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Can You Wear Deodorant While Breastfeeding | Is It Safe To Wear Deodorant Or Perfume If You Are Breastfeeding? The 100 New Answer

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Especially if you’re going back to work soon after your delivery or are around others, it’s okay to wear deodorant during the breastfeeding process. Just avoid heavily treated ones such as Certain Dri, and consider buying a more natural, organic brand if you can’t go au natural.Infants are exposed to aluminum through human milk (HM), formulas, total-parenteral-nutrition and vaccines. Due to potential risk of toxicity to both infants and women, it has been advised that lactating women decrease their use of aluminum-based products and antiperspirants.Earth Mama’s new deodorant is better deodorant. It’s gentle and organic, and formulated especially for pregnancy, breastfeeding, and sensitive skin.

5 Foods to Limit or Avoid While Breastfeeding
  • Fish high in mercury. …
  • Some herbal supplements. …
  • Alcohol. …
  • Caffeine. …
  • Highly processed foods.

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A doula is a person who provides emotional and physical support to you during your pregnancy and childbirth. Cora’s Corner was developed to help pregnant women and their families during this exciting but challenging experience. In this question we explore some of Cora’s advice and ideas about wearing deodorant or perfume while breast feeding.
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Is Using Deodorant Safe While Breastfeeding?

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Why We Should Choose Safe Deodorant while Breastfeeding

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Can breastfeeding mothers use deodorant?

Infants are exposed to aluminum through human milk (HM), formulas, total-parenteral-nutrition and vaccines. Due to potential risk of toxicity to both infants and women, it has been advised that lactating women decrease their use of aluminum-based products and antiperspirants.

What deodorant is safe while breastfeeding?

Earth Mama’s new deodorant is better deodorant. It’s gentle and organic, and formulated especially for pregnancy, breastfeeding, and sensitive skin.

Why do my armpits smell while breastfeeding?

This underarm sweat and scent is a way for your baby to find their food source aka your breast. It’s worth noting that while a baby’s stomach and digestive tract are very delicate at birth, their sense of smell is fully developed.

What products to avoid while breastfeeding?

5 Foods to Limit or Avoid While Breastfeeding
  • Fish high in mercury. …
  • Some herbal supplements. …
  • Alcohol. …
  • Caffeine. …
  • Highly processed foods.

Does breastfeeding cause body odor?

Breastfeeding. If you’re nursing your baby, your body will emit a stronger smell through your underarm sweat than normal to help your baby find its source of food (2). This is your body’s response to naturally assist your baby in finding the breast, and will begin right after giving birth.

Can I use deodorant while pregnant?

Freshening up with antiperspirant while pregnant is safe for you and your child. Just be mindful of the ingredients listed on the labels. Cleanse your body of heavy metals found in many deodorants, such as aluminum. This common deodorant ingredient clogs your sweat glands to prevent perspiration.

Is aluminum found in breast milk?

They reported that aluminium concentrations were highest in colostrums, at 56.45 ng/mL, decreasing to 36.57 ng/mL in transitional milk, and reaching the lowest concentration in mature milk (13.44 ng/mL) of 60 to 65 days.

Can an antiperspirant be aluminum free?

Aluminum-free antiperspirants don’t exist, but if you’re looking to reduce body odor, you can do so without using an antiperspirant. Deodorants are aluminum-free.

Why do I smell like BO postpartum?

With an increase in sweat, there is a possibility for increased body odor. This is similar to when hormones change during puberty. It’s also nature’s way of helping you bond with your newborn. “A change in a woman’s postpartum scent helps direct a baby toward her for breastfeeding,” adds Dr.

Why do I stink after having a baby?

Lochia is the vaginal discharge you have after giving birth. It contains a mix of blood, mucus and uterine tissue. It has a stale, musty odor like menstrual period discharge and can last several weeks.

How do I get rid of postpartum Bo?

To recap, the options for getting rid of postpartum BO are:
  1. Shower frequently.
  2. Remove extraneous body hair.
  3. Use deodorant.
  4. Hydrate well.
  5. Avoid alcohol.
  6. Use apple cider vinegar.
  7. Apply fresh citrus juice.

What can’t you do while breastfeeding?

You can pass harmful things, like alcohol, drugs and lead, to your baby in breast milk. This can cause serious problems for your baby. Don’t smoke, drink alcohol or use harmful drugs when you’re breastfeeding.

Can I drink 1 cup of coffee while breastfeeding?

It’s recommended to limit your caffeine intake while breastfeeding, as small amounts can pass into your breast milk, building up in your baby over time. Still, up to 300 mg — about 2–3 cups (470–710 ml) of coffee or 3–4 cups (710–946 ml) of tea — per day is generally considered safe.

Can I wear nail polish while breastfeeding?

But when it comes to nail treatments, the amount of toluene that is absorbed through the skin or inhaled from applying nail polish to finger and toe nails is small and not expected to increase the chance of problems for your pregnancy or breastfed baby.

Is B.O. a Breastfeeding Requirement?

It’s bad enough that you’re heavier than you used to be, disheveled from sleepless nights and pulsing with leftover hormones when you’re a new mom, but do you also have to be stinky from body odor? Many new moms worry that they’ll harm their baby by using deodorant during breastfeeding, so they forgo the odor protection and sacrifice the olfactory comfort of the people around them to make sure the baby gets pure milk without any toxins. The concern is absolutely reasonable. Many strong deodorants warn against over-use because the aluminum and other materials get soaked into the blood stream from the underarm.

Unfortunately for your family, passing on the antiperspirants for the duration of your breastfeeding might be a good idea. A recent study shows that cosmetic chemicals from deodorant have been found in human breast milk, which is a clear indication that they were soaked into the skin directly from the underarm. When you breastfeed your baby, he or she might directly receive these chemicals with dinner. Few studies have conclusively explored the side effects of these chemicals in the infant’s body, but it’s safe to assume they’re doing more harm than good.

You could find a deodorant that uses only natural ingredients. Though, to be honest, I had a few crunchy roommates in college that swore by Tom’s Natural Deodorant and they might as well not have worn any. I completely understand the appeal, but I think the product is more of a placebo for the wearer. Anyway, natural deodorants are better for your baby’s breast milk, so you should consider talking to your doctor about which chemicals to look for when buying a new one.

As with most baby precautions, thousands of babies grow big and strong despite their mothers’ insistence on wearing deodorant throughout the breastfeeding process, so it’s really up to you whether or not you feel the habit is worth changing. Like I said, research does show that chemicals soak into the breast milk through the underarm, but there isn’t much evidence that states whether or not the chemicals are harmful to a baby or not.

Especially if you’re going back to work soon after your delivery or are around others, it’s okay to wear deodorant during the breastfeeding process. Just avoid heavily treated ones such as Certain Dri, and consider buying a more natural, organic brand if you can’t go au natural.

Source: Philippa Darbre: Underarm Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer. Breast Cancer Research Volume 11 Issue December 2009

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Do I need a Pregnancy or Breastfeeding Deodorant?

Breastfeeding can be so intimate. Snuggled close, your baby’s head nestles right in there – in the crook of your arm where she inhales you with every single breath. Scent is a vital part of mama/baby bonding, so is your baby smelling you, or an artificial scent – one that may even contain hidden ingredients? Plus your skin soaks it all in: what a pregnant or breastfeeding woman puts on her body goes in her baby. And while many pregnant women wouldn’t dream of drinking alcohol, eating sushi, or even dying their hair, they may not give a second thought to their deodorant.

Apart from the usual deodorant suspects, propylene glycol, parabens and aluminum, the ingredient called fragrance still pops up in otherwise “natural” deodorants. “Fragrance” is an ingredient that can hide thousands of undisclosed chemicals – from parabens to phthalates to artificial preservatives. The components of fragrance do not have to be listed – what’s in there is none of your business. Some chemicals in fragrance have been found in umbilical cords and breast milk, some are linked to disruptions in hormonal growth.

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It’s true, our bodies have brilliant filters (cue the lymphatic system!), but why flood them with unknown numbers of unknown chemicals?

Certified organic products that contain organic essential oils smell good naturally, they do not contain fragrance. And that’s a good way to be sure: when you are looking at labels, check for organic certification. The term natural isn’t regulated, but organic is. For instance, Earth Mama’s organic products are either certified to the NOP or the NSF/ANSI 305 organic standards by Oregon Tilth.

Earth Mama deodorants are certified to the NSF/ANSI 305 organic standard and contain organic essential oils that smell good. Earth Mama deodorants don’t contain fragrance. What’s in fragrance? None of your business. There’s no way to know which chemicals are in there. It doesn’t matter if it’s artificial, natural, or fragrance oil, the “fragrance” part is the big question.

Earth Mama’s new deodorant is better deodorant. It’s gentle and organic, and formulated especially for pregnancy, breastfeeding, and sensitive skin. And it actually works. In four flavors: Calming Lavender, Bright Citrus, GingerAid, & Natural Non-Scents, with NO propylene glycol, artificial fragrance, parabens or aluminum. Dermatologist tested and clinically tested for irritation too.

Remember to love your lymph nodes and look for the F word when buying natural deodorant. Make it your business!

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Why Do My Armpits Smell? 9 Tips for Breastfeeding Moms – Lilu

Megan McDonough

Among the many blessings a baby brings, excess sweating is not one of them. After giving birth, your body goes through a process of re-regulating itself and getting back to an equilibrium. You might notice that you’re shedding water weight and that the bloating you had in your hands and feet during pregnancy is subsiding.

The good news is that this process only takes a few months. Still, it’s always good to know what you’re in for!

Night sweats

Whenever you experience night sweats, it’s your body’s way of protecting you against any sort of impurity or imbalance. In the case of postpartum moms, your body is trying to cleanse itself and it’s doing this through your sweat glands. While this can be uncomfortable, sleep easy (no pun intended) knowing that your body is just taking care of you.

Breastfeeding

First off, let’s acknowledge that breastfeeding is truly exercise, so of course you’re going to sweat a little. Don’t forget that breastfeeding can burn around 400 to 500 calories per day, which is no small feat. (pumping is too! You can check out the Lilu Massage Bra to make pumping a little bit easier for yourself).

Lilu Massage Bra View Product

There’s another reason you’re likely to have excess underarm sweat (and emit a stronger smell) and we have evolution to thank. This underarm sweat and scent is a way for your baby to find their food source aka your breast. It’s worth noting that while a baby’s stomach and digestive tract are very delicate at birth, their sense of smell is fully developed.

One of our Lilu moms noticed that her son still smells her when she sweats. “The moment I walk out of the room he’s sleeping in, he begins to cry.” — Maria G.

What is actually happening hormonally?

The short answer? A lot! Hormonal changes during pregnancy and postpartum are unique, so unless you’ve given birth before, this will be your first time experiencing a lot of these fluctuations.

For starters, there’s going to be a sudden increase in estrogen and progesterone and this makes the apocrine sweat much greasier than normal. Apocrine glands are the sweat glands you have in your underarms, breasts, nipples, anal and vaginal regions of the body.

You’re also carrying around more weight than normal and sweating is your body’s way of cooling itself. Bacteria found on the surface of your skin will come in contact with sweat and start feasting on the proteins, fatty acids and sulphur sweat it contains. This is ultimately what causes body odor.

How to Manage

If all this sweatiness is getting to you—and we totally get that—there are a few ways to make this transition easier. Here are a few ways to feel more comfortable:

1. Hydrate. This way, all that liquid will be released through urine and not through your sweat glands.

2. Sleep with a towel. You can keep a towel on hand or even sleep on a towel to protect your sheets.

“I did this, especially around the back of my neck! I would just get up and feel so sweaty in the middle of the night and then I’d feel like I had to change the sheet asap in the morning. The towel helped, at least it calmed me to know that the sheets weren’t all sweaty and smelly.” — Maria G.

3. Shower regularly. Cool off in the shower so that your body doesn’t need to sweat as a way to ‘cool down.’

4. Carry armpit whipes in your pumping bag. Check out this video from Nurse Zabe (7-minute, 21-second mark)

5. Apply an unscented deodorant. It’s a great way to better manage a healthy microbiome.

“For me, it was worse the first 2-6 weeks with both my children. After that I’d sweat, and be stinky, but I never felt it was more so than before having kids. I carry a spray bottle with a mixture of water and vinegar (3:1) with me, and I will spray it anywhere on my body that I think stinks. It’s also great to get the smell of spit-up, poop and pee off of clothes while you are able to wash it all.” — Maria G.

6. Shave your armpits. Remember, hair traps sweat and sweat contains proteins, fatty acids and sulphur, and this is what bacteria eats.

7. Avoid foods rich in sulphur. (i.e. red meat and spices like cumin) and cruciferous veggies (cauliflower, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, etc.)

8. Avoid alcohol. Drinking alcohol affects the nervous system as well as the circulatory system. It increases your heart rate and widens blood vessels in your skin, which can cause sweating.

9. Avoid stimulants. Coffee, for example, increases the activity of apocrine sweat glands.

The good thing to remember is that this stage is only temporary. The first couple of months might be the toughest, but after about a year postpartum, your body is pretty much back in balance and you’ll notice that includes your sweat glands.

, ,

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5 Foods to Limit or Avoid While Breastfeeding

Breast milk is incredibly nutritious. In fact, it provides most of the nutrients that your baby needs for the first 6 months of life ( 1 , 2 ). While the composition of breast milk is tightly regulated by your body, research has shown that what you eat does have some effect on the contents of breast milk ( 3 , 4 ). In general, no foods are off-limits. Instead, women are recommended to eat a balanced, varied diet. Still, there are some foods and beverages that you may want to limit while breastfeeding. Here are 5 foods to limit or avoid while breastfeeding, as well as tips for how to tell if your diet is affecting your baby. Share on Pinterest

1. Fish high in mercury Fish is a great source of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) — two types of omega-3 fatty acids that are important for brain development in infants, yet can be hard to find in other foods ( 5 ). However, some fish and seafood can also be high in mercury, a metal that can be toxic — especially in infants and kids, who are more sensitive to mercury poisoning ( 6 , 7 ). Acute exposure to high levels of mercury can permanently affect your infant’s central nervous system. As a result, they may have delays or impairments in ( 6 , 8 ): cognition

fine motor skills

speech and language development

visual-spatial awareness Therefore, fish that are high in mercury should be avoided while breastfeeding. Examples include ( 9 ): bigeye tuna

king mackerel

marlin

orange roughy

shark

swordfish

tilefish To ensure adequate omega-3 intake while reducing the risk of mercury poisoning, mothers who breastfeed are recommended to avoid high mercury fish and instead consume 8–12 ounces (225–340 grams) of low mercury fish per week ( 9 ). summary Due to concerns over mercury poisoning in infants, women who are breastfeeding should avoid fish that are high in mercury, such as shark, swordfish, and bigeye tuna.

2. Some herbal supplements The use of herbs and spices like cumin or basil to season food is considered safe during breastfeeding. However, when it comes to herbal supplements and teas, there are some concerns about safety, as there’s a lack of research in women who are breastfeeding ( 10 , 11 ). Additionally, because herbal supplements aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, there’s also the potential for these supplements to be contaminated with potentially dangerous heavy metals ( 10 , 11 ). While many women try supplements to help increase milk supply, there’s overall limited evidence on their effectiveness, with most studies finding no difference in breast milk production compared with a placebo ( 12 ). It’s best to speak with your healthcare provider before trying out a supplement. summary As most herbal supplements haven’t been evaluated for their safety during breastfeeding, it’s recommended to talk with your healthcare provider before using any supplements or herbal teas.

3. Alcohol According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), abstaining from alcohol is the safest option during breastfeeding. However, an occasional drink is likely safe, as long as you’re cautious about the amount and timing ( 13 ). How much alcohol your baby can get from breast milk depends on how much alcohol you consumed and when you consumed it. Research shows that the amount of alcohol in breast milk peaks 30–60 minutes after your last drink ( 14 ). Plus, alcohol can remain in your system for up to 2–3 hours. This is just for one drink — the more alcohol you have, the longer it can take to be cleared from your system ( 14 ). As a result, the CDC recommends limiting alcohol to just one standard drink per day and waiting at least 2 hours after that drink to breastfeed ( 13 ). One standard drink is equivalent to ( 15 ): 12 ounces (355 mL) of beer

5 ounces (125 mL) of wine

1.5 ounces (45 mL) of hard alcohol High levels of alcohol consumption have been shown to reduce breast milk output by 20%. ( 14) Moreover, frequent, excessive alcohol intake during breastfeeding has been linked to an increased risk of disrupted sleep patterns, delay in psychomotor skills, and even cognitive delay later in life ( 13 , 14 , 16 , 17 ). summary Women who are breastfeeding are recommended to limit alcohol to one drink or less per day and to wait at least 2 hours before breastfeeding. Frequent and excessive alcohol intake can reduce milk production and have serious effects on your baby.

4. Caffeine Coffee, soda, tea, and chocolate are common sources of caffeine. When you consume them, some of that caffeine can end up in your breast milk ( 18 , 19 ). This can be problematic, as babies have a hard time breaking down and getting rid of caffeine. As a result, large amounts of caffeine over time could accumulate in your baby’s system, causing irritability and trouble sleeping ( 19 , 20 ). According to the CDC, mothers who are breastfeeding are recommended to consume no more than 300 mg of caffeine per day, which is equivalent to two or three cups of coffee ( 18 ). As energy drinks often contain added vitamins and herbs, in addition to high amounts of caffeine, women who are breastfeeding are recommended to avoid these products unless otherwise approved by a trusted healthcare provider ( 21 ). summary During breastfeeding, women are recommended to limit caffeine intake to 300 mg per day or less to prevent irritability and disrupted sleep patterns in your infant.

5. Highly processed foods To meet the increased nutrient demands of breastfeeding, it’s incredibly important that you eat a healthy, balanced diet ( 22 ). As highly processed foods are generally high in calories, unhealthy fats, and added sugars, yet low in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, it’s recommended to limit their intake as much as possible. Early research has also suggested that a mother’s diet while breastfeeding may influence her child’s diet later in life ( 23 , 24 , 25 ). Specifically, animal studies have found that flavors infants are exposed to through breast milk can influence their food preferences as they grow up ( 26 ). One study observed that rats born to mothers with a high junk food diet were significantly more likely to prefer high fat, high sugar foods than those whose mothers had a balanced, healthy diet ( 27 ). While more research is needed in humans, there’s a concern that frequent exposure to fatty, sugary foods as an infant may lead to less healthy eating habits and obesity as the child ages. summary As highly processed foods are generally low in essential nutrients and may affect your child’s food preferences later in life, it’s recommended that breastfeeding moms limit their intake of foods that are high in added sugars and processed fats.

Other considerations As flavors of foods and beverages end up in your breast milk, some moms find that strongly flavored foods like onion, garlic, or spices cause their babies to refuse to feed or become fussy after eating ( 28 , 29 ). While there’s no evidence to suggest that all mothers should avoid strongly flavored foods, if you notice changes in your baby’s feedings, it’s important to talk with your dietitian or pediatrician about eliminating certain foods or spices from your diet ( 29 , 30 ). Other potential food groups that may need to be avoided during breastfeeding include cow’s milk and soy products. Approximately 0.5–2% of breastfed infants may be allergic to cow’s milk protein from their mother’s milk, while 0.25% may be allergic to soy protein ( 31 , 32 , 33 , 34 ). If your pediatrician suspects that your baby may have an allergy to milk or soy, it’s recommended to exclude all cow’s milk or soy protein from your diet for 2–4 weeks if you want to continue breastfeeding ( 35 ). summary Some babies may be more sensitive to strongly flavored foods or have an allergy to cow’s milk or soy protein. In these cases, it’s important to talk with your pediatrician before eliminating foods from your diet.

How to tell if your diet is affecting your baby Every baby is different. However, there are some common signs that your diet may be affecting your baby, including ( 36 , 37 ): eczema

bloody stools

vomiting

diarrhea

hives

constipation

wheezing

congestion

abnormal fussiness

excessive gas

anaphylaxis — while rare, it’s important to seek immediate medical attention If your baby exhibits any of these symptoms, it could be a sign that your baby is allergic or intolerant to a food in your diet. It’s important to make an appointment with your pediatrician, as they can work with you to help identify the problematic food. For some food allergies, you may be instructed to cut out any suspected allergens for 2–4 weeks to see if symptoms subside. Keep in mind that though your baby may have intolerances or allergies as an infant, they may still be able to tolerate those foods as they get older. Consult your pediatrician before adding foods back into your diet or your child’s ( 38 ). summary Symptoms like eczema, bloody stools, diarrhea, and congestion can indicate a food allergy or intolerance in your infant. It’s important to work with your pediatrician to identify which food(s) may be affecting your baby.

Should You Use Deodorant While Breastfeeding?

Who likes going around places with stinky or fishy body odour? Well, nobody likes to smell bad and for the same reason, we may choose various kinds of antiperspirants, deodorants or perfumes to suppress the body odour. You may never have raised an eyebrow before but when your baby is at stake your mind may be bubbling with all possible concerns about using such products. So, what is the reality behind this? Is it safe to use deodorants when you are breastfeeding your munchkin or is it a complete no-no? Let us find out more on this topic.

Why are Deodorants Hazardous for Breastfeeding Women?

You may not be aware but your underarm skin is one of the most delicate areas of your body and the skin of this area is comparatively thinner. The deodorants that are available in the market may have many objectionable ingredients in them, aluminium being one of the main ingredients. Whenever you apply any deodorants with these harmful chemicals it may be easily absorbed by your underarm skin and may easily reach your bloodstream too.

Nursing mothers may get it in their breast milk too, which they may unknowingly pass on to their babies too. Another aspect that calls for concern is that these deodorants come in spray bottles, which inevitably cause them to spread to other parts of the body too such as breasts, arms etc, during application and your baby may come directly in contact with it. For this very reason, it is very important for any breastfeeding mother to be extra cautious of her beauty regime and check what all ingredients her body may be unknowingly ingesting.

Why You Should Choose Safe Deodorant during Breastfeeding?

No doubt that you love to smell good all the time but certainly not at the cost of causing harm to the little one. The best thing that you can do is choose safer options and here’s why you should do that:

1. Get Rid of the Toxins

Whenever you spray deodorant on your body, you are trapping the toxins inside your body. This is because the pores of your skin and the sweat glands get blocked with the deodorant, making it difficult for the toxins to get an outlet.

2. Because Being Natural is Great

With the world going all crazy with natural and organic products why would you want to stick on to something that is nothing but all chemicals.? Let go of your chemical deodorants and switch to safer organic options.

3. Lesser Risk of Breast Cancer

The harmful chemicals present in all these chemical based deodorants may put you under the risk of having breast cancer. Protect yourself and switch to natural products.

4. Takes Toll on Your Hormones

Sometimes these chemical based deodorants also contain parabens, which are estrogenic. When these get inside our body, it fiddles with our hormones causing hormonal imbalance.

5. Lesser Risk of Alzheimer

It has been observed that constant exposure to aluminium may put you at an increased risk of Alzheimer. Therefore, save your future self from something so dreadful, by not using deodorants.

6. For a Happy Skin

You may not have realised but the harsh chemicals may harm your delicate skin, making it appear dull, lifeless and even dark. By stopping the use of deodorants, your skin may feel healthy and fresh.

7. Fewer Toxins In Your Body

You may not even know by which all means and ways various harmful toxins may be entering your body and deodorants may be one of them too. Eliminating it from your daily regime may reduce the toxins in your body.

8. For Your Baby

Not only you but your baby may be ingesting the harmful chemicals indirectly. For the sake of your little munchkin, stop using the chemical deodorants.

9. Other Harmful Chemicals

These big shot companies may not be listing all the chemicals that go into making these chemical based deodorants. The fragrance that you adore so much may have many other harmful chemicals that you may be unaware of.

You may quit smoking and make other such lifestyle changes for the well-being of your baby but you may seldom think about not using deodorants. However, sometimes you may be required to make such smaller considerations too for the sake of your baby.

Safe Deodorant Options to Consider

You must be thinking what choices you may have if you cannot use deodorants. You may be surprised to know there are many natural deodorants for breastfeeding mommies that you may choose from.

You can use activated charcoal deodorant. The charcoal may help in reducing the sticky and wet feelings that you may get after sweating and it may also help in removing body odour.

You may use deodorants or perfumes while breastfeeding that may contain various essential oils like lavender, tea tree and others. The essential oils not only help in keeping your underarm skin soft and supple but they may also be helpful in keeping body stink at bay.

You may use mineral deodorants or body antiperspirant while breastfeeding that may contain mineral salts in them. The antioxidants present in the minerals may help in battling any skin irritation and it may also hinder the growth of body odour causing bacteria.

Be a smart mommy and know about everything that you are using while breastfeeding. Being aware really helps in saving yourself from many unforeseen dangers. Using chemical based deodorants may be something that may lead to many probable harmful effects for you and your baby. Make smart choices and shift to natural or organic products and be in sync with the changing world.

Also Read: Is It Safe to Get Tattoo while Breastfeeding?

Breastfeeding & antiperspirant – considerations for new mothers

Your armpit is the focal point of some pretty intimate conversations.

Sweating, body odour, body hair… the armpit, and what you do with it, has everyone weighing in.

And no conversation is more loaded than the one about the connection between what you put on your pit and what ends up in your baby’s body.

Like so much else to do with deodorant, the public discourse about antiperspirants and deodorants containing aluminium and breastfeeding is raging, and full of contradictory information, advice, and opinions.

We are not doctors. We have not studied child-rearing, breastfeeding, or anything pediatric in an in-depth, professional capacity. But we are a science-based company dedicated to promoting self care and awareness.

So here’s our take on using anti-perspirant when you’re breastfeeding.

What we know about antiperspirant

If you haven’t been following along on our blog, here’s a little re-cap: most commercial antiperspirants use an aluminium chloride compound, which mixes with your sweat and plugs up your sweat glands. This is troublesome for two reasons: one, sweating is natural function of the body to flush our systems of toxin.

Two, when you use aluminium to plug up your pores, they inevitably let a lot of aluminium into your body.

What we know about aluminium

Aluminium is a heavy metal capable of crossing the “blood-brain barrier” – a filtering mechanism of the capillaries that blocks the passage of certain substances into the brain.

This is to say that aluminium can accumulate in your body much more easily than other toxins. When it does, it can cause hormone disruption, potentially cancer, and, some studies suggest, even alzheimer’s disease.

Generally speaking, heavy daily use of an antiperspirant containing aluminium will increase the amount of aluminium in your body, but occasional use isn’t likely to give most adults cancer or other health issues.

But babies work a little differently.

What we know about breast milk & babies

As you may have noticed, babies are quite a bit smaller than adults.

While this makes them universally adorable, it also means that much smaller amounts of chemicals and heavy metals are required for them to experience toxicity in their systems.

Add that to the fact that the high fat and protein content of breastmilk attracts heavy metals and other contaminants, and there’s a good reason to be concerned about introducing excess aluminium into your system while breastfeeding your newborn.

So – antiperspirant while breastfeeding?

Is aluminium potentially bad for you and your newborn child? Absolutely.

Do you need to launch yourself into a frenzied detox, eschew all conventional beauty products, and stress out for the next 9-24 months while breastfeeding? Probably not.

The truth is that we accumulate less aluminium into breast milk through – and here’s the key word – occasional antiperspirant use than we do through the foods that we eat. And if where you apply you aluminium compound has you worried (the armpit is, after all, right next to the breast in question), you can rest a little easier knowing there are natural barriers in place between the underarm and the milk ducts.

We are advocates of free-from products, especially for mothers growing and feeding young children. But we are also advocates for mothers lowering their stress levels and feeling less judgement from the media and their peers.

Every body is different, and each of us will absorb and process aluminium in different ways. If you know you have a sensitivity, it might be best to switch to a free-from deodorant for the foreseeable child-rearing future.

But if you’re heading into public for the first time in three months and it’s 39 degrees outside, and you’re already self-conscious due to exhaustion and baby brain, it’s probably okay to slap on a layer of antiperspirant and call it a day (maybe just try out a little detox deodorant at night, between feedings).

The bottom line is that switching to a free-from deodorant from an antiperspirant will lower the amount of aluminium in your breast milk, which will lower the amount of aluminium that ends up in your baby. Regardless of any debate, that’s probably not a bad thing – for your child, or yourself.

Products Recommended

Why We Should Choose Safe Deodorant while Breastfeeding

Something that you might not be thinking about when breastfeeding is . . . your deodorant. Why should we be rethinking our purchases when it comes to deodorants and antiperspirants? Let me tell you. It’s all about the ingredients–especially while breastfeeding.

But first, do you know the difference between deodorant and antiperspirant? We know that they both fight body odor, but what is really the difference?

An antiperspirant builds a barrier that keeps you from sweating. It’s often made with water solvent ingredients like aluminum.

builds a barrier that keeps you from sweating. It’s often made with water solvent ingredients like aluminum. A deodorant still allows you to sweat, but it is made to kill, cut down or mask the odor when you do sweat. Deodorants are often made with antibacterial ingredients like Triclosan and fragrances.

If you begin to look at large deodorants and antiperspirants companies’ ingredients and research those questionable ingredients, you will be shocked! I know I was. For example, did you know that there are growing concerns that aluminum may lead to various cancers, Alzheimer’s and a bunch of other diseases? Scary! Triclosan, Paraben and propylene-glycol are also used in mass-produced deodorants, and have all been linked to many different health issues.

So why are we putting these things on our bodies while we are pregnant and breastfeeding? I think it’s because we trust that these large corporations would never put harmful chemicals in their products. Sigh . . . Unfortunately, this is not the case. But, fortunately, there are cleaner and safer options on the market. I’ve made the switch and have chosen Earth Mama’s organic deodorant.

If you didn’t or still don’t think switching to a safer deodorant is important, I’m sharing 10 reasons why you should make the switch. Especially if you’re breastfeeding.

1. Because Earth Mama deodorants are better than natural — they’re organic!

Earth Mama deodorants have been tested and are certified NSF/ANSI 305 by Oregon Tilth. Their ingredients are safe and simple so you know you’re getting the best! Just remember, fewer ingredients means safer for you to use.

2. So you can sweat it out! And remove the stink.

Our bodies need to sweat. It’s how we are able to regulate our own temperature. Not only that, sweating is one of the ways our bodies get rid of toxins. If we’re blocking our pores with these chemical filled products, we’re not letting our skin breathe. A big no-no.

However, just because we need our bodies to sweat it doesn’t mean that we have to continue to stink. Rather than covering up the smell with a fragrance, Earth Mama’s deodorants include baking soda, which prevents odor-causing bacteria from forming in the first place. 🙂

3. Avoid “fragrances.”

Speaking of fragrances, you may have heard that “fragrances” on labels can actually be a bad thing. And that’s putting it lightly. Did you know that when listing “fragrances” on ingredients labels companies are actually not required to list exactly what is in their products? That means there could be tons of different things in there that could be harmful to us. Scary! Luckily in Earth Mama’s deodorants you know that you are getting natural and certified organic ingredients, including their scents. #NoFWord

4. Keep your hormones in check.

As breastfeeding mamas, our hormones are already all over the place. (At least mine are!) But did you know that regular chemical deodorants have parabens in them? And parabens are estrogenic. What happens is our bodies absorb the estrogen through our skin and this can cause hormonal imbalance. No thank you! Organic deodorants like Earth Mama are paraben-free so it’s now one less thing I have to worry about.

5. Decrease your risk of breast cancer.

As I mentioned, our skin absorbs everything we put on it. When you use antiperspirants–which can contain cancer-causing chemicals–they are locked into our bodies since we are not able to sweat it out. And even more of those chemicals can be absorbed if we have any small abrasions in the skin. With the armpits being so close to our lymph nodes and breasts, toxins can easily build up there, leading to cells mutating into cancer. #LoveYourLymphNodes

6. Decrease your risk of Alzheimer’s.

It is believed that there may be a correlation between Alzheimer’s Disease and high exposure to aluminum. With Alzheimer’s becoming more and more prevalent and people being affected at a younger age, we need to do all that we can to reduce our chances of becoming affected. Alzheimer’s is something that runs in my family, so for me this hits close to home.

7. When breastfeeding, reduce the chemicals you’re passing to your baby.

When I’m breastfeeding my son is wiggling around and putting his hands everywhere, including my armpits. The last thing I want him to be exposed to or put in his mouth are harmful chemicals. Not only that, but when you’re breastfeeding, what goes into your body (the products you are using) goes into your child’s body. That means whatever toxins you’re taking in you are passed on to your baby. I’m all about doing my part to provide a healthier start for my son.

8. Reduce your exposure to toxic chemicals during pregnancy.

When you’re pregnant you wouldn’t think to drink alcohol, smoke or do drugs. Obviously those things are unhealthy and unsafe for you and your growing baby. So why don’t we do the same thing when it comes to toxic products that we use? Especially with the ones that we use everyday!

FYI, these deodorants by Earth Mama weren’t just created for breastfeeding mamas, they were made for pregnant women, for people with sensitive skin, and for YOU! #WhatGoesOnGoesIn

9. Helps people who have sensitive skin.

If you have sensitive skin–like I do–you’ll know all too well how chemicals, when applied to the skin, can leave your skin with rashes, feeling dry, breaking out in hives and even develop lumps. Not fun. Deodorants and antiperspirant with chemicals can cause us to have the same intense reactions. Earth Mama products can help you avoid all of these.

10. Prevent toxins from building in your body.

Even if you don’t notice it today, tomorrow or a year from now, putting chemicals into your body on a daily basis is never a good thing. You wouldn’t take aspirin every day if you didn’t need it. Why should your deodorant be any different?

And if you want to test them out before jumping all in, Earth Mama sells their deodorants in travel sizes. 🙂 So there’s no excuse to not give it a try!

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Deodorant and Breastfeeding

WHY SWITCHING TO NATURAL IS CLEANER AND SAFER

Depending on who you ask, there are a number of things to avoid during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

There are the usual things pediatricians recommend you limit – alcohol, caffeine and even certain types of fish – but with current emphasis on using cleaner and natural formulations mothers are starting to take a look at traditional skincare and body products – especially deodorant – and switch them out for more organic and plant-based ingredients. OB/GYNs also suggest limiting products that are known to cause hormone disruption – many of which are featured in common household products and traditional skincare formulas.

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, “Timely and effective steps must be taken to ensure the safety of all mothers and infants from toxic environmental agents. Because data are lacking on the safety of most chemicals, careful consideration of the risks posed must be given while the potential immediate and long-term health and genetic risks are evaluated. A chemical should never be released if a concern exists regarding its effect on health.”

While most typically look at deodorant and antiperspirant as one and the same, there’s actually a pretty significant difference:

Formulated to prevent sweat, antiperspirant often contains ingredients such as aluminum chlorohydrate and aluminum chloride, as well as other questionable additives designed to temporarily plug sweat glands and eliminate the body’s natural need to sweat.

Deodorant, on the other hand, doesn’t eliminate sweat but it covers up the odor that inevitably develops in the underarm region after sweating.

Another reason why pregnant and nursing mothers opt to make the switch to natural deodorant is because common ingredients in traditional deodorants contain ingredients like triclosan, phthalates (synthetic fragrances) and parabens, which have been shown to contain properties that mimic estrogen and cause disruption or imbalance of hormone levels. During pregnancy or postpartum recovery when hormones are already fluctuating, using ingredients that mimic or cause an imbalance (known as being estrogenic) cause even more stress to the body during an already delicate time.

BENEFITS OF USING A NATURAL DEODORANT

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to in the near future, now’s a good time to make the switch to a natural deodorant. Embrace the idea of allowing your body to do what it does best through sweating – detoxifying and regulating body temperature – while also addressing concerns about body odor! Plant-based natural deodorants – especially those formulated with essential oils – work to eliminate body odor without disrupting the body’s natural processes.

New mothers often voice concerns with using traditional deodorants and antiperspirants while breastfeeding. Why? One concern is the location. During breastfeeding, the proximity to the underarm area increases the risk of your baby coming into contact with skin that’s been covered with questionable ingredients. Another point to consider, according to pediatricians, is that products used on your body are absorbed through the skin and filtered through the body – as well as the breastmilk – meaning what you apply to the skin will find it’s way into the baby’s milk supply.

Can You Wear Perfume When Breastfeeding? Safe Deodorant and Cosmetics for New Mothers

Many breastfeeding mothers wonder if it is safe to wear perfume while breastfeeding.

The answer to this question is a little complicated. In general, it is probably best to avoid wearing any type of fragrance while breastfeeding. This includes perfume, cologne, and scented body lotions and soaps. Some perfumes and cosmetics contain harmful chemicals that can be passed on to the baby through breast milk.

However, there are a few brands of perfume that are considered safe for breastfeeding mothers.

Is perfume safe while breastfeeding?

Perfumes contain chemicals called phthalates, which have been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer and other health problems in breastfeeding women. There is also evidence that these chemicals can be passed on to the baby through breast milk, but there’s no conclusive research yet. That’s why it’s best to avoid wearing perfume while breastfeeding, just to be safe.

Another reason to avoid scented perfume and deodorant while breastfeeding is because they may irritate your baby’s sensitive skin.

And finally, your baby might be sensitive to the smell of perfume, which could cause them to become fussy or colicky.

Do all perfumes have phthalates?

No, not all perfumes have phthalates. However, many popular brands do because phthalates are used to make fragrances last longer. Phthalates are a group of chemicals used in many products, including cosmetics and perfume, to help them smell better.

Phthalates are also known to be endocrine disruptors, which means they can interfere with the body’s hormone system. Studies have shown that exposure to phthalates can cause reproductive damage and developmental problems in children.

So if you’re concerned about the health effects of phthalates, try to choose perfume brands that don’t list them as an ingredient. Some companies are now starting to make safe phthalate-free perfume.

How do I know if my perfume has phthalates?

If you’re breastfeeding, it’s best to avoid wearing any type of fragrance. However, some brands are now starting to make safe phthalate-free perfume.

One way to find out if your perfume has phthalates is to check the ingredients list. Phthalates will usually be listed as DBP, DEHP, or BzBP. If they’re not listed on the bottle, that doesn’t mean they’re not in the perfume, it just means that the company doesn’t have to list them because they’re considered “fragrance ingredients.”

Another way to find out if your perfume has phthalates is to do a quick Google search for the name of your fragrance and “phthalates.” Chances are, you’ll find a lot of information about the health risks associated with these chemicals.

So what can you do if you want to wear a little bit of perfume?

There are a few brands of perfume and fragrances that are considered safe for breastfeeding mothers. One popular brand is called “Nursery” and it comes in both a perfume and lotion form. It is free of phthalates, parabens, and other harmful chemicals.

Another safe option is “Burt’s Bees Mama Bee Nourishing Perfume Oil”. This perfume oil is also free of harmful chemicals and it contains natural ingredients like lavender and chamomile which are known for their calming effects on babies.

There are many breastfeeding-safe deodorants on the market today and they come in a variety of scents. You can find brands like Burt’s Bees, Almay, Kiss My Face, Tom’s of Maine, and more.

Many breastfeeding-safe deodorants use natural ingredients like coconut oil and aloe vera to help fight odor-causing bacteria without harsh chemicals or artificial fragrances. Just be sure to read the label before purchasing any new products so you know they are breastfeeding friendly!

Best Breastfeeding safe perfumes and deodorants

If you really can’t live without your favorite perfume, there are a few brands that are considered safe for breastfeeding mothers. These perfumes are all made with safe ingredients that won’t harm your baby.

Here’s a few good choices if you’re looking for a safe perfume or deodorant to use while breastfeeding:

These products are all made with safe ingredients that won’t harm your baby.

Deodorant not working while breastfeeding

Many breastfeeding mothers also wonder if their regular deodorant is safe to use. Some breastfeeding mothers find that their regular deodorant isn’t working as well as it used to. This is probably because the ingredients in your old deodorant were too harsh for your now-sensitive skin.

When you are breastfeeding, your body produces a hormone called prolactin, which helps to produce breast milk. Prolactin also decreases the activity of the sweat glands, so it’s possible that your deodorant isn’t working as well as it did before because of the increase in prolactin levels.

If you’re having trouble finding a deodorant that works, try switching to an all-natural brand like Tom’s of Maine or Avalon Organics. These deodorants still contain aluminum but they also have other ingredients that help to neutralize the odor-causing bacteria in your armpits.

You can also look at using antiperspirant deodorants while breastfeeding, but something to be aware of is that many do contain an aluminium-chloride compound which isn’t good if too much accumulates in the body. So we would recommend occasional use of anti-perspirant deodorant while breastfeeding, rather than heavy use.

Is dove deodorant safe for breastfeeding?

Yes. It’s been medically documented that Dove is safe for breastfeeding mothers. Recent studies have even shown that the gentle, hypoallergenic formula of Dove doesn’t interfere with breast milk production or cause any skin irritation in nursing mothers. So if you’re looking for a reliable and safe deodorant to use while breastfeeding, Dove is a good choice.

How to reduce sweating and body odor while breastfeeding

Try using an antiperspirant instead of a deodorant

Avoid spicy or strong-smelling foods

Drink plenty of fluids

Wear loose, breathable clothing.

Keep breastfeeding mothers dry and comfortable.

Use Breastfeeding safe deodorant products

Can I put lotion on my breast if breastfeeding?

It is generally recommended that you avoid putting lotion on your breasts while breastfeeding.

Some ingredients in lotions (such as mineral oil) can pass into breast milk and can cause problems for the baby. Additionally, lotion on the breasts can make it difficult for the baby to latch on and feed properly.

If you feel like you need some moisturization, you can try using a natural product such as olive oil or coconut oil. There are a few brands with lotions and oils that are considered safe for breastfeeding mothers. These include:

AVON Anew Platinum Babyganics Fragrance Free Body Lotion The Honest Company Fragrance Free Lotion Weleda Calendula Body Oil

And for breastfeeding moms who want to wear sunscreen lotion, we can recommend:

Derma E Natural Mineral Sunblock SPF 30 Fragrance Free

EltaMD UV Physical Broad-Spectrum SPF 41

Badgerbalm Sunscreen Cream for Babies

Thinkbaby Safe Sunscreen Lotion SPF 50

California Baby Sunscreen Lotion, SPF 30+

Blue Lizard Australian Sunscreen, Kids, Fragrance-Free, SPF 30+

However, it’s best to speak with a lactation consultant if you have any concerns about how to best take care of your breastfeeding relationship.

What about the safety of other chemicals during breastfeeding?

It’s not just the perfume that you have to worry about, it’s also the other potentially toxic ingredients in your cosmetics and perfume that you should avoid when pregnant or breastfeeding. Many of them contain chemicals like parabens, phthalates, and aluminum chloride that can be harmful if they’re absorbed through your skin.

These chemicals can also make their way into your breast milk, so they’re not safe to use when breastfeeding either. That’s why breastfeeding moms need to be extra careful about what they put on their skin, especially around the breast area!

Is Perfume and deodorant safe during pregnancy?

There is no definitive answer to this question since every woman and every pregnancy is different. However, most experts agree that it’s generally safe to use perfume and other scented products during pregnancy, as long as you take a few precautions. For example, it’s best to avoid any products that contain essential oils, especially if you’re prone to skin allergies.

As for deodorant, most brands are considered safe for use while breastfeeding. However, if you’re having problems with your deodorant not working effectively, it might be a good idea to switch to an unscented variety until your baby is a bit older and isn’t nursing as often.

During pregnancy, many women experience increased sensitivity to smells. This can make perfumes and other scented products unpleasant or even intolerable for some pregnant women.

Some pregnant women find that they don’t need to wear any perfume at all during their pregnancy, while others might prefer to use a mild and unscented soap or lotion. If you do choose to use perfume, be sure to read the labels carefully to make sure there are no harmful chemicals (like phthalates) or additives in them.

Wrapping up – Can you wear perfume during breastfeeding

The breastfeeding process can be challenging for new mothers, especially if their breast milk production is high. Because the chemicals from perfume can also be harmful to breastfeeding babies, it’s best not to wear any perfume while breastfeeding.

There are a few safe deodorants and perfumes available on the market that you can use if you really can’t live without your favorite scent. Some women may also want to consider using an unscented deodorant or perfume when breastfeeding due to sensitivities with scents like lavender and chamomile which are known for their calming effects on babies.

The safest perfumes (which are made with safe ingredients) include Alba Botanica Very Emollient Unscented Deodorant, Babyganics Fragrance-Free Deodorant Stick, Amazon Brand – Solimo Aluminum Free Unscented Invisible Solid Deodorant, Burt’s Bees Mama Bee Nourishing Perfume Oil, Kiss My Face Liquid Rock Roll-On Deodorant, Fragrance-Free, Tom’s of Maine Long Lasting Unscented Deodorant.

It is also generally recommended that breastfeeding mothers avoid putting lotion on their breasts, as some ingredients in lotions (such as mineral oil) can pass into breast milk and cause problems for the baby.

But it’s always best to speak with a lactation consultant if you have any concerns about breastfeeding or breastfeeding safety.

Trusted Sources and References

[Science Direct] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0013935118305498

[Natural Resources Defense Counci] https://www.nrdc.org/stories/chemicals-avoid-when-youre-pregnant-or-breastfeeding

[What to Expect] https://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/fetal-development/fetal-smell/

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Meet Our Sponsor: Earth Mama • KellyMom.com

Do I need a Pregnancy or Breastfeeding Deodorant?

Breastfeeding can be so intimate. Snuggled close, your baby’s head nestles right in there – in the crook of your arm where she inhales you with every single breath. Scent is a vital part of mama/baby bonding, so is your baby smelling you, or an artificial scent – one that may even contain hidden ingredients? Plus your skin soaks it all in: what a pregnant or breastfeeding woman puts on her body goes in her baby. And while many pregnant women wouldn’t dream of drinking alcohol, eating sushi, or even dying their hair, they may not give a second thought to their deodorant.

Apart from the usual deodorant suspects, propylene glycol, parabens and aluminum, the ingredient called fragrance still pops up in otherwise “natural” deodorants. “Fragrance” is an ingredient that can hide thousands of undisclosed chemicals – from parabens to phthalates to artificial preservatives. The components of fragrance do not have to be listed – what’s in there is none of your business. Some chemicals in fragrance have been found in umbilical cords and breast milk, some are linked to disruptions in hormonal growth.

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It’s true, our bodies have brilliant filters (cue the lymphatic system!), but why flood them with unknown numbers of unknown chemicals?

Certified organic products that contain organic essential oils smell good naturally, they do not contain fragrance. And that’s a good way to be sure: when you are looking at labels, check for organic certification. The term natural isn’t regulated, but organic is. For instance, Earth Mama’s organic products are either certified to the NOP or the NSF/ANSI 305 organic standards by Oregon Tilth.

Earth Mama deodorants are certified to the NSF/ANSI 305 organic standard and contain organic essential oils that smell good. Earth Mama deodorants don’t contain fragrance. What’s in fragrance? None of your business. There’s no way to know which chemicals are in there. It doesn’t matter if it’s artificial, natural, or fragrance oil, the “fragrance” part is the big question.

Earth Mama’s new deodorant is better deodorant. It’s gentle and organic, and formulated especially for pregnancy, breastfeeding, and sensitive skin. And it actually works. In four flavors: Calming Lavender, Bright Citrus, GingerAid, & Natural Non-Scents, with NO propylene glycol, artificial fragrance, parabens or aluminum. Dermatologist tested and clinically tested for irritation too.

Remember to love your lymph nodes and look for the F word when buying natural deodorant. Make it your business!

#NoFword #WhatGoesOnGoesIn #LoveYourLymphNodes

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