique quality and texture of curled, waved and straight hair are recognized. While this list will not be considered all inclusive, the following hairstyles are authorized.

a. Three strand braids and two strand braids (also referred to as twists) are authorized. Braided hairstyles shall be conservative and conform to the guidelines listed herein.

b. Multiple braids. Multiple braids consist of more than 2 braids and encompass the whole head. When a hairstyle of multiple braids is worn, each braid shall be of uniform dimension, small in diameter (no more than 1/4 inch), and tightly interwoven to present a neat, professional, well groomed appearance. Foreign material (e.g., beads, decorative items) shall not be braided into the hair. Multiple braids may be worn loose, or may be pulled straight back into a bun, within the guidelines herein.

c. Two individual braids. One braid worn on each side of the head, uniform in dimension and no more than one inch in diameter. Each braid extends from the front to back of the head near the lower portion of the hair line (i.e., braids are closer to the top of the ear than the top of the head to prevent interference with wearing of headgear). A single french braid may be worn starting near the top of the head and be braided to the end of the hair. The end of the braid must be secured to the head and braid placement shall be down the middle of the back of the head.

d. Corn rows. Must be in symmetrical fore and aft rows, and must be close to the head, leaving no hair unbraided. They must be no larger than 1/4 inch in diameter and show no more than approximately 1/8 inch of scalp between rows. Corn row ends shall not protrude from the head. Rows must end at the nape of the neck and shall be secured with rubber bands that match the color of the hair. Corn rows may end in a bun conforming to the guidelines listed herein, if hair length permits.

e. Rolls. Two individual rolls, one on each side of the head, must be near the lower portion of the hair line (i.e., rolls are closer to the top of the ear than the top of the head and will not interfere with wearing of headgear). Rolls must be of uniform dimension and no more than one inch in diameter.

f. Locks. Lock hairstyle (locks) for the purpose of Navy uniform regulations grooming standards consists of one section of hair that twists from or near the root to the end of the hair and creates a uniform ringlet or cord-like appearance. Locks may be worn in short, medium, and long hair lengths in the following manner:

(1) Locks must continue from the root to the end of the hair in one direction (no zig-zagging, curving, or ending before the end of the lock to dangle as a wisp or loose hair) and should encompass the whole head. Locks partings must be square or rectangle in shape in order to maintain a neat and professional military appearance.

(2) Locks can be loose (free-hanging where no hair is added to the lock once it is started other than hair extensions that are attached to natural hair). When worn loose, locks will be spaced no more than three-eighths of an inch apart, diameter/width will not exceed three-eighths of an inch, and locks will be tightly interlaced to present a neat and professional military appearance. Locks may also be worn in a bun provided all hair grooming requirements are met. Faux locks are authorized provided the hairstyle worn is in compliance with female hair grooming requirements. Locks may not be worn in combination with other hair styles (e.g. twists, braids).

(3) New growth (defined as hair that naturally grows from the scalp and has not yet been locked) will not exceed one-half inch at any time.

(4) Locks that do not meet the above standards and do not present a neat and professional military appearance will not be worn in uniform. Commanding officers have the ultimate responsibility for determining when hairstyles are out of standards.

g. Ponytails. A ponytail is a hairstyle in which the hair on the head is pulled away from the face, gathered and secured at the back of the head with an approved accessory. Hair extending beyond the securing accessory may be braided or allowed to extend naturally. The wear of a single braid, French braid, or a single ponytail in Service, Working, and PT uniforms is authorized. The following criteria pertain to the wearing of ponytail hairstyles while wearing a U.S. Navy uniform. Ponytail hairstyles will not interfere with the proper wearing of military headwear and equipment nor extend downward more than three inches below the lower edge of the collar (shirt/blouse, jacket or coat) while sitting, standing or walking. Additionally, ponytails will not extend outward more than three inches behind the head as measured from the securing accessory, nor shall the width exceed the width of the back of the head or be visible from the front. In spaces or environments where there are operational hazards such as rotating gear, etc., the hair may not be worn below the bottom of the collar.

h. Hair Accessories. When hair accessories are worn, they must be consistent with the hair color. A maximum of two small barrettes, similar to hair color, may be used to secure the hair to the head. Bun accessories (used to form the bun), are authorized if completely concealed. Additional hairpins, bobby pins, small rubber bands, or small thin fabric elastic bands may be used to hold hair in place, if necessary. The intent is for pinned-up hair to be styled in a manner that prevents loose ends from extending upward or outward from the head. For example, when using barrettes or hairpins, hair will not extend loosely from the head; when hair is in a bun, all loose ends must be tucked in and secured. Hair accessories shall not present a safety or Foreign Object Damage (FOD) hazard. Hair nets shall not be worn unless authorized for a specific type of duty. Headbands, scrunchies, combs, claws and butterfly clips, are examples of accessories that are not authorized; this list is not to be considered all inclusive.

i. Unauthorized Hairstyles. While this list shall not be considered all inclusive, the following hairstyles are not authorized: pigtails; braids that are widely spaced and/or protrude from the head.

j. Grooming Standards Exception.

(1). During group command/unit physical training, Commanding Officers are authorized to standardize unit policy for the relaxation of Female hair Grooming Standards with regard to having hair secured to head (e.g., ponytails). Hair restraining devices, if worn, will be consistent with the current hair color.

(2). Relaxed Hair Requirement with Dinner Dress Uniforms. Female Sailors are authorized to wear their hair below the lower edge of the collar of the blouse, jacket, or coat of the dinner dress uniform being worn. All other navy grooming requirements will remain in effect per the guidance promulgated by this instruction.

2. Men. SHAVING AND MUSTACHES. The face will be clean shaven unless a shaving waiver is authorized by the Commanding Officer per BUPERSINST 1000.22 or a religious accommodation has been granted per BUPERSINST 1730.11. Mustaches are authorized but will be kept neatly and closely trimmed. No portion of the mustache will extend below the lip line of the upper lip. It will not go beyond a horizontal line extending across the corners of the mouth and no more than 1/4 inch beyond a vertical line drawn from the corner of the mouth. The length of an individual mustache hair fully extended will not exceed approximately 1/2 inch. (Figure 2‑2‑1) refers. Handlebar mustaches, goatees, beards, beneath the lower lip or chin hair are not permitted. If a shaving regimen or waiver is authorized per BUPERSINST 1000.22 or BUPERSINST 1730.11, beards will be properly groomed (clean and combed or brushed). The outer edges of the beard on the face or neck area may be optionally outlined/edged. Outlining, edging or shaping the beard is defined as light clipping or trimming of hair at the very outer edges of the beard to give a shaped appearance. If outlining results in skin irritation discontinue edging the beard. Beards will not exceed 1/4 inch in length unless expressly granted per religious accommodation waiver. Supervisors of individuals with medical shaving waivers will actively monitor and ensure treatment regimen is followed. The following personnel are not authorized to wear any facial hair except when medical waivers or religious accommodation have been granted:

a. Brig prisoners.

b. Brig awardees.

c. Personnel in a disciplinary hold status (i.e., who are serving restriction or hard labor without confinement or extra duties as a result of a court‑martial or NJP).

d. Personnel assigned to a transient personnel unit who are awaiting separation:

(1) By reason of a court‑martial sentence.

(2) To benefit the service (MILPERSMAN 1910-164).

(3) Pursuant to the recommendation or waiver of an administrative discharge board, for misconduct (MILPERSMAN 1910-140).

3. HAIRPIECES. Wigs or hairpieces shall be of good quality and fit, present a natural appearance and conform to the grooming standards set forth in these regulations. They shall not interfere with the proper performance of duty nor present a safety or FOD (Foreign Object Damage) hazard.

a. Men. Wigs or hairpieces may be worn by active duty personnel while in uniform or duty status only for cosmetic reasons to cover natural baldness or physical disfigurement. Wigs may be worn by Naval Reserve Personnel engaged in inactive duty for training.

b. Women. Wigs or hairpieces meeting women’s grooming standards are authorized for wear by personnel while in uniform or duty status.

GROOMING STANDARDS FOR MEN

Figure 2-2-1

– – – – – – – INDICATES SCALP LINE

Sideburns shall not extend below a point level with the middle of the ear, as indicated by line “A”.

When a mustache is worn it shall not:

Go below a horizontal line extending across the corner of the mouth as indicated by line “B”.

Extend more than 1/4 inch beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corners of the mouth as indicated by line “C”.

Protrude below the lip line of the upper lip as indicated by line “D”.

Hairstyles properly groomed shall not be greater than approximately 2 inches in bulk. Bulk is the distance that the mass of hair protrudes from the scalp. No individual hair will measure more than 4 inches in length.

GROOMING STANDARDS FOR WOMEN

Figure 2-2-2

Haircuts and styles shall present a balanced appearance. Lopsided and extremely asymmetrical styles are not authorized. Pigtails, widely spaced individual hanging locks, and braids which protrude from the head are not authorized. Multiple braids are authorized. No portion of the bulk of the hair as measured from the scalp shall exceed approximately 2 inches. Hair shall not fall below a horizontal line level with the lower edge of the back of the collar as indicated by line A. When wearing Jumper uniforms, hair can extend a maximum of 1-1/2 inches below the top of the Jumper collar.

4. COSMETICS (Women). Cosmetics may be applied so that colors blend and enhance natural features. Exaggerated cosmetic styles are not authorized with the uniform and shall not be worn. Care should be taken to avoid an artificial appearance. Lipstick colors shall be conservative and present a complementary appearance. Long false eyelashes shall not be worn when in uniform.

a. Cosmetic Permanent Makeup. Cosmetic permanent makeup is authorized for eyebrows, Eyeliner, lipstick and lip liner only. Permanent makeup shall blend naturally to enhance a natural appearance. Exaggerated cosmetic styles are not authorized and shall not be obtained. Approved permanent makeup colors are as follows: Eyebrows shall be shades of black, brown, blonde or red that matches the individual’s natural hair color. Eyeliner shall be shades of black, brown, blue or green that matches the individual’s natural eye color and shall not extend past the natural corner of the eye. Lip liner and lipstick shall be the color of the natural lip or shades of pink and moderate reds only. Permanent makeup is considered an elective medical procedure that is accomplished by qualified medical professionals to enhance natural features and requires careful planning and consideration of associated risks and liabilities to the Sailor.

b. Requesting Procedures.

(1). Female service members assigned to their permanent duty station shall submit a Special Request Authorization Form (NAVPERS 1336/3) to their Commanding Officer expressing their desire to obtain permanent makeup. Included with the special request form shall be a description of the procedure facility and desired feature enhancements.

(2). Commanding Officers are to review permanent makeup notification requests to ensure description of enhancements is in compliance with cosmetic policy requirements and that requesting Sailors are counseled prior to obtaining permanent makeup. Additionally, Commanding Officers will ensure requests for permanent makeup are annotated in member’s medical record and medical entries are made after permanent makeup is obtained. Counseling of Sailors should include and might not be limited to the following topics: personal financial impact of obtaining procedure. Qualification of provider of permanent makeup such as a qualified, licensed electrologist, esthetician or state board certified technician. The permanency and risks associated with procedures. The procedure cannot interfere with performance of military duties; planned leave to facilitate healing and return to full duty. The possible non-availability of military treatment facilities. The possibility of administrative separation if permanent makeup is non-compliant with cosmetic policies.

(3) Commanding Officers of members who have obtained permanent makeup that is not in accordance with existing policies shall document the condition on a NAVPERS 1070/613. Submit Enlisted Personnel’s NAVPERS 1070/613 to the local Personnel Support Detachment for inclusion in the field service record. Submit Officer Personnel’s NAVPERS 1070/613 to COMNAVPERSCOM (PERS 312) for inclusion in the electronic service record. Members not complying with permanent makeup policy requirements may be subject to administrative or disciplinary action. If removal or alteration non compliant permanent makeup condition is not feasible, the Member may be processed for involuntary separation, if deemed appropriate by the Commanding Officer.

5. FINGERNAILS

a. Men. Fingernails shall not extend past fingertips. They shall be kept clean. The tips of the nails may be round to align with the contour of the fingertip. Buffed nails or clear coat nail polish authorized. Colored nail polish is not authorized for men.

b. Women. Fingernails shall not exceed 1/4 inch measured from the fingertip. They shall be kept clean. The tips of the nails may be round, almond/oval, or square in shape. Nail polish may be worn, but colors shall be conservative. White, black, red, yellow, orange, green, purple, blue, hot pink, grey, glitter, striped, or any sort of pattern/decorative nail polish are examples of unauthorized nail polish colors. French and american manicures (white and off-white tips with neutral base color ONLY) are authorized.

6. JEWELRY. Conservative jewelry is authorized for all personnel while in uniform. Jewelry that distracts from the professional military appearance while in uniform is not authorized. Jewelry shall not present a safety or FOD (foreign object damage) hazard. Jewelry shall be worn within the following guidelines:

a. Rings. While in uniform, rings shall be conservative. Rings that distract from the professional military appearance of the individual in uniform are not authorized. Rings may consist of natural metals or fabricated materials (i.e. plastic, wood, silicone) and may be gold, silver, copper, grey, tan, brown, black, white, or light pink in color. Only one ring per hand is authorized, plus a wedding/engagement ring set. Double stacking wedding rings with military academy/educational institution rings is authorized on one hand. Rings shall not present a safety or foreign object damage (FOD) hazard. Rings are not permitted to be worn on the thumb.

b. Earrings.

(1) Men. Not authorized while in uniform or in civilian attire when in a duty status. Earrings may be worn with civilian clothing while in a leave or liberty status on or off military installation and when travelling in a government vehicle, or while participating in any organized military recreational activities ashore unless otherwise prohibited by prescribing authority. When considered appropriate by the prescribing authority under article 7201.2, earrings may be prohibited while in foreign countries.

(2) Women. One earring per ear (centered on earlobe) may be worn while in uniform. Earrings shall be 4mm – 6mm ball (approximately 1/8 – 1/4 inch), plain with shiny or brushed matte finish, screw on or with posts. When wearing working and service uniforms, officers and CPOs will wear gold earrings and E6 and below females shall wear silver earrings. When wearing dress uniforms white pearl earrings are optional. White pearl and diamond earrings are authorized for optional wear with the Dinner Dress White or Blue Jacket uniform. Synthetic variants of pearl or diamond earrings are acceptable if they meet color and size requirements.

c. Body Piercing. Not authorized while in uniform. No articles, other than earrings for women specified above, shall be attached to or through the ear, nose, or any other body part. Additionally, body piercing is not authorized in civilian attire when in a duty status or while in/aboard any ship, craft, aircraft, or in any military vehicle or within any base or other place under military jurisdiction, or while participating in any organized military recreational activities. When considered appropriate by the prescribing authority under article 7201.2, body piercing may be prohibited while in foreign countries.

d. Necklaces/Choker. While in uniform, only one necklace may be worn and it shall not be visible.

e. Bracelets. While in uniform, bracelets will be conservative. Bracelets that distract from the professional military appearance of the individual in uniform are not authorized. Bracelets may consist of natural metals or fabricated materials (e.g., plastic, wood, silicone or stone) and may be solid black, brown, dark green, grey, navy blue, tan, white, copper, gold and silver only. Only one bracelet may be worn while in uniform. When wearing a bracelet, a wristwatch/smartwatch or fitness tracker is not authorized on the same wrist as the bracelet. Ankle bracelets in uniform are not authorized. Bracelets will not present a safety or FOD hazard.

f. Wristwatch/Smartwatch/Fitness Tracker . While in uniform, wristwatches/smartwatches and fitness trackers will be conservative and not present a uniform distraction. Only one wristwatch/smartwatch or fitness tracker and one bracelet may be worn simultaneously (one on each wrist) while in uniform. Smartwatches and fitness trackers are subject to applicable security regulations. Authorized watch and fitness tracker colors when in uniform are solid black, brown, dark green, grey, navy blue, tan, white, copper, gold (metal), silver (metal), gold and silver combination (metal) only.

7. TATTOOS/BODY ART/BRANDS. Four criteria will be used to determine whether tattoos/body art/brands are permitted for Navy personnel: content, location, size and cosmetic. Failure to comply with established acceptable tattoo criteria as stated, is a violation of uniform policy and subject to disciplinary action to include involuntary separation.

a. Content: Tattoos/body art/brands located anywhere on the body that are prejudicial to good order, discipline, and morale or are of a nature to bring discredit upon the naval service are prohibited. For example, tattoos/body art/brands that are obscene, sexually explicit, and or advocate discrimination based on sex, race, religion, ethnic, sexual orientation or national origin are prohibited. In addition, tattoos/body art/brands that symbolize affiliation with gangs, supremacist or extremist groups, or advocate illegal drug use are prohibited.

b. Location: No tattoos/body art/brands on the head, face (to include ear) and scalp.

One tattoo is authorized on the neck and should not exceed one inch in measurement in any direction. Tattoos/body art/brands meeting these requirements are acceptable behind the ear. Permissible tattoos/body art/brands on the torso area of the body shall not be visible through white uniform clothing.

c. Size: The size restriction for visible tattoos/body art/brands is limited to the area of the neck and behind the ear only. As a result of this change leg and arm tattoos can be of any size. Tattoos/body art/brands on the neck or behind the ear will not exceed one inch in measurement in any dimension (height/width).

d. Cosmetic: Cosmetic tattoo is authorized to correct medical conditions requiring such treatment. For the purpose of this regulation, cosmetic tattooing refers to medical or surgical procedures conducted by licensed, qualified medical personnel.

8. MUTILATION. Intentional mutilation of any part of the body is prohibited. Mutilation, is defined as the intentional radical alteration of the body, head, face, or skin for the purpose of and or resulting in an abnormal appearance.

a. Examples of mutilation include, but are not limited to:

(1) A split or forked tongue;

(2) Foreign objects inserted under the skin to create a design or pattern;

(3) Enlarged or stretched out holes in ears (other than a normal piercing);

(4) Intentional scarring on neck, face, or scalp; or

(5) Intentional burns creating a design or pattern.

9. DENTAL ORNAMENTATION. The use of gold, platinum, or other veneers or caps for purposes of dental ornamentation is prohibited. For purposes of this regulation, ornamentation is defined as decorative veneers or caps. Teeth, whether natural, capped, or veneered, will not be ornamented with designs, jewels, initials, etc.

10. NAVY PERSONNEL WITH WAIVERABLE PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS. Tattoos/body art/brands/mutilation/dental ornamentation may be waived if they existed prior to 24 January 2003 and are not prejudicial to good order, discipline, and morale or are of a nature to bring discredit upon the naval service. Officer and enlisted accessions who meet eligibility requirements may only be granted a tattoo waiver by Commander, Navy Recruiting Command. Waivers with a description and photo of the tattoo being waived will be documented on DD FORM 1966/4 or Administrative Remarks (NAVPERS 1070/613) and entered into the member’s service record.

11. NAVY PERSONNEL WITH NON-WAIVERABLE PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS. If removal or alteration of tattoos/body art/brands/mutilation/dental ornamentation is determined by a military medical healthcare provider not to be feasible, the member may be processed for involuntary separation, if deemed appropriate by the commanding officer.

Can I Get Natural Looking Eyelash Extensions?

Can I Get Natural Looking Eyelash Extensions? Eyelash Extensions Jennifer Ngo at January 4th, 2019

Can you get natural looking eyelash extensions? Yes! A natural set is extremely achievable with the right eyelash artist. A natural set of eyelash extensions can be achieved by getting a classic set of lashes and sometimes a half set of classic lashes. A classic set of lashes refers to the individual one on one application of one eyelash extension per natural lash. In the event you have a good number of lashes already and think an extension on every lash would be too much, you can opt of a half set of classic lashes. A half set of classic lashes entails covering about 50% of your natural lashes with extensions. This process blends the extensions for a uniform subtle look. Eyelash extensions are meant to be uniform and natural looking. There is much versatility in the eyelash extension industry since its infancy, however, the classic set of one eyelash extension to one natural lash will provide the most natural look. With eyelash extensions, you can feel comfortable knowing your lashes don’t look like strip lashes and you can choose how bold you want to go. The natural look is actually the easiest look to achieve! Your artist can enhance your natural eyelash beauty in one session. The end result will look as if your natural lashes had a subtle change in length and thickness. Yes, it is possible to have both natural and perfect looking lashes that bring out the best in your eyes!

Army Tightens Rules On Hair, Tattoos, Makeup

Senior leaders are putting the final touches on 17 grooming regulation changes that cover everything from tattoos and makeup to cellphones and civilian attire

(MILITARY TIMES) –Senior leaders are putting the final touches on 17 grooming regulation changes that cover everything from tattoos and makeup to cellphones and civilian attire. And soldiers will likely face punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice if they fail to get squared away.

The pending changes include:

• Shorter sideburns.

• Soldiers must be clean shaven on and off duty, even during leave.

• Women will be allowed to put hair into ponytails during physical training.

• Men will be prohibited from wearing cosmetics, to include nail polish.

• Women may wear cosmetics “conservatively.” That means no unnatural or exaggerated appearance, and no more fake eyelashes. Nail polish will only be worn in service, mess or dress uniforms.

• Women’s fingernail length will not exceed a quarter of an inch. No fake nails, add-ons or extensions will be authorized.

• Tattoos will not be visible above the neck line when the physical fitness uniform is worn. Tattoos will not extend below the wrist line and not be visible on the hands. Sleeve tattoos will be prohibited. (This rule may be grandfathered.)

• Soldiers will not eat, drink, smoke, or talk on cellphones while walking.

• Army Combat Uniforms will not be commercially pressed; only hand ironing will be authorized.

• Bags worn over the shoulder must be black or the color print of the uniform, without logos.

• Hair grooming standards will become more restrictive and better defined.

• No visible body piercings will be allowed on or off duty. Males will not be allowed to wear earrings at any time. Ear gauging will be unauthorized.

• Civilian clothes standards, both on and off post, will be better defined.

• No dental ornamentation or gold teeth will be authorized.

• Soldiers will be authorized to wear authorized ballistic eyewear in garrison.

• Officers will be authorized to wear nonsubdued rank on their headgear in garrison.

• Men will be authorized to carry a black umbrella with the Army Service Uniform.

The pending changes are part of a comprehensive review of Army Regulation 670-1 led by Sergeant Major of the Army Raymond Chandler. While some soldiers have voiced opposition to such changes, Chandler has reiterated that his goal is to project a uniform and professional Army.

“You chose to join the Army,” Chandler said. “The Army didn’t choose to join you.”

Final tweaking will take place later this month when Chandler meets with his board of directors, which is composed of key command sergeants major. Final approval must come from Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno and Secretary John McHugh.

The chief is aware of all proposals, and his questions and comments thus far have focused on the issue of enforcement, Chandler said.

The new rules are neither a part of drawdown nor a tool of attrition, the sergeant major said. Instead, this is a concerted effort to project professionalism in the Army uniform and brand, and give soldiers the tools they need to educate troops and enforce the standards.

Administration and legal experts are scouring the list for legality and context. Chandler said changes must be feasible, affordable and reasonable. Some changes are not clear, as leaders have yet to determine whether a new rule is needed, or regulations can instead be better defined.

Sideburns are one example. Some soldiers have “pushed the envelope” with pointy tips and mutton chops that would make Elvis envious. Leaders responded with a new regulation that would not allow sideburns to extend below the spot where your ear connects with your head. Chandler wants to know whether that extreme is necessary, or whether clarity and stronger enforcement of the current regulation could solve the problem.

Other changes are easier to define. Chandler gave an example of a senior sergeant major who dyed her eyebrows blond. She was black, and this was clearly not her natural hair color. Another soldier tried to convince the SMA that her purple hair was actually auburn – a natural color – and therefore acceptable.

This much is certain: The Army will demand greater education and enforcement of the rules, new and old.

TATTOOS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Rules regarding civilian attire are also under scrutiny. New regulations could follow the Marine Corps’ example and put defined rules on what you can – and must – wear when off duty. Or the Army could frame this matter as professional development, and thus convey an expectation of how a soldier should look.

But you can expect, at the least, tighter restrictions on what you wear on post.

“Bathing suits and midriffs are not OK in the post exchange and commissary,” Chandler told a gathering of 600-plus soldiers at Fort Jackson, S.C., earlier this year. “I don’t want to see all that.”

He has been equally vocal on the issue of tattoos, especially those above the neck line or containing vulgarities.

“The appearance of tattoos detracts from a uniformed service,” Chandler told the Fort Jackson soldiers. “The uniformed services, we all generally look the same. Now, if you have a tattoo that draws attention to yourself, you have to ask the question, are you a person who is committed to the Army? Because the Army says you are part of the same organization. We all generally look the same. And we do not want you to stand out from the rest of the Army. Yes, we want you to set yourself apart and do great things and so on, but that does not mean tattooing yourself or doing other extreme things that draw attention to you, the individual. You are part of something larger.”

Chandler listed a number of examples of inappropriate tattoos he has seen in the past nine months. Every one was on a noncommissioned officer who was inked while on active duty.

While waivers allowed some people to enter with tattoos of this nature, soldiers have never been allowed to get them while on active duty.

Even worse in Chandler’s eyes is the fact that none of the soldiers he used as examples were counseled for their error.

Chandler, and many other senior leaders, said these tattoos should be removed if the soldier wants to remain on active duty.

Im curious because ive been seeing it a lot lately with females in uniform, are fake eyelashes authorized while in uniform?

Not to be persnickety about the wording (but it’s where loopholes are found) fake eyelashes and extensions are two different things. Fake eyelashes are not a permanent treatment, I would akin them to acrylic nails that are in regulation. Fake lashes can be put on and off at home. Eyelash extensions are a semi-permanent treatment you have to get done professionally. Granted I don’t do either because they’re a pain and expensive but there is a difference.

Air Force Uniform Rules Cleared for Takeoff: Bring on the Lash Extensions

The Air Force released an updated Air Force Instruction (AFI) 36-2903 on December 3. The guidance keeps the uniform changes trend moving forward, this time for Airmen and Guardians dress and appearance regulations. Besides republishing guidance from the Department of the Air Force guidance memorandum for female hair standards and incorporating other needed corrections identified in the AFI, there were also 26 additional changes added in the revised AFI. The Air Force is once again leading the way with changes that service members have been requesting for years and may influence other services to follow suit.

Changes on Hair, Pockets, and Drinking Water while in Uniform

There are so many changes in this updated AFI, but a key adjustment is a loosened focus on Airmen or Guardians putting their hands in their pockets. All military branches have prohibited the practice of putting your hands in your pockets while in uniform, but this is no longer the case. Also, the line preventing service members from talking on a cell phone or drinking water while walking has been removed.

There were also changes around both men and women hair standards. Male bulk hair standards increased from two inches to two- and one-half inches. Cosmetic tattooing on the scalp is authorized for men. The size of hair accessories width for women increased from one inch to two inches for females. And hair dye for all Airmen/Guardians is now authorized.

A major change for women is that false eyelashes are now authorized. They must be natural eyelash color and can not exceed 14 millimeters in length. Women are also no longer required to wear hosiery with dress uniforms – they have the option of wearing it.

The AFI also provided extra clarification regarding both male and female hair color. Stating that if applied, dyes, tints, bleaches, and frostings must result in natural hair colors. Examples of natural hair are brown, blonde, brunette, natural red, and black. Natural blending such as highlights or salt and pepper hair coloring are authorized. And all non-natural hair colors are still not authorized. Further information was provided for beards allowed for medical reasons stating beard length must not exceed ¼ and appear neat and conservative.

Other Uniform Updates Made

Updates relate to the Physical Training Gear (PTG) were also included. Shirt are no longer required to be tucked in. If a PTG shirt is not tucked in, it must extend to the bottom of the side pocket on the shorts or pants but cannot cover the shorts reflective material. Undershirts are still authorized, but they cannot extend longer than untucked PTG. The AFI also authorized the wear of sweatbands with physical training gear. The authorized colors are black, white, or dark blue with an Air Force symbol or U.S. Air Force painted/embroidered on the front.

There are also a number of changes around uniform wear. One of the biggest highlights is the authorization of commanders able to allow the tucking of Operational Camouflaged patterns (OCP) coat for duty as necessary and folding the cuff twice inward. An OCP tactical cap is also now authorized. There was also various information provided for patches, pen/pencil holders and specialized instructions for various units and specialized badges or tabs. You can read the full AFI here and page three highlights the new changes.

AR 670-1: 3-2. Hair and Fingernail Standards and Grooming Policies

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Note: This paragraph is punitive with regard to Soldiers. Violation by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ.

Hair

General. The requirement for hair grooming standards is necessary to maintain uniformity within a military population. Many hairstyles are acceptable, as long as they are neat and conservative. It is the responsibility of leaders at all levels to exercise good judgment when enforcing Army policy. All Soldiers will comply with hair, fingernail, and grooming policies while in any military uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty.

Leaders will judge the appropriateness of a particular hairstyle by the guidance in this chapter and by the ability to wear all types of headgear (such as beret, patrol cap, or service cap/hat) and any protective equipment (such as protective mask or combat helmet) properly. Hairstyles (including bulk and length of hair) that do not allow Soldiers to wear any headgear properly, or that interfere with the proper wear of any protective equipment, are prohibited. Headgear will fit snugly and comfortably, without bulging or distortion from the intended shape of the headgear and without excessive gaps. Hairstyles that pose a health or safety hazard are not authorized.

Extreme, eccentric, or faddish haircuts or hairstyles are not authorized. If Soldiers use dyes, tints, or bleaches, they must choose a natural hair color. Colors that detract from a professional military appearance are prohibited. Therefore, Soldiers must avoid using colors that result in an extreme appearance. Applied hair colors that are prohibited include, but are not limited to, purple, blue, pink, green, orange, bright (fire-engine) red, and fluorescent or neon colors. It is the responsibility of leaders to use good judgment in determining if applied colors are acceptable, based upon the overall effect on a Soldier’s appearance.

If Soldiers use dyes, tints, or bleaches, they must choose a natural hair color. Colors that detract from a professional military appearance are prohibited. Therefore, Soldiers must avoid using colors that result in an extreme appearance. Applied hair colors that are prohibited include, but are not limited to, purple, blue, pink, green, orange, bright (fire-engine) red, and fluorescent or neon colors. It is the responsibility of leaders to use good judgment in determining if applied colors are acceptable, based upon the overall effect on a Soldier’s appearance. Soldiers who have a texture of hair that does not part naturally may cut a part into the hair or style the hair with one part. The part will be one straight line, not slanted or curved, and will fall in the area where the Soldier would normally part the hair. Soldiers will not shape or cut designs into their hair or scalp.

Male haircuts

The hair on top of the head must be neatly groomed. The length and bulk of the hair may not be excessive and must present a neat and conservative appearance.

The hair must present a tapered appearance. A tapered appearance is one where the outline of the Soldier’s hair conforms to the shape of the head (see scalp line in figure 3–1), curving inward to the natural termination point at the base of the neck.

When the hair is combed, it will not fall over the ears or eyebrows, or touch the collar, except for the closely cut hair at the back of the neck. The block-cut fullness in the back is permitted to a moderate degree, as long as the tapered look is maintained.

Males are not authorized to wear braids, cornrows, twists, dreadlocks, or locks while in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty. Haircuts with a single, untapered patch of hair on the top of the head (not consistent with natural hair loss) are considered eccentric and are not authorized. Examples include, but are not limited to, when the head is shaved around a strip of hair down the center of the head (mohawk), around a u-shaped hair area (horseshoe), or around a patch of hair on the front top of the head (tear drop).

Hair that is completely shaved or trimmed closely to the scalp is authorized. (See figs 3–1 and 3–2.)

Sideburns.

Sideburns are hair grown in front of the ear and below the point where the top portion of the ear attaches to the head. Sideburns will not extend below the bottom of the opening of the ear (see line A of fig 3–1). Sideburns will not be styled to taper, flair, or come to a point. The length of the individual hairs of the sideburn will not exceed 1/8 inch when fully extended.

Facial hair.

Males will keep their face clean-shaven when in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty. Mustaches are permitted. If worn, males will keep mustaches neatly trimmed, tapered, and tidy. Mustaches will not present a chopped off or bushy appearance, and no portion of the mustache will cover the upper lip line, extend sideways beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corners of the mouth (see lines C and D of fig 3–1), or extend above a parallel line at the lowest portion of the nose (see line B of fig 3–1). Handlebar mustaches, goatees, and beards are not authorized. If appropriate medical authority allows beard growth, the maximum length authorized for medical treatment must be specific. For example, “The length of the beard cannot exceed 1/4 inch” (see Training Bulletin Medical (TB Med) 287). Soldiers will keep the growth trimmed to the level specified by the appropriate medical authority, but are not authorized to shape the hair growth (examples include, but are not limited to goatees, “Fu Manchu,” or handlebar mustaches).

Wigs and hairpieces.

Males are prohibited from wearing wigs or hairpieces while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty, except to cover natural baldness or physical disfiguration caused by accident or medical procedure. When worn, wigs or hairpieces will conform to the standard haircut criteria, as stated within this regulation.

Female haircuts and hairstyles

The illustrations provided in figure 3–3 are intended only to clarify language regarding authorized hair lengths and bulks. The requirements for hair regulations are to maintain uniformity within a military population for female Soldiers while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty, unless otherwise specified.

Female hairstyles may not be eccentric or faddish and will present a conservative, professional appearance. For the purpose of these regulations, female hairstyles are organized into three basic categories: short length, medium length, and long length hair.

Short length

Short hair is defined as hair length that extends no more than 1 inch from the scalp (excluding bangs). Hair may be no shorter than 1/4 inch from the scalp (unless due to medical condition or injury), but may be evenly tapered to the scalp within 2 inches of the hair line edges. Bangs, if worn, may not fall below the eyebrows, may not interfere with the wear of all headgear, must lie neatly against the head, and not be visible underneath the front of the headgear. The width of the bangs may extend to the hairline at the temple.

Medium length

Medium hair is defined as hair length that does not extend beyond the lower edge of the collar (in all uniforms), and extends more than 1 inch from the scalp. Medium hair may fall naturally in uniform, and is not required to be secured. When worn loose, graduated hair styles are acceptable, but the length, as measured from the end of the total hair length to the base of the collar, may not exceed 1 inch difference in length, from the front to the back. Layered hairstyles are also authorized, so long as each hair’s length, as measured from the scalp to the hair’s end, is generally the same length giving a tapered appearance. The regulations for the wear of bangs detailed in paragraph 3–2a(a), apply. No portion of the bulk of the hair, as measured from the scalp, will exceed 2 inches.

Long length

Long hair is defined as hair length that extends beyond the lower edge of the collar. Long hair will be neatly and inconspicuously fastened or pinned above the lower edge of the collar (except when worn in accordance with para 3–2a(j)), except that bangs may be worn. The regulations for the wear of bangs detailed in paragraph 3–2a(3)(a) apply. No portion of the bulk of the hair, as measured from the scalp as styled, will exceed 2 inches (except a bun, which is worn on the back of the head and may extend a maximum of 3 1/2 inches from the scalp and be no wider than the width of the head).

Additional hairstyle guidelines

Faddish and exaggerated styles, to include shaved portions of the scalp other than the neckline, designs cut in the hair, unsecured ponytails (except during physical training), and unbalanced or lopsided hairstyles are prohibited. Hair will be styled so as not to interfere with the proper wear of all uniform headgear. All headgear will fit snugly and comfortably around the largest part of the head without bulging or distortion from the intended shape of the headgear and without excessive gaps. When headgear is worn, hair should not protrude at distinct angles from under the edges. Hairstyles that do not allow the headgear to be worn in this manner are prohibited. Examples of hairstyles considered to be faddish or exaggerated and thus not authorized for wear while in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty include, but are not limited to hair sculpting (eccentric texture or directional flow of any hairstyle to include spiking); buns with loose hair extending at the end; hair styles with severe angles or designs; and loose unsecured hair (not to include bangs) when medium and long hair are worn up.

Devices

Hair holding devices are authorized only for the purpose of securing the hair. Soldiers will not place hair holding devices in the hair for decorative purposes. All hair holding devices must be plain and of a color as close to the Soldier’s hair as is possible or clear. Authorized devices include, but are not limited to, small plain scrunchies (elastic hair bands covered with material), barrettes, combs, pins, clips, rubber bands, and hair/head bands. Such devices should conform to the natural shape of the head. Devices that are conspicuous, excessive, or decorative are prohibited. Some examples of prohibited devices include, but are not limited to: large, lacy scrunchies; beads, bows, or claw or alligator clips; clips, pins, or barrettes with butterflies, flowers, sparkles, gems, or scalloped edges; and bows made from hairpieces. Foreign material (for example, beads and decorative items) will not be used in the hair. Soldiers may not wear hairnets unless they are required for health or safety reasons, or in the performance of duties (such as those in a dining facility). No other type of hair covering is authorized in lieu of the hairnet. The commander will provide the hairnet at no cost to the Soldier.

Braids, cornrows, and twists

Medium and long hair may be styled with braids, cornrows, or twists (see glossary for definitions). Each braid, cornrow, or twist will be of uniform dimension, have a diameter no greater than 1/2 inch, and present a neat, professional, and well-groomed appearance. Each must have the same approximate size of spacing between the braids, cornrows, or twists. Each hairstyle may be worn against the scalp or loose (free-hanging). When worn loose, such hairstyles must be worn per medium hair length guidelines or secured to the head in the same manner as described for medium or long length hair styles. Ends must be secured inconspicuously. When multiple loose braids or twists are worn, they must encompass the whole head. When braids, twists, or cornrows are not worn loosely and instead worn close to the scalp, they may stop at one consistent location of the head and must follow the natural direction of the hair when worn back, which is either in general straight lines following the shape of the head or flowing with the natural direction of the hair when worn back with one primary part in the hair (see para 3–2a(1)(c)). Hairstyles may not be styled with designs, sharply curved lines, or zigzag lines. Only one distinctive style (braided, rolled, or twisted) may be worn at one time. Braids, cornrows, or twists that distinctly protrude (up or out) from the head are not authorized.

Dreadlocks or locks

Any style of dreadlock or lock (against the scalp or free-hanging) is not authorized (see glossary for definition).

Hair extensions

Hair extensions are authorized. Extensions must have the same general appearance as the individual’s natural hair and otherwise conform to this regulation.

Wigs

Wigs, if worn in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty, must look natural and conform to this regulation. Wigs are not authorized to cover up unauthorized hairstyles.

Physical training

Long length hair, as defined in paragraph 3–2a(3)(c), may be worn in a pony tail during physical training. A single pony tail centered on the back of the head is authorized in physical fitness uniforms only when within the scope of physical training, except when considered a safety hazard. The pony tail is not required to be worn above the collar. When hair securing devices are worn, they will comply with the guidelines set in paragraph

3–2a(3)(e). Hairstyles otherwise authorized in this chapter (such as braids and twists) may also be worn in a pony tail during physical training.

Physical training in utility uniforms

Pony tails are authorized using guidelines set forth in paragraph 3–2a(3)(j), while conducting physical training in utility uniforms. However, if the helmet is worn during physical training, hair must be secured using guidelines in paragraph 3–2a(3)(a) through (k).

Cosmetics & Makeup

Standards regarding cosmetics are necessary to maintain uniformity and to avoid an extreme or unprofessional appearance. Males are prohibited from wearing cosmetics, except when medically prescribed. Females are authorized to wear cosmetics with all uniforms, provided they are applied modestly and conservatively, and that they complement both the Soldier’s complexion and the uniform. Leaders at all levels must exercise good judgment when interpreting and enforcing this policy.

Eccentric, exaggerated, or faddish cosmetic styles and colors, to include makeup designed to cover tattoos, are inappropriate with the uniform and are prohibited. Permanent makeup, such as eyebrow or eyeliner, is authorized as long as the makeup conforms to the standards outlined above. Eyelash extensions are not authorized unless medically prescribed.

Females will not wear shades of lipstick that distinctly contrast with the natural color of their lips, that detract from the uniform, or that are faddish, eccentric, or exaggerated.

Females will comply with the cosmetics policy while in any military uniform or while in civilian clothes on duty.

Fingernails

All personnel will keep fingernails clean and neatly trimmed. Males will keep nails trimmed so as not to extend beyond the fingertip unless medically required and are not authorized to wear nail polish. Females will not exceed a nail length of 1⁄4 inch as measured from the tip of the finger. Females will trim nails shorter if the commander determines that the longer length detracts from a professional appearance, presents a safety concern, or interferes with the performance of duties. Females may only wear clear polish when in uniform or while in civilian

clothes on duty. Females may wear clear acrylic nails, provided they have a natural appearance and conform to Army standards.

Hygiene and body grooming

Soldiers will maintain good personal hygiene and grooming on a daily basis and wear the uniform so as not to detract from their overall military appearance.

4 most annoying regulations for women in the military

It might seem that women would have it easy when it comes to regulations in the military — I mean, how hard is it to stick your hair in a bun, slip on your boots, and head out the door?

It’s actually pretty restricting once you realize how many regulations are placed on women in the military.

Granted, regulations are nothing new, and everyone has to follow them, but let’s take a look at a few that women in all branches of service have to abide by on a daily basis.

4. Hair

Women’s hair must be professional and steer clear of unnatural colors and eccentric styles. Yes, this means no fad hairstyles, no blinged out barrettes and bobby pins, which makes sense, to an extent. This regulation might be the hardest for women to comply with because the description is so broad and is ultimately up to the interpretation of supervisors to potentially escalate a breach of regulation (“No sir, my hair is not red — it’s Auburn”).

Heck, sometimes it might just be easier to chop it all off like GI Jane (newsflash that’s against regs too, no buzz cuts for women!). Looks like a bun it is!

3. Nails

Nails might seem like a menial regulation to gripe about, but it becomes tedious when supervisors are out to get you for anything that they can. Regulations call for natural nail polish, and the length must be no longer than ¼ of an inch. Imagine being called into a supervisor’s office for your nails being too long or wearing too pink of a polish. It happens to women in the military more often than you would think.

I like where your head’s at, but it’s still a no. (Photo via MarineLP)

2. Makeup

Women must not wear makeup that isn’t flattering to their skin tone or unnatural. Again, this regulation is so broad that it allows for misinterpretation or someone to deem others choice in makeup “unnatural.” Everyone has his or her own opinion of what natural and unnatural makeup looks like, and it’s hard to pin this one down.

Of course, there’s no blue eye shadow or purple eyeliner (duh), but there are many shades that are open to interpretation. Women usually adapt and figure out that no makeup, or close to no makeup, is the best way to stay out of trouble in this area.

Go with this look to play it safe.

1. Nametag/ Ribbon Rack Alignment

Nametag and ribbon rack alignment might be one of the most annoying regulations of them all. Men have pockets on their formal shirts to align their nametag and ribbon rack perfectly. Women don’t get pockets on their formal button-down shirts, and it makes it almost impossible to align because of the nuisance of, well, boobs.

Everyone should just wear flight suits.

Every woman has them and some more than others, which makes uniform wear, and abiding by small details frustrating. Women usually go to the lengths of sewing dots onto their shirts once they find the perfect alignment, because who knows if they’ll ever find that sweet spot again!

Props to all the women in the military who put up with these regulations and don’t let the details impede on their work performance, even though they might want to say shove it to their supervisors when they get called out for their eyelash extensions or the length of their fingernails.

Your Guide to Army Grooming Standards (Including Latest Changes)

Army grooming standards rarely change, so it’s a big deal when they do. Updates to Army Regulation (AR) 670, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, and the new ALARACT 40/2021, U.S. Army Appearance and Grooming Modifications, brought significant changes in 2021. In 2022, the Army updated its tattoo policy.

What Is the Purpose of AR 670-1?

AR 670-1 prescribes uniform and grooming standards for Army personnel. According to Paragraph 1-1, “The Army is a profession. A soldier’s appearance measures part of their professionalism.”

In other words, AR 670-1 exists to show soldiers how to look like soldiers. The standards outlined in AR 670-1 change over time to reflect changing views of what society considers appropriate and professional

What Are the New Army Grooming Standards?

The Army published its most recent version of AR 670-1 on Jan 26, 2021. In May 2021, the Army published ALARACT 040/2021, which contained further grooming standards changes.

According to the ALARACT, the next release of AR 670-1 will incorporate these changes.

Why Did AR 670-1 Change?

According to an information paper posted by Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel Lt. Gen. Gary Brito’s office, the update is part of the Army’s efforts to promote diversity and inclusion.

Here is a summary of some of the recent changes:

Removed the minimum hair length for males and females

Allowed hairstyles include multiple hairstyles and ponytails for females and highlights for males and females

Allowed earrings in all uniforms for females

Allowed nail polish and lipstick for females

Allowed clear nail polish for males

Increased allowed religious accommodations, including for beards and mustaches

Removed potentially offensive language to describe hairstyles and beards

Here’s more about the new changes and some things that have stayed the same.

Army Hair Regulations

The most significant changes are new regulations increasing the variety of acceptable hairstyles for female soldiers.

New Army Female Hair Regulations

The newest regulations give women greater freedom to choose hairstyles previously banned by the Army. Previous hair regulations disproportionately impacted soldiers with textured hair, including women of color.

Ponytails and Braids

The grooming standard changes make it easier and safer for women to secure natural hair of all types in garrison and combat headgear. Previous hairstyle regulations that required soldiers to wear long hair in a tight bun damaged soldiers’ hair and scalps. Buns also made wearing helmets and other tactical gear more challenging.

Women can now wear ponytails in every uniform. They can keep their hair in buns, single ponytails, single braids or two braids. They can also wear locs, twists and cornrows.

Women must wear braids and ponytails down the center of their backs. Braids and ponytails can not extend past the bottom of their shoulder blades when standing at attention.

The Army also repealed its ban on “multiple hairstyles” so women can combine cornrows, twists, braids and locs.

Short Authorized Hairstyles for Female Soldiers

In another change, the Army removed minimum hair lengths for women, which used to be ¼ inch. Women can also cut their hair in tapered styles (i.e., in a fashion that conforms to the shape of their heads).

Parts

Women can part their hair. If their hair does not part naturally, they can cut parts into it if they follow these criteria:

Parts can’t exceed three millimeters in width (about 1/10 of an inch).

Parts must be straight lines, not zigzag or other shapes.

Hard parts must be cut into a natural part of the scalp (where a part would naturally occur).

No more than two inches of hair length can protrude from a soldier’s head in tactical and physical training environments. Buns can not exceed three and a half inches.

When wearing tactical equipment such as an advanced combat helmet (ACH), commanders may order soldiers to tuck their ponytails into their utility tops.

Highlights

Female soldiers can now wear highlights in their hair if the colors blend together naturally without a “vast difference” between the shades.

Highlights also can’t be unnatural colors, such as purple, blue, green, pink, bright red, fluorescent or neon.

Army Male Hair Regulations

Male soldiers can also wear highlights if they follow the standards listed above. The new grooming standards also allow them to shave their hair shorter than ¼ inch.

All other Army male hair regulations remain the same, including the following:

Men must neatly groom their hair.

Hair must have a tapered appearance.

Hair can not be below the ears and eyebrows or touch the collar.

ALARACT 40/2021 removes offensive language previously used to describe hairstyles, including “Mohawk” and “dreadlock.”

Army Beard and Mustache Regulations

Though there has been recent talk of loosening beard policy, the Army has not yet revised its longstanding policies banning beards and restricting mustaches as of the latest round of updates.

Here are the current grooming requirements for mustaches and beards:

Mustaches

According to Paragraph 3-2 of AR 670-1, mustaches can not extend past the corners of the mouth (imagine a vertical line drawn upward from the corners of the mouth). Also, soldiers must keep mustaches below the lowest part of the nose.

Soldiers must trim their mustaches above the upper lip line and keep them tapered and tidy. Additionally, regulations prohibit a “chopped off” or “bushy” appearance.

Religious Accommodations

Soldiers may request religious accommodations to wear beards, turbans and hijabs, according to AR 670-1. Paragraph 5-6 of AR 600-20, the Army Command Policy, covers submission requests for religious accommodation.

Soldiers with approved religious accommodations for beards must follow the guidelines in Paragraph 3-16 of AR 670-1. Religious beards must be shorter than two inches, or soldiers must roll or tie them to under two inches to comply with regulations.

Soldiers with religious accommodations can grow their mustaches to connect with their beards, but they must trim or groom mustaches to keep them above upper lip lines. In addition, soldiers can not shape their facial hair into goatees, handlebar mustaches or other styles.

Medical Exemptions

A soldier’s medical exemption to the Army’s beard policy must specify the maximum length of the beard. Soldiers can not use medical exemptions to grow shaped beard styles like goatees and handlebar mustaches.

Army Piercing and Tattoo Regulations

Army women can now wear studded earrings in the Army combat uniform (ACU) unless in a field or tactical environment.

ALARACT 40/2021 restricts earrings to gold, silver or clear diamond. While in service or dress uniforms, female soldiers can also wear pearl earrings.

Earrings can’t be larger than six millimeters or ¼ inch in diameter. They must be “plain” and either round or square. Regulations prohibit hoop and drop earrings.

Women can wear only one earring per earlobe, and they must match. They can not wear earrings on other parts of the ear while in uniform or on duty.

Other Piercing Regulations

These existing policies on piercings remain in effect:

Men can’t wear earrings while on duty or in uniform.

Regulations forbid earrings that support “ear gauging,” which the Army defines as creating earlobe holes greater than 1.6 millimeters (1/16 of an inch).

No restrictions apply to the type of earrings male and female soldiers can wear when off duty and not in uniform.

Tattoo Regulations

Tattoo regulations apply to both male and female soldiers. In 2015, the Army updated its tattoo policies to open the ranks to the 41% of millennials with at least one tattoo. Here’s the current tattoo and brand policy: The Army bans extremist, indecent, racist and sexist tattoos no matter where they are on the body.

Regulations restrict tattoos on the head, face, neck and hands below the wrist. Here’s what is allowed, according to a June 2022 memo signed by Secretary of the Army Christine Wormuth. Women can have conservative permanent makeup-like eyeliner and eyebrow liner. Men and women can have one tattoo that is less than an inch in diameter on each hand, as well as one ring tattooed on each hand. Soldiers may wear unlimited tattoos between their fingers as long as they remain unseen when their fingers are closed. Soldiers may have one tattoo on the back of your neck, provided it is less than two inches in diameter.

Soldiers with a previously approved tattoo memos do not violate current policy.

Army Religious Garments Regulations

Here’s a summary of the rules for religious garments while in uniform:

Soldiers can wear religious jewelry but must conform to the standards for non-religious jewelry.

Religious bracelets must be similar to ID bracelets in size, appearance and color (black or silver).

Soldiers can wear any other religious items under their uniforms. The portion of any neck chain that appears outside of the collar must be no thicker than a standard ID chain.

Soldiers can wear religious items in uniform during religious services, though commanders may restrict non-subdued items in a field environment.

Religious head coverings must be in conservative colors (black, brown, green, dark blue), and standard military headgear must be able to cover it.

Hijabs

Soldiers can wear hijabs when they have an approved religious accommodation request. The hijab must be subdued in color or ACU-compatible camouflage and present a neat appearance. Soldiers must wear hijabs under any required headgear, and they must tuck the bottom of the hijab in the uniform top.

In a field or tactical environment, commanders may require hijabs to be fire-resistant.

Turbans and Under-Turbans

Soldiers with an approved religious accommodation request can wear turbans and under-turbans. Here is a summary of how they should wear them:

Turbans must be in a similar color as the worn uniform. For instance, when in ACUs (formerly called the OCP), turbans should be of a matching camouflage color and pattern. In units with special headgear – like maroon, tan or green berets – commanders may require that turbans match these colors.

When worn, turbans replace other military headgear.

Turbans should display rank in approximately the same place as standard headgear.

Hair under turbans does not have to follow AR 670-1 regulations, but it must not touch the ears or uniform collar or fall below the eyebrows.

Other Religious Uniform Standards

Soldiers with religious accommodations can wear long-sleeved Army physical fitness uniform (APFU) tops and subdued leggings under APFU shorts. The material of the leggings may not contain logos, patterns or be otherwise obtrusive.

Army Eyeglasses, Sunglasses and Contact Lenses Regulations

There are no changes to policies regarding eyewear. Here are the current regulations:

Eyeglasses must be conservative in design and can not be trendy or have initials or designs that stand out.

Soldiers may not wear sunglasses indoors unless required by a medical authority.

Sunglass lenses can only be brown, gray or dark green.

Soldiers can not affix chains or ribbons to eyewear except for restraints when required for safety purposes.

Contact lenses can not be tinted to change eye color or shape, but medical authorities may prescribe opaque lenses for specific medical conditions.

Army Jewelry Regulations

Soldiers can only wear the following visible jewelry:

Wristwatches

Religious bracelets

ID bracelets

One item per wrist, except for pedometers, activity trackers or heart-rate monitors, which soldiers can wear with a watch or bracelet on the same wrist

Two rings (a wedding-ring set is considered one ring)

Conservative tie tack or clasp (men)

Earrings, as described above (women)

Pens and pencils of any color in uniform slots prescribed for that purpose

The following restrictions apply to jewelry, even when not visible:

Men and women can’t wear piercings anywhere but their earlobes, on- or off-duty.

Dental ornamentation is not allowed, including gold caps and platinum caps.

Army Nail Regulations

According to ALARACT 40/2021, female soldiers can now wear “solid color shades of nail polish that are not extreme.”

Here is what’s allowed under the new nail regulations:

Nude or natural nail polish

American manicure (a nail design with contrasting neutral tips)

Light pink

Maximum nail length of ¼ inch from the tip of the finger

Here are some things that are not allowed:

Extreme nail shapes, including ballerina, stiletto, arrow and coffin

Extreme colors, such as purple; white; yellow; gold; hot, bright or fluorescent/neon colors

Ombre or extreme two-toned colors

French manicure (a nail design with a contrasting white tip)

For the first time, men can wear clear nail polish. They must still trim their nails so they do not extend beyond their fingertips.

Army Makeup Regulations

Unless medically prescribed, men still can not wear makeup.

These makeup policies apply to female soldiers:

Women can wear makeup in all uniforms.

Makeup should be modest and conservative.

Women can’t wear eyelash extensions without a medical prescription.

Lipstick can not distinctly contrast with lip color.

Breastfeeding Women

With the latest 670-1 update, the Army explicitly allows breastfeeding women to do the following:

Wear an optional T-shirt designed for that purpose (also applies if pumping)

Unzip or remove ACU coat or other dress/service uniform jackets when actively breastfeeding

Unbutton shirts when breastfeeding

Breastfeed anywhere where mother and child are authorized to be

Not cover themselves or their child when breastfeeding

Who Does AR 670-1 Apply To?

To borrow a phrase from basic training, AR 670-1 applies to “Ladee, dadee, everybody.”

Specifically, it applies to the following:

Regular Army

Army National Guard

Army civilians

Veterans

Reserve Officer Training Corps

West Point Cadets

AR 670-1 does not apply to chiefs of staff, who can decide their own uniforms.

Does AR 670-1 Apply to Retirees?

Yes! AR 670-1 applies to retirees when they wear their Army uniforms.

Paragraph 22-3 of AR 670-1 describes occasions when retirees can wear uniforms:

Ceremonial events including funerals, memorial services and weddings

Parades on national or state holidays

Other patriotic parades

Ceremonies in which regular Army or reserve units participate

The regulations restrict ceremonial attire to service and dress uniforms only.

Retirees can wear only APFUs combined with civilian clothes outside of Army installations.

If wearing the APFU as a complete uniform, retirees must abide by the standards of AR 670-1, but they can add approved retired shoulder-sleeve insignia and identification badges.

Retirees can wear medals on civilian clothing, affixed in approximately the same place as on their uniforms.

Non-Retired Former Soldiers and Uniforms

Veterans with wartime service who were honorably discharged can also wear uniforms, according to Paragraph 23-4 of AR 670-1.

Those with honorable wartime service can wear their uniforms on ceremonious occasions, like those described for retirees, but they must follow AR 670-1. They can not wear ACUs or APFUs for these occasions.

Regulations entitle former soldiers who served honorably in wartime to wear medals in the same manner described above for retirees.

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