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Can You Watch Tv During A Sleep Study | Bozeman Health Diagnostic Sleep Center – What To Expect During Your Sleep Study 210 Most Correct Answers

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Our team will go above and beyond to provide you with a comfortable space where you can relax. Sensors will be placed on the forehead, chin, and face to monitor brain waves and vital signs. These sensors are taped on and should not be painful. You can read or watch TV until you are ready to sleep.Try not to take any naps that day. Before going to the sleep center, wash your hair with shampoo only. Dry your hair and do not apply any hair sprays, oils or gels. If used, they could interfere with the sensors during the study.You can bring your cell phone, laptop, magazines or books with you. It is also important that you do not have caffeine after lunch on the day of your sleep study.

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Bozeman Health Diagnostic Sleep Center, where sleep tests take place, uses the most up-to-date equipment to test for sleep disorders and conduct overnight sleep studies to provide our physicians with information to make a correct diagnosis of the sleep problem. Our staff is highly trained, sensitive to patients whose lives are often disrupted by their sleep problems, and dedicated to providing the best solutions available that are customized to your or your child’s needs.
This video gives you a brief overview of what you can expect for your sleep study. If you have any questions or would like to schedule a sleep study, talk with your Primary Care provider or call 406-414-5058.

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What happens during a sleep study? – Piedmont Healthcare

The technologist will move to another room to monitor your sleep, Dr. Schmitt says. You may be able to watch TV or scroll through your phone before sleep, just …

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Source: www.piedmont.org

Date Published: 8/9/2021

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A Night in the Life of a Sleep Study Patient – Philips

They can read, relax or even watch television before going to sleep since many sleep centers have TVs in the room. Plus, patients are encouraged to follow …

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Date Published: 8/10/2021

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What to expect during a sleep study – Shine365

You’ll get about an hour to read, watch TV or do your normal bedtime ritual. The sleep technologist will turn off the lights around 10 p.m. so …

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Date Published: 5/29/2021

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Can you watch TV during a sleep study? – AnswersToAll

Can you watch TV during a sleep study? … They can read, relax or even watch television before going to sleep since many sleep centers have TVs …

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Date Published: 11/13/2022

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Preparing for a Sleep Study – UCLA Sleep Disorders Center

They should not be an obstacle that keeps you from falling asleep. After everything is hooked up, you will do a test to make sure it is all in working order.

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Sleep Study Preparation Information

What To Expect When You Arrive · Your sleep technician will greet you and take you to your room. · Before you study begins, you may either relax, watch TV, read, …

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SLEEP STUDIES – PATIENT INSTRUCTIONS

Smoking will not be permitted at anytime during your stay. Canceling a sleep study. If you need to cancel your scheduled sleep study, you must give the …

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What Really Happens During a Sleep Study?

Many people believe that the sleep test center is cold and harshly lit but, in fact, sleep studies are conducted in comfortable, hotel-like …

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Watching TV, listening to music before bed can actually help …

If you watch TV in bed, ‘keep it a short, focused session’ … Study lead author Dr. Morgan Ellithorpe from the University of Delaware reports …

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What can you not do during a sleep study?

Try not to take any naps that day. Before going to the sleep center, wash your hair with shampoo only. Dry your hair and do not apply any hair sprays, oils or gels. If used, they could interfere with the sensors during the study.

Can you use a phone during a sleep study?

You can bring your cell phone, laptop, magazines or books with you. It is also important that you do not have caffeine after lunch on the day of your sleep study.

Should you shower before a sleep study?

Please eat before you check in.

Refrigerators for your own food are available at all locations. The signals we record are best from clean, natural skin. To that end, it is helpful if you shower and shampoo your hair before your study. Please avoid sprays, oils, gels or make-up after you are clean (deodorant is fine).

Can you go to the bathroom during a sleep study?

“Most people sleep better than they expect. The technicians are very reassuring too.” If you have to use the bathroom during the study, just say so. The technician monitoring your sleep will disconnect the wires for you.

How many hours of sleep do you need for a sleep study?

You will usually be scheduled to spend at least six hours in bed during the sleep test. After you are woken up and out of bed, the technician will remove the recording sensors, and you will be asked to complete a brief questionnaire about how you slept during the study. You will then be free to leave the Center.

Do you have to sleep on your back during a sleep study?

“For the most accurate home sleep apnea reading, it’s best to have sleep time on your back and side,” Patil says. Sleep apnea is typically worse when sleepers are on their backs, and side sleeping can ease apnea.

What do they put in your hair during a sleep study?

During the Study

When you are dressed for sleep, the polysomnographer will apply approximately 20 electrodes to your scalp and skin. You may feel a slight tingling sensation where the skin is cleaned. Some gauze may be wrapped around your head to help hold the electrodes in place.

How do I wash my hair after sleep study?

The best thing to do is wash your hair with very warm water. We recommend using conditioner first to loosen up the paste and then washing your hair. Rubbing alcohol is also an effective, quick way to remove paste but can be rough on the scalp. Also, Micellar water can be effective and less harsh.

Can you drink water during a sleep study?

THE DAY OF YOUR SLEEP STUDY

Avoid caffeine or stimulants after noon, unless prescribed by your doctor. You may drink juices, milk and water.

Do you wear pajamas to a sleep study?

Bedclothes are necessary. Please wear something comfortable such as gym shorts, loose lounge pants and a t-shirt or pajamas. Any personal toiletries and a change of clothes for after the study. Any medications, both prescription and over the counter that you usually take prior bedtime.

Can you listen to music during a sleep study?

When you get to your room, you can change into your pajamas or any clothes you’re comfortable sleeping in. You’ll then be able to relax for a while –feel free to watch TV, quietly listen to music or read.

Do you wear a mask during a sleep study?

You will not need to wear a mask during your sleep study, but we do ask that you wear it while the technologist is preparing you for the sleep study. Patient care – your care and safety – is our top priority. As a health care provider, we always strive to provide a clean, safe environment for our patients and staff.

Overnight Sleep Study FAQ

If you are having difficulty sleeping or experience excessive fatigue during the day, your doctor will likely recommend an overnight sleep study, also known as a polysomnogram. These studies allow sleep specialists to monitor your vital signs and rapid eye movement (REM) while sleeping. After analyzing the results of the exam, they send their findings to your doctor who will use it to diagnose your sleep disorder and start a treatment plan.

Who needs an overnight sleep study?

Overnight sleep studies are often recommended for patients dealing with:

Sleep apnea and other sleep-related breathing disorders

Patients who need adjustments to their continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices

Patients who have a hard time staying awake during the day (possible cases of narcolepsy)

Patients who say they sleep through the night but still feel abnormally fatigued during the day

You might also need an overnight sleep study if you are being treated for a sleep disorder but have yet to see any results.

Will I be sleeping in an exam room?

Sleep study rooms are designed to create a home-like feel. You will stay in a dimly lit room with a comfortable bed and furnishings. There will be no other patients in the room with you, and aside from noninvasive electrodes taped to the skin to monitor vital signs, the experience is designed to feel no different than sleeping in your own home.

What happens during the study?

You will arrive at the sleep center in the evening. Our team will go above and beyond to provide you with a comfortable space where you can relax. Sensors will be placed on the forehead, chin, and face to monitor brain waves and vital signs. These sensors are taped on and should not be painful.

You can read or watch TV until you are ready to sleep. The lights will then be turned out and you will lie in bed until you fall asleep. You are alone in the room, with our sleep technicians monitoring from a nearby room via a video camera.

If you need to go to the bathroom or a sensor falls of while sleeping, the technician will need to come in and reattach it.

In the morning, the sensors will be removed and you can return home while our physicians study the results.

When will I have the results?

It usually takes about two weeks for results to be analyzed. Our board-certified sleep specialist will review the information and share the results with your physician.

What happens next?

The purpose of the sleep study is to diagnose the cause of your difficulty sleeping. With this information in hand, your doctor can create a personalized treatment plan to help you get back on a regular schedule.

You may be asked to return for a Maintenance of Wakefulness Test once you’ve started treatment to ensure that the desired results are achieved.

Preparing for a Sleep Study

You may have many questions as you prepare for a sleep study at a sleep center or lab. Knowing what to expect will help you feel more relaxed before and during the study. In fact, many people find that taking a sleep study is a fascinating experience. Up until now, your sleep has probably been a mystery to you. You may not be sure why you aren’t sleeping as well as you would like. The sleep study will help reveal some of the secrets and dispel some of the mystery of your sleep. It will show in very precise details exactly what happens while you are sleeping. This data will help detect the cause of your sleep problem. Then your sleep specialist will have a good idea of how to help you sleep better. Improving your sleep will help you feel better, think more clearly, and have more energy. It will be a great benefit to your overall health and quality of life.

Why Do I Need A Sleep Study?

Taking a sleep study in an accredited sleep center or lab is the best way to find out if you have a sleep disorder. It is the “gold standard” of sleep disorders diagnosis. Sleep is not a simple process. Many parts of the brain control your sleep in various stages. These stages of sleep include drowsiness, light sleep, deep sleep, and dream sleep. An overnight sleep study is the best way to analyze your sleep in all of its complexity. This kind of study is called a polysomnogram. It measures your brain waves, heart beat, and breathing. It also records movements of your eyes and legs. It shows your doctor the “big picture” of your sleep pattern. At the same time, it provides precise facts on what your body is doing at every moment of sleep. It combines a panoramic view with microscopic details. It is the most complete and scientific way to evaluate your sleep and discover any problems.

Preparing For A Sleep Study

Do not have any caffeine in the afternoon or evening before an overnight sleep study. This includes coffee, tea, cola, and chocolate. Also avoid drinking any alcohol. You do not want any substance to affect your sleep. Try not to take any naps that day. Before going to the sleep center, wash your hair with shampoo only. Dry your hair and do not apply any hair sprays, oils or gels. If used, they could interfere with the sensors during the study.

Pack an overnight bag to take with you to the center. Bring comfortable pajamas and a change of clothes for the morning. Include the same items you would take for a stay at a hotel. You may also want to bring your own pillow. Bring your medications if you will need to take them while you are away from home. If you have special needs or concerns, tell the sleep center staff ahead of time. They will do all they can to help you feel relaxed and at ease.

Should I take my medication as usual?

It is vital that your sleep specialist is aware of any medications that you are taking. This includes both prescription and non-prescription drugs. He or she should even know if you are taking common cold medicines or pain relievers. Certain drugs can affect your sleep and the results of the study. You may need to gradually stop taking some medications in the days leading up to a sleep study. Your doctor will let you know if this is something you need to do. Do not stop taking any prescription medication without first talking to your sleep specialist.

What Will Happen When I Arrive At The Sleep Center?

You will be told to arrive at the sleep center at a certain time in the evening. This is usually between 5:30 pm and 9:30 pm. One of the staff will greet you and lead you to your bedroom. A technologist will show you the equipment that will be used for the study. his will be a good time for you to ask any questions about how the study works. You should inform him or her of any recent changes in your sleep. Also tell him or her of any specific problems that you did not already discuss with your doctor. There will most likely be a few papers that you need to fill out at this point.

You will be given time to change into nightclothes and to make yourself at home in the bedroom. You should get ready for bed in the same way you do at home. There may be a waiting period where you have some extra time to relax. You can read or watch TV. When the technologist returns, be sure to confirm your wake-up time in the morning. Inform him or her if you have an early-morning commitment that you need to keep.

Next, about two dozen sensors are applied to the skin of your head and body with a mild adhesive. These small metal discs are called electrodes. They are connected to a computer and record the vital signs of your sleep. The wires are long enough to let you move around and turn over in bed. Flexible elastic belts around your chest and abdomen measure your breathing. A clip on your finger or earlobe monitors your heart rate and the level of oxygen in your blood. None of these devices are painful. They are all designed to be as comfortable as possible. The sensors may feel strange on your skin at first. But most people get used to them very quickly. They should not be an obstacle that keeps you from falling asleep. After everything is hooked up, you will do a test to make sure it is all in working order. You will be asked to move your eyes, clench your teeth and move your legs. Once it is all ready, you are free to read or watch TV until your normal bedtime. Then the lights are turned out and it is time for you to go to sleep.

You may have questions or concerns about having the sensors placed on you. Perhaps you use a hearing aid, wear a hairpiece, or have sensitive skin. Be sure to discuss these and any other concerns with your doctor before you arrive at the sleep center.

How will I be able to sleep in a strange environment with all those wires on me?

This is the question that people ask most often before a sleep study. Many people expect the sleep center to be cold and harshly lit. They imagine that their room will be like a small closet, filled with computers and beeping machines. But most sleep centers make you feel relaxed and comfortable. Their rooms are nicely decorated and may remind you of a hotel. It is so quiet and peaceful that most patients fall asleep quickly. It is expected that you might not sleep quite as well as you do at home. This should not hinder the study or affect the results.

What Happens During The Sleep Study?

The technologist will stay awake all night to monitor your sleep. He or she will be in a nearby room with the computers and equipment. You will be able to roll over and change sleeping positions as often as you like. The sensor wires are gathered together behind your head to give you the freedom to move in bed. During the night the technologist may ask you to spend some time sleeping on your back. This will provide better data on your breathing patterns. A low-light video camera may also record your sleep for later review. This will allow your doctor to see any unusual movements or behavior that may occur during you sleep.

While you are sleeping, important brain and body functions are measured and recorded. This may reveal that you have a breathing problem during sleep. A common example of this kind of problem is obstructive sleep apnea. In this case, the technologist may awaken you. He or she will fit you with a mask. It will either cover your nose or your nose and mouth. Another version has soft silicone tubes that fit directly in your nostrils. These are called nasal pillows. The mask provides you with a steady stream of air that gently blows into the back of your throat. This treatment is called positive airway pressure (PAP). While there are three kinds of PAP, the most common uses a level of pressure that remains continuous (CPAP).

You will try sleeping for the rest of the night with the mask. The technician will find the right level of air pressure to help you breathe normally as you sleep. This process is called a CPAP study. Usually your doctor will know in advance if there is a chance that this may occur. He or she will discuss this with you ahead of time. The use and purpose of the device will be explained to you in detail. You may even get to try on a mask and test it before your sleep study begins.

What if I need to go to the bathroom while I’m hooked up to all those wires?

This is actually a common and easy task. All you need to do is say out loud that you have to go to the bathroom. The technologist who is monitoring your sleep will hear you. He or she will come in to unplug your wires. All of the wires that are attached to you go into a central control box. The technologist will simply unplug the wires from the box and you will be free to get up. The sensors themselves do not need to be removed from your body. This makes it very easy to hook your wires back up when you return to bed. Most people have to get up at least once during the sleep study.

What Happens During A Nap Study?

Sometimes you may need to stay after your sleep study to take a daytime nap study. This study is called a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). It is used to see how quickly you fall asleep in quiet situations during the day. The MSLT is the standard tool used to evaluate people who are thought to have narcolepsy. It may also be used to see if a person has hypersomnia. It begins between 1.5 and three hours after you wake up from the overnight sleep study. It consists of five nap opportunities with breaks lasting for two hours in between them. A shorter four-nap study may also be used. Your sleep patterns are monitored with most of the same recording equipment used the night before. The time it takes you to fall asleep will be measured. The kind of sleep you get during each nap will also be recorded. This is a valuable tool to help determine why someone is very sleepy during the day.

Be sure to plan ahead for a longer stay when you are scheduled for a nap study. You can call the center in advance to find out about breakfast and lunch plans. They can also let you know about what time the MSLT will be finished. Between nap trials, you will have to stay out of bed and occupy yourself so that you remain awake. You may want to bring things with you to work on or to entertain yourself. You can also ask about watching TV or videos between naps.

What Happens After My Sleep Study?

The analysis of a sleep study is a complex and time-consuming process. A typical sleep study produces about 1,000 pages of data. This information includes things such as brain waves, eye movements, and breathing patterns. It requires hours of work from a trained professional to accurately analyze the results. A sleep technologist processes or “scores” all of this data. A sleep study is not something that you pass or fail. The scored results are simply given to a doctor for further evaluation. At an accredited center, this doctor must be a board-certified sleep specialist. The doctor will review the study to find out what kind of sleep problem you may have. Because of the detail and amount of time involved, it usually takes about two weeks for you to get the results. The doctor who ordered the study will discuss the results with you. If your primary care doctor ordered it, then the results are sent to him or her. If you met with a doctor in the sleep center, then he or she will tell you the results.

Summary

Your sleep does not have to be a mystery. A sleep study is a reliable, scientific, and painless way to find out why you don’t sleep as well as you would like. It gives you valuable insight into the process of how you sleep. But it doesn’t just give you understanding. It can also provide you with answers. With the results, a sleep specialist will be able to develop a plan of treatment to help you finally get the kind of sleep you want and need.

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What Happens in a Sleep Study?

A lot goes on in your brain and in your body while you’re asleep. Tracking this activity during a sleep study can help your doctor diagnose and treat a variety of sleep disorders, including sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome, and can serve as an evaluation for certain causes of excessive sleepiness, says Johns Hopkins sleep expert Sara Benjamin, M.D.

If you have questions about undergoing a sleep study, you’re not alone. Here are some answers that can help you understand the process and put you at ease.

What Does a Sleep Study Measure?

The most widely used type of sleep study is a polysomnogram. While you slumber in a high-tech sleep lab that looks like a comfortable hotel room, a technician in a nearby room records your brain activity and selected information from your body. Together, this data reveal a detailed picture of your unique sleep patterns—including how much time you spend in light and deep stages, whether you’re receiving enough oxygen, how often you awaken (even slightly), and whether sleep is disrupted by factors such as arm and leg movements.

What Sleep-Lab Equipment Is Used?

After you arrive at the sleep center (usually in the evening), a technician will apply small sensors to your head and body with adhesive. The wires connecting the sensors to a computer are usually gathered over your head with plenty of slack so you can move around during sleep. Elastic belts also may be wrapped around your chest and abdomen to measure breathing. And a clip may be placed on your finger or earlobe to monitor oxygen levels in your bloodstream. Most people get used to it all very quickly.

If the sleep technician suspects that you have obstructive sleep apnea, you may wear a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine during the second half of the night in the sleep lab. You may be asked to try on the breathing mask before you go to sleep, to be sure it fits. “The technician will adjust the machine and monitor to see if it improves your sleep,” Benjamin says.

What Steps Can Increase Comfort?

For better sleep, avoid alcohol and naps the day of your sleep study. Don’t have anything with caffeine (including coffee, tea, cola and chocolate) after lunch. At your doctor’s visit before your sleep study, be sure to share all of the medications and supplements you take. Follow your doctor’s recommendations, and bring comfortable pajamas and a book or magazine to read.

“We don’t expect you to sleep as well as you would at home, and we take that into account,” Benjamin says. “Most people sleep better than they expect. The technicians are very reassuring too.” If you have to use the bathroom during the study, just say so. The technician monitoring your sleep will disconnect the wires for you.

What Happens After a Polysomnogram?

A sleep study produces hundreds of pages of information about your night in the sleep lab. It will give your doctor the big picture about your sleep, plus lots of important details. “It usually takes about two weeks for the sleep specialist to review it and send the results to your doctor,” Benjamin says. “The results will help your doctor decide on the best treatment so you get a good night’s sleep.”

Here Is What Happens During A Sleep Study

What happens during a sleep study?

If you often snore or battle daytime tiredness, your doctor may schedule you for a sleep study. But that can sound scary, and you’re probably wondering what the study will actually be like.

The good news is, sleep studies are easier and more comfortable than ever before. You may even be able to do yours at home, in the comfort of your own bed.

“I think a lot of people come in with the idea that the in-lab sleep study will be us sticking them in something like a medieval dungeon,” says Matthew Schmitt, M.D., a Piedmont pulmonary and sleep medicine physician. In reality, many sleep center bedrooms resemble hotel rooms.

Even if you have trouble falling or staying asleep, technologists can usually gather enough data for a reliable diagnosis. One night of tracking – either at a sleep center or at home – is typically all that’s required.

Do you have a sleep disorder?

Many signs of poor sleep are easy to spot. If you’re snoring loudly, waking up with a gasp or feeling tired every day, you may have sleep apnea. People with this disorder repeatedly stop and start breathing during the night, Dr. Schmitt says. During obstructive sleep apnea, your throat muscles intermittently relax and block your airway during sleep.

Other symptoms can be more insidious. For example, patients complaining of memory problems may suffer from a sleep disorder, and mental health is linked with sleep as well.

“Several studies have shown an association between depression and sleep apnea,” Dr. Schmitt says, “and appropriate therapy may help reduce the symptoms of depression in adults with sleep apnea.”

Diagnosing apneas and other issues, including restless leg syndrome and REM sleep behavioral disorder, usually requires polysomnography. This is what most people think of when they envision a sleep study: overnight tracking to record brain activity, eye movement and other metrics.

Some sleep disorders, such as narcolepsy, are diagnosed with both nighttime and daytime studies.

What happens at the sleep center?

If you’re scheduled for polysomnography, you’ll arrive in the evening with your own pajamas and toiletries. The goal of the study is to capture the way you actually sleep, so doctors aim to replicate those conditions.

Once you’ve checked in with a technologist, they will show you to your room and connect you to various monitors. These may include:

EKG monitors

Elastic belts to measure breathing

Microphone to amplify snoring

Oxygen monitor

Wire electrodes to track brain activity

Wire electrodes to track movement

The technologist will move to another room to monitor your sleep, Dr. Schmitt says. You may be able to watch TV or scroll through your phone before sleep, just as you would at home.

“We like to see your normal routine,” Dr. Schmitt says.

Once you’re asleep, the technologist will monitor you throughout the night. You don’t need to get a full eight hours of sleep; generally two to three hours of sleep or more will provide enough data, Dr. Schmitt says.

The next morning, you’ll be able to shower, get dressed and go home or to work. The technologist will compile a report for your doctor, which they’ll use to create a treatment plan.

At-home studies

Many people worry about feeling claustrophobic at a sleep center. If your doctor approves an at-home study, you can stay in your own bed with minimal wiring attached.

“The at-home technology has certainly advanced,” Dr. Schmitt says.

Your doctor will give you a tracking device that you’ll set up yourself, he says. Staff members at the clinic can demonstrate how to configure it. Once your study is over, you can mail the device back, and the doctor will review the results with you later.

Even if you’re nervous about sleep studies, don’t rely on your own smartphone or fitness watch for data. Although these devices can be helpful for recognizing the signs of a problem, Dr. Schmitt says, they tend to overestimate how much and how deeply you’re sleeping. Only a doctor can properly diagnose you.

Getting better sleep every night

If you have sleep apnea, you may be prescribed a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. Like sleep studies themselves, Dr. Schmitt says, CPAP machines are less imposing than they may seem. To use it, you wear a mask connected to the machine, which keeps your airway open as you sleep.

“There are many, many new masks out on the market,” Dr. Schmitt says. “The materials have gotten softer and more comfortable.”

Even if you don’t have a disorder, good sleep hygiene is beneficial for everyone. Dr. Schmitt offers these tips for getting better rest:

Avoid your phone and TV in the evening. Certain wavelengths of light from these devices may suppress melatonin, which can make good sleep difficult to come by.

If you experience anxiety around bedtime, jot down tasks or worries in a journal to get them off your brain.

Meditate or practice deep-breathing exercises.

Stop drinking caffeine and alcohol at least 4 to 6 hours before bedtime.

Keep your bedroom cool and dark.

Your sleep may not magically improve overnight, but better habits put you on the road toward better rest.

“Good sleep doesn’t happen by chance,” Dr. Schmitt says. “You have to put effort into it.”

Need to book an appointment with a Piedmont physician? Save time, book online.

A Night in the Life of a Sleep Study Patient

A Night in the Life of a Sleep Study Patient

You arrive by 7 p.m. ready to tuck in for the night. No, it’s not a luxury hotel suite with room service, but it’s also not a sterile room where you’re hooked up to numerous gadgets and leered at while a team of medical experts poke and prod you and listen to you snore. If that’s what you envisioned when you think about having a sleep study, we’re here to ease your mind. While granted, it might not be the best night’s sleep you’ve ever gotten, having a sleep study is a crucial way to help diagnose sleep disorders like sleep apnea, which can not only help save your life but can put you on the path to a good night sleep every night. “There are very few outpatient medical tests that require a patient to be connected to wires, wear pajamas, and sleep in a medical facility. While a sleep study is different than other medical tests, it does not have to be intimidating,” says Dr. Neil Kline, D.O., internist and sleep physician and representative of the American Sleep Association. Patients don’t realize that sleeping in a sleep center is very much like sleeping in a hotel—well minus some of the luxuries. However, sleep study rooms are designed to look like hotel rooms. The biggest difference though is that you’ll have wires attached to your body. Kline says the sleep study process is simple and painless. Here’s what happens: Patients check in after dinner and bring along comfortable sleep wear plus any favorite bed gear like a pillow or blanket they prefer. Patients are then hooked up to about 20 wires, attached before bedtime and connected with adhesive paste, clips, and tape. “Once the patient is in bed, ready for sleep, the wires usually do not interfere with sleep,” says Kline. They can read, relax or even watch television before going to sleep since many sleep centers have TVs in the room. Plus, patients are encouraged to follow their pre-bedtime sleep ritual then drift off as they would at home. In the sleep center, a sleep technologist monitors the patient from another room. The technologist’s job is to collect the data and ensure the patient’s safety. Most centers use infrared cameras as well as microphones to communicate with the patient if necessary. The technologist records several biologic signals that help to evaluate sleep patterns. These signals include EEG (brainwaves), EOG (eye movements), EMG (muscle movements), EKG (heart rhythm), breathing movements, and oxygen levels. After the data is collected and processed, it is sent to a sleep physician for interpretation. The sleep physician can then rule in or out any sleep disorders that may need treatment. “Sleep studies are generally sufficient to diagnose or exclude sleep apnea,” says Kline. Though occasionally, a repeat sleep study is required if there is inadequate data. And yes, patients actually sleep a significant amount of hours during their study. “It is rare for someone to not sleep at all,” Kline says. In the morning, the patient is disconnected from the electrodes and can leave the sleep center. It’s valuable to realize that going through a sleep study is a painless experience. While there is some inconvenience with having wires attached to the body, the overall experience is not that different from sleeping in a hotel—minus the room service.

Preparing for a Sleep Study

You may have many questions as you prepare for a sleep study at a sleep center or lab. Knowing what to expect will help you feel more relaxed before and during the study. In fact, many people find that taking a sleep study is a fascinating experience. Up until now, your sleep has probably been a mystery to you. You may not be sure why you aren’t sleeping as well as you would like. The sleep study will help reveal some of the secrets and dispel some of the mystery of your sleep. It will show in very precise details exactly what happens while you are sleeping. This data will help detect the cause of your sleep problem. Then your sleep specialist will have a good idea of how to help you sleep better. Improving your sleep will help you feel better, think more clearly, and have more energy. It will be a great benefit to your overall health and quality of life.

Why Do I Need A Sleep Study?

Taking a sleep study in an accredited sleep center or lab is the best way to find out if you have a sleep disorder. It is the “gold standard” of sleep disorders diagnosis. Sleep is not a simple process. Many parts of the brain control your sleep in various stages. These stages of sleep include drowsiness, light sleep, deep sleep, and dream sleep. An overnight sleep study is the best way to analyze your sleep in all of its complexity. This kind of study is called a polysomnogram. It measures your brain waves, heart beat, and breathing. It also records movements of your eyes and legs. It shows your doctor the “big picture” of your sleep pattern. At the same time, it provides precise facts on what your body is doing at every moment of sleep. It combines a panoramic view with microscopic details. It is the most complete and scientific way to evaluate your sleep and discover any problems.

Preparing For A Sleep Study

Do not have any caffeine in the afternoon or evening before an overnight sleep study. This includes coffee, tea, cola, and chocolate. Also avoid drinking any alcohol. You do not want any substance to affect your sleep. Try not to take any naps that day. Before going to the sleep center, wash your hair with shampoo only. Dry your hair and do not apply any hair sprays, oils or gels. If used, they could interfere with the sensors during the study.

Pack an overnight bag to take with you to the center. Bring comfortable pajamas and a change of clothes for the morning. Include the same items you would take for a stay at a hotel. You may also want to bring your own pillow. Bring your medications if you will need to take them while you are away from home. If you have special needs or concerns, tell the sleep center staff ahead of time. They will do all they can to help you feel relaxed and at ease.

Should I take my medication as usual?

It is vital that your sleep specialist is aware of any medications that you are taking. This includes both prescription and non-prescription drugs. He or she should even know if you are taking common cold medicines or pain relievers. Certain drugs can affect your sleep and the results of the study. You may need to gradually stop taking some medications in the days leading up to a sleep study. Your doctor will let you know if this is something you need to do. Do not stop taking any prescription medication without first talking to your sleep specialist.

What Will Happen When I Arrive At The Sleep Center?

You will be told to arrive at the sleep center at a certain time in the evening. This is usually between 5:30 pm and 9:30 pm. One of the staff will greet you and lead you to your bedroom. A technologist will show you the equipment that will be used for the study. his will be a good time for you to ask any questions about how the study works. You should inform him or her of any recent changes in your sleep. Also tell him or her of any specific problems that you did not already discuss with your doctor. There will most likely be a few papers that you need to fill out at this point.

You will be given time to change into nightclothes and to make yourself at home in the bedroom. You should get ready for bed in the same way you do at home. There may be a waiting period where you have some extra time to relax. You can read or watch TV. When the technologist returns, be sure to confirm your wake-up time in the morning. Inform him or her if you have an early-morning commitment that you need to keep.

Next, about two dozen sensors are applied to the skin of your head and body with a mild adhesive. These small metal discs are called electrodes. They are connected to a computer and record the vital signs of your sleep. The wires are long enough to let you move around and turn over in bed. Flexible elastic belts around your chest and abdomen measure your breathing. A clip on your finger or earlobe monitors your heart rate and the level of oxygen in your blood. None of these devices are painful. They are all designed to be as comfortable as possible. The sensors may feel strange on your skin at first. But most people get used to them very quickly. They should not be an obstacle that keeps you from falling asleep. After everything is hooked up, you will do a test to make sure it is all in working order. You will be asked to move your eyes, clench your teeth and move your legs. Once it is all ready, you are free to read or watch TV until your normal bedtime. Then the lights are turned out and it is time for you to go to sleep.

You may have questions or concerns about having the sensors placed on you. Perhaps you use a hearing aid, wear a hairpiece, or have sensitive skin. Be sure to discuss these and any other concerns with your doctor before you arrive at the sleep center.

How will I be able to sleep in a strange environment with all those wires on me?

This is the question that people ask most often before a sleep study. Many people expect the sleep center to be cold and harshly lit. They imagine that their room will be like a small closet, filled with computers and beeping machines. But most sleep centers make you feel relaxed and comfortable. Their rooms are nicely decorated and may remind you of a hotel. It is so quiet and peaceful that most patients fall asleep quickly. It is expected that you might not sleep quite as well as you do at home. This should not hinder the study or affect the results.

What Happens During The Sleep Study?

The technologist will stay awake all night to monitor your sleep. He or she will be in a nearby room with the computers and equipment. You will be able to roll over and change sleeping positions as often as you like. The sensor wires are gathered together behind your head to give you the freedom to move in bed. During the night the technologist may ask you to spend some time sleeping on your back. This will provide better data on your breathing patterns. A low-light video camera may also record your sleep for later review. This will allow your doctor to see any unusual movements or behavior that may occur during you sleep.

While you are sleeping, important brain and body functions are measured and recorded. This may reveal that you have a breathing problem during sleep. A common example of this kind of problem is obstructive sleep apnea. In this case, the technologist may awaken you. He or she will fit you with a mask. It will either cover your nose or your nose and mouth. Another version has soft silicone tubes that fit directly in your nostrils. These are called nasal pillows. The mask provides you with a steady stream of air that gently blows into the back of your throat. This treatment is called positive airway pressure (PAP). While there are three kinds of PAP, the most common uses a level of pressure that remains continuous (CPAP).

You will try sleeping for the rest of the night with the mask. The technician will find the right level of air pressure to help you breathe normally as you sleep. This process is called a CPAP study. Usually your doctor will know in advance if there is a chance that this may occur. He or she will discuss this with you ahead of time. The use and purpose of the device will be explained to you in detail. You may even get to try on a mask and test it before your sleep study begins.

What if I need to go to the bathroom while I’m hooked up to all those wires?

This is actually a common and easy task. All you need to do is say out loud that you have to go to the bathroom. The technologist who is monitoring your sleep will hear you. He or she will come in to unplug your wires. All of the wires that are attached to you go into a central control box. The technologist will simply unplug the wires from the box and you will be free to get up. The sensors themselves do not need to be removed from your body. This makes it very easy to hook your wires back up when you return to bed. Most people have to get up at least once during the sleep study.

What Happens During A Nap Study?

Sometimes you may need to stay after your sleep study to take a daytime nap study. This study is called a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). It is used to see how quickly you fall asleep in quiet situations during the day. The MSLT is the standard tool used to evaluate people who are thought to have narcolepsy. It may also be used to see if a person has hypersomnia. It begins between 1.5 and three hours after you wake up from the overnight sleep study. It consists of five nap opportunities with breaks lasting for two hours in between them. A shorter four-nap study may also be used. Your sleep patterns are monitored with most of the same recording equipment used the night before. The time it takes you to fall asleep will be measured. The kind of sleep you get during each nap will also be recorded. This is a valuable tool to help determine why someone is very sleepy during the day.

Be sure to plan ahead for a longer stay when you are scheduled for a nap study. You can call the center in advance to find out about breakfast and lunch plans. They can also let you know about what time the MSLT will be finished. Between nap trials, you will have to stay out of bed and occupy yourself so that you remain awake. You may want to bring things with you to work on or to entertain yourself. You can also ask about watching TV or videos between naps.

What Happens After My Sleep Study?

The analysis of a sleep study is a complex and time-consuming process. A typical sleep study produces about 1,000 pages of data. This information includes things such as brain waves, eye movements, and breathing patterns. It requires hours of work from a trained professional to accurately analyze the results. A sleep technologist processes or “scores” all of this data. A sleep study is not something that you pass or fail. The scored results are simply given to a doctor for further evaluation. At an accredited center, this doctor must be a board-certified sleep specialist. The doctor will review the study to find out what kind of sleep problem you may have. Because of the detail and amount of time involved, it usually takes about two weeks for you to get the results. The doctor who ordered the study will discuss the results with you. If your primary care doctor ordered it, then the results are sent to him or her. If you met with a doctor in the sleep center, then he or she will tell you the results.

Summary

Your sleep does not have to be a mystery. A sleep study is a reliable, scientific, and painless way to find out why you don’t sleep as well as you would like. It gives you valuable insight into the process of how you sleep. But it doesn’t just give you understanding. It can also provide you with answers. With the results, a sleep specialist will be able to develop a plan of treatment to help you finally get the kind of sleep you want and need.

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Sleep Study Preparation Information

In addition to ensuring that your sleep study is accurate and your sleeping disorder is diagnosed correctly, we have also worked hard to ensure that your overnight stay with us comfortable and pleasant. You’ll be sure to enjoy our centers’ “bed-and-breakfast” atmosphere, continental breakfast in the morning, and our other pleasing amenities.

However, we also recognize that many of our patients are understandably concerned about other details, such as when to arrive, what to bring with them, and the like.

Below you’ll find our sleep study guidelines, which should answer your questions and help you prepare for your test.

Our Centers’ Policies

The vast majority of our sleep studies require an overnight stay in one of our comfortable sleep centers. Please arrive at 9 pm.

Our centers are smoke-free environments and therefore, smoking is not allowed inside our buildings.

Please contact your testing center if you have a bad cold or are experiencing severe nasal or chest congestion on the day of your study.

Your sleep study is a medical test, therefore, family members and / or friends can bring you to the center and stay only until initial study preparation begins.

If you are a diabetic with specialized dietary requirements or have other special needs, please inform your sleep technician when you arrive.

What To Do Before You Arrive For Your Study

Oils and moisturizers on your skin and hair may interfere with our ability to attach electrodes to your skin or scalp. Therefore, please bathe or shower before you arrive and shampoo your hair. You may use deodorant if you’d like, but please do not use moisturizers, hair spray, makeup, or other hair oils.

Please do not consume any alcohol or caffeine beverages after 12 noon on the day of your study.

If you are taking prescription drugs, please take them at your normal time(s) – unless otherwise prescribed by your doctor – on the day of your study. However, do not bring your medications with you to the study.

However, do not bring your medications with you to the study. Please do not take a nap on the day of your study.

Eat your “normal” meals – including dinner – on the day of your study.

– including dinner – on the day of your study. You may bring over-the-counter medications with you such as Tylenol, Advil, Zantac, and the like. Please inform your sleep technologist of any medications you’ve already taken and / or plan on taking on the night of your study.

Items to Bring With You

Loose-fitting two-piece cotton pajamas – sweat suits, t-shirts, shorts, and pants are also fine.

– sweat suits, t-shirts, shorts, and pants are also fine. Your favorite blanket, pillow, stuffed animal, etc.

Personal toiletries such as toothpaste, mouth wash, soap, etc.

such as toothpaste, mouth wash, soap, etc. Books, magazines, or other reading material.

Multimedia equipment such as CDs, iPods, cell phones, laptops, headsets, etc.**

** Please Note: Although you may use mobile phone and internet devices such as cell phones, blackberries, iPhones, and computer laptops prior to your study, you will be asked to turn them off once preparation for your study begins.

What To Expect When You Arrive

What Really Happens During a Sleep Study?

You may have heard of a sleep study, and maybe even have a general idea about what it is. But there are a lot of misconceptions out there, not to mention the thought of being studied while asleep is a bit unsettling. Rest assured, though. A sleep study is nothing like the alien abduction probing scenario you might have in your imagination.

Why should I do a sleep study?

The scientific name for a sleep study test is a polysomnography, or a PSG. During your PSG, a sleep specialist will watch for a number of different events, including brain wave activity, eye movement, muscle tone, heart rhythm, and breathing.

You may want to consider having a sleep study done if you frequently snore. Snoring is a problem, both for you and anyone sleeping close by. It can also be a warning that a more serious problem is lurking. A sleep study can address these problems by helping doctors identify what’s happening in your sleep. If being under snooze surveillance makes you nervous, though, keep reading to get the facts and calm your fears. The unknown is scary, but knowledge is courage!

So what really happens in a sleep study?

A PSG might be performed at a sleep center, which requires a one or two night stay at the facility, but some sleep studies can be performed at home. This depends on the severity of your sleep problems as determined by your sleep specialist.Many people believe that the sleep test center is cold and harshly lit but, in fact, sleep studies are conducted in comfortable, hotel-like rooms to make the environment conducive to sleep. You can bring your own pillow, watch TV, read, and even wear your pajamas.

A series of electrodes and monitors will be placed on your head, chest, and legs. The electrodes are easy to get used to so they won’t hinder you from falling asleep comfortably. This will measure how many apneas, or paused breathing incidences, that you have throughout the night. It will also monitor brain wave activity, eye movement, muscle tone, heart rhythm, and breathing.

What does a sleep study tell us?

The results of your PSG may take up to a couple weeks. The test results contain important information such as:

Sleep and wake times

Sleep stages

Abnormal breathing

Blood oxygen content

Movement during the night

Some sleep specialists might give you a Respiratory Distress Index, or RDI, with your sleep test results. An RDI can tell you just how severe your sleep apnea is. A normal RDI consists of less than 10 apneas during the night. 16 or more apneas in a night may indicate sleep apnea.

Using this information and looking at your medical history, your doctor will make a diagnosis and a treatment plan that meets your needs. Though CPAP machines have become the standard solution for sleep breathing problems, there are many alternatives available.

OK, what happens next?

If it’s suspected that you have obstructive sleep apnea, your doctor will have you come in again for a second study using a CPAP machine. This second study would be to determine how much pressure is necessary to prevent an airway collapse.

Sometimes your disturbances are not due to sleep apnea, but another sleep condition like period limb movement disorder, sleep-related seizure disorders, or even restless leg syndrome. Whatever the problem is, a sleep test will help narrow it down so that it can be treated properly.

Listening to your body is important for managing a number of possible sleep disorders. Don’t keep yourself in the dark any longer; if you think there could be a problem, find out for sure with a sleep study. Make an appointment to discuss your unique sleep issues and schedule your sleep study with Dr. Pasha in Houston today.

Watching TV, listening to music before bed can actually help you get BETTER sleep

NEWARK, Del. — Can’t fall asleep without having the TV on while in bed? Turns out you may be doing yourself a favor. Research reveals that catching up on your favorite sitcom or listening to some music before bedtime could ensure a better night’s sleep.

There’s no shortage of studies warning that exposure to screens in bed could disrupt sleep patterns. One study shows that even exposure to a small amount of light can harm a child’s sleep rhythms. this latest study suggests that that watching a show for an hour or less in bed before “lights out” can actually lead to a longer slumber.

The caveat though — you’ll sleep better as long as there is no multitasking involved.

For the research, 58 adults kept a diary for recording information related to time spent using media before bed, the location of the usage, and how much multitasking each person did. Researchers examined how sleep might be impacted by media use, such as watching movies, TV, YouTube videos, browsing the Internet, or listening to music. Electroencephalography — tests that detect electrical activity in the brain using small metal discs attached to the scalp — captured measurements such as bedtime, total sleep time, and sleep quality.

If you watch TV in bed, ‘keep it a short, focused session’

Study lead author Dr. Morgan Ellithorpe from the University of Delaware reports that brief media use led to participants getting to bed earlier in the night. If they avoided multitasking while in bed, these participants also slept longer than their peers.

However, participants spending long periods of time online or watching TV ended up sleeping less. Interestingly, the team did not find a link between sleep quality and media use before bed.

“If you are going to use media, like watching TV or listening to music, before bed, keep it a short, focused session and you are unlikely to experience any negative outcomes in your sleep that night,” Dr. Ellithorpe says in a media release.

The study is published in the Journal of Sleep Research.

South West News Service writer Stephen Beech contributed to this report.

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