Skip to content
Home » Can You Use Spruce For A Sauna | What Is The Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar Vs Cedar The 73 Top Answers

Can You Use Spruce For A Sauna | What Is The Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar Vs Cedar The 73 Top Answers

Are you looking for the topic “Can you use spruce for a sauna – What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar VS Cedar“? We answer all your questions at the website https://tw.taphoamini.com in category: https://tw.taphoamini.com/photos. You will find the answer right below. The article written by the author Northern Saunas has 5,993 views and 39 likes likes.

Spruce is particularly suitable for the construction of sauna rooms, because the wood is strong enough, has a fine-pored structure, and has many small sections to create a particularly pleasant atmosphere.First and foremost, when constructing a sauna, choose a softwood as it will better absorb heat released from steam. Additionally, softwood will not be too hot to the touch. Hardwoods, on the other hand, heat up quickly. Ideal varieties of softwoods are spruce, pine and cedar.BEST WOOD FOR YOUR OUTDOOR WOOD-BURNING SAUNA

Recommended Fuel Wood Types: Oak, Birch, Maple, Ash, Grey Box, Ironbark. Recommended Building Wood Types: Cedar, Oak, Aspen, Pine, Hemlock, Spruce. Trees that contain sap may release fumes or burning liquid when ignited and should be avoided.

6 MOST POPULAR SAUNA WOOD TYPES EXPLAINED
  1. CEDAR (WESTERN RED CEDAR & EASTERN WHITE CEDAR) Cedar is one of the most popular and traditional sauna wood types, especially for outdoor saunas. …
  2. HEMLOCK. (CANADIAN HEMLOCK AND WESTERN HEMLOCK) …
  3. NORDIC SPRUCE. …
  4. COMMON ASPEN. …
  5. DOUGLAS FIR. …
  6. PINE.

Table of Contents

Watch a video on the topic Can you use spruce for a sauna

Please continue to watch videos on this topic Can you use spruce for a sauna – What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar VS Cedar here. Look carefully and give us feedback about what you are reading!

What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar VS Cedar – Can you use spruce for a sauna, details of this topic

What is the best wood for a sauna!?
We’re revisiting the main characteristics and properties of each wood for infrared sauna, their advantages, disadvantages, aesthetic looks, durability, allergenic qualities, textures and more…
Traditional sauna or infrared sauna are one of the best way to detoxify, boosts metabolism and recover you body from training or injury.
For further information, articles, tips, tricks, strategies for optimized sweating and how to create an unparalleled infrared sauna experience. Make sure to subscribe to our channel and to
join our private facebook group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/saunabenefits/
Visite our website: https://www.northernsaunas.com
FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIAS :
Quora : https://www.quora.com/profile/Gabriel-Chabotino
Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/northernsaunas/?hl=fr
Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/NorthernSaunas
Facebook Group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/saunabenefits/
As always,
Sweat Safely !

See more information on the topic Can you use spruce for a sauna here:

What Type of Wood Should be Used to Make a Sauna? – Hunker

Make sure to find a variety of wood that combines quality with low cost. Spruce is a wonderful option. Cedar, on the other hand, can be quite costly. With wood …

+ Read more

Source: www.hunker.com

Date Published: 11/26/2021

View: 1897

Most Popular Sauna Wood Types Explained

However, like Spruce, if Pine has been thermally treated, it becomes another wood type altogether – stronger and more durable. SAUNA WOOD TYPE …

+ Click here for details

Source: mysaunaworld.com

Date Published: 10/15/2021

View: 6409

Sauna: Which wood for the Sauna? – Garden&Home blog

Especially as exterior cladding, but also in interior design, the so-called Nordic spruce is used, which would be more correct: polar spruce or Scandinavian …

+ Read more here

Source: www.garden-and-home.co.uk

Date Published: 2/10/2022

View: 5526

Sauna Wood (and Why It Matters)

Eucalyptus, basswood, cedar and even thermo-spruce are some of the best types of soft wood for long-lasting saunas. There’s nothing worse than a …

+ Read more

Source: northernsaunas.com

Date Published: 1/2/2021

View: 3426

Types of wood for saunas – Infraworld Infrarotkabinen

Nordic spruce Softline profile. Very slow growth of spruce trunks in extreme cold makes the wood particularly resistant. Only in this way can it meet our …

+ View more here

Source: www.infrarotwaermekabinen.at

Date Published: 1/12/2022

View: 7809

Wood Paneling for Your Sauna Hot Room – Saunatimes

Other common species include basswood, spruce, and aspen. These are softer woods, which are more prone to rot and decay. But with good ventilation, and …

+ Click here

Source: www.saunatimes.com

Date Published: 5/24/2022

View: 8994

Nordic Spruce Paneling and Matching Lumber

Nordic Spruce sauna wood paneling is a great choice for any resential or commercial sauna. The quality rustic look (with small tight knots) is very …

+ View here

Source: superiorsaunas.com

Date Published: 9/10/2022

View: 4320

What is the BEST WOOD for Sauna Construction (Benches …

Spruce is a very light colored wood with a fine grain. It is commonly used in Finnish Saunas. Spruce is cheaper than other options like Cedar …

+ Read more

Source: heatandsteam.com

Date Published: 2/25/2021

View: 1314

3 Types of Sauna Wood – DoItYourself.com

Spruce is used for creating a Nordic sauna. A design that is found in Finnish areas. Spruce is a white wood with fine grains and light small …

+ Show more here

Source: www.doityourself.com

Date Published: 3/16/2021

View: 9987

Images related to the topic Can you use spruce for a sauna

Please see some more pictures related to the topic What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar VS Cedar. You can see more related images in the comments, or see more related articles if needed.

What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna - Poplar VS Cedar
What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar VS Cedar

Rate articles on topics Can you use spruce for a sauna

  • Author: Northern Saunas
  • Views: 5,993 views
  • Likes: 39 likes
  • Date Published: Jan 31, 2019
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-PbFacwgHg

What kind of wood can I use in a sauna?

6 MOST POPULAR SAUNA WOOD TYPES EXPLAINED
  1. CEDAR (WESTERN RED CEDAR & EASTERN WHITE CEDAR) Cedar is one of the most popular and traditional sauna wood types, especially for outdoor saunas. …
  2. HEMLOCK. (CANADIAN HEMLOCK AND WESTERN HEMLOCK) …
  3. NORDIC SPRUCE. …
  4. COMMON ASPEN. …
  5. DOUGLAS FIR. …
  6. PINE.

Can you use pine wood in a sauna?

First and foremost, when constructing a sauna, choose a softwood as it will better absorb heat released from steam. Additionally, softwood will not be too hot to the touch. Hardwoods, on the other hand, heat up quickly. Ideal varieties of softwoods are spruce, pine and cedar.

What is the best wood to burn in a sauna?

BEST WOOD FOR YOUR OUTDOOR WOOD-BURNING SAUNA

Recommended Fuel Wood Types: Oak, Birch, Maple, Ash, Grey Box, Ironbark. Recommended Building Wood Types: Cedar, Oak, Aspen, Pine, Hemlock, Spruce. Trees that contain sap may release fumes or burning liquid when ignited and should be avoided.

What materials can be used in a sauna?

First, consider the wood used in the sauna. FIR saunas are often made of spruce, redwood, hemlock, poplar, basswood or cedar. Cedar has long been the go-to choice and continues to be the top option of infrared saunas today. The best type of cedar is Western Red Canadian Cedar.

Do you need special wood for a sauna?

It’s important to find a soft wood that can soak up steam and deal with heat absorption without any type of long-term damage. Eucalyptus, basswood, cedar and even thermo-spruce are some of the best types of soft wood for long-lasting saunas.

Are cedar saunas toxic?

4 Cedar, spruce, pine, basswood, fir, teak, and hemlock wood contain and emit toxic phenols that enter the body by skin contact, exposure, and inhalation.

How long will a pine sauna last?

Resistance to Rot and Fungi – Due to the heating process breaking down hemicellulose, the wood doesn’t contain the appropriate nutrients to allow rot and fungi to grow and develop. Increased Longevity – When wood is treated with heat, its average life span is prolonged meaning your sauna will last a lifetime!

Is poplar good for a sauna?

Poplar has the least wood odor of any wood used to build saunas. To the average person, poplar means a much more comfortable sauna. The strong wood odors of cedar and other woods do not dissipate much with time and end up being a constant distraction when you are looking for “the zone” relaxing in your sauna.

How thick should sauna walls be?

Thickness is one of the most important aspects of your new outdoor sauna because the thickness of the wall logs means greater insulation. Most wall thicknesses are 1-3/8” to 1-1/2” and 1-5/8”.

Can you use a normal wood stove for a sauna?

A sauna wood stove is traditionally used in saunas as it does not require electricity. Without needing an electric current, you can build your sauna wherever you want without the need for an electrician. Your heater will also not require any heating elements that can eventually wear out and require replacement.

Can a regular wood stove be used for a sauna?

Can You Use a Wood Stove In A Sauna? Some homeowners worry about using a wood-burning stove in a sauna, thinking that it may pose a fire risk. However, a sauna wood burning stove is both a safe and traditional choice for heating your sauna.

Which wood produces the most heat?

Osage orange.

Osage orange wood has the highest heat value of any hardwood — it can burn hot enough to warp a wood stove!

What can I use for sauna walls?

Saunas produce high temperatures and moisture levels, so the materials used matter: Wall insulation should be fiberglass batt. A foil-faced vapor barrier should be used over the insulation, and any seams should overlap by at least 4 inches.

Is it cheaper to build your own sauna?

Many homeowners would love a sauna, but many don’t think the cost is justified. You can expect to pay an average of $4,500 to add a sauna to your abode.

Typical Cost for Building a Sauna.
Type of Cost Amount
Highest Cost $6,000
Lowest Cost $3,000
30 thg 11, 2021

What kind of wood do you use to build a sauna?

This describes a special wood from Africa. Depending on the country of origin, the processing technology of round logs also differs significantly. These are particularly eye-catching in terms of price and quality. The abachi tree is considered to be the most widely distributed tree in all of Africa. For a long time, this kind of wood has been very important in many countries because it has good properties and can be used in many different fields. The abachi tree is very large, with its roots several meters high.

Characteristics of Abachi wood

The density of tree trunks may vary from location to location. Due to its light weight and low hardness, almost all tools can easily process abachi trees. After a short cooking process, high-quality finishes can be produced. Technical and natural drying is particularly fast. Fresh abachi wood usually smells very unpleasant, but this smell will disappear during the drying process. Abachi can be processed and cleaned by almost any method. In addition, it is difficult to heat up, which is why it is often used as a bench in a sauna room. But good insulation properties also make it a very special kind of wood. Due to the low hardness, the close fit of nails and screws is affected. Abachi is a particularly durable wood because its shrinkage value has proven to be very favorable. Moist wood is always susceptible to fungus attack. The closed surface requires filler because it has a particularly low density. Abachi is often used indoors. As solid wood, it is used in strips, door trims, intermediate layers, models, body structures, and shoemaking and packaging. However, it is mainly found in sauna rooms.

Why Abachi wood is particularly suitable for building saunas?

Everyone who starts planning a sauna must decide on the appropriate type of wood. Not all woods are the same, and not every wood is suitable for sauna room construction. In addition to the wood of Spruce, which is particularly cheap and has a typical sauna smell, Canadian Red Cedar, hemlock and finally abachi wood are particularly suitable. Canadian Red Cedar is particularly suitable because of its high stability. Hemlock has a very natural pattern, so the overall appearance looks very familiar. Abachi wood has some special functions, so it’s suitable for any saunas.

The African tree species grows extremely fast, which means that it cannot be classified as an endangered wood. It is still very bright, resin-free, and almost completely unknotted. Abachi wood has a particularly poor heat absorption property, so it is very suitable for use as a bench and backrest in a sauna room. Abachi is a species of Malvaceae, a tropical wood, but it should not be confused with tropical wood from Asia. Abachi can be obtained sustainably. Since it has almost no debris, it is more suitable for use in the seating area than any other type of wood.

What Type of Wood Should be Used to Make a Sauna?

There are several factors that go into the overall design of a sauna, including the critical step of choosing the right wood. Saunas are designed for relaxation. They are a warm, soothing sanctuary for sweating and detoxing. That said, it’s essential to ensure premium comfort by making sure problems don’t arise, especially as a result of faulty design. A sauna that is too hot, cool or emitting fumes is no fun for anyone. Additionally, there are several things to consider when choosing the right wood, including the material. While softwood is the best option, affordability and whether the wood contains sap, knots, stains or paint are all critical considerations when selecting materials.

Advertisement

What Type of Wood Should be Used to Make a Sauna? Image Credit: Ridofranz/iStock/GettyImages See More Photos

Video of the Day

Softwood 101

First and foremost, when constructing a sauna, choose a softwood as it will better absorb heat released from steam. Additionally, softwood will not be too hot to the touch. Hardwoods, on the other hand, heat up quickly. Ideal varieties of softwoods are spruce, pine and cedar.

Advertisement

Spruce is a light wood, mostly found in Nordic regions, such as Finland. It’s both practical and cost effective. Pine is similar to spruce, except that it has larger knots which fall out when dry. Finally, cedar wood is rich in color, resilient to rotting and emits a pleasant odor when heated. That said, not all are in favor of using cedar wood to build a sauna. Energy Mizers, Inc. claims that cedar creates mold, looks dirty after a short period of time and can spur breathing problems. For these reasons, spruce and pine may be your best options.

Advertisement

Scrap Sap

Try to avoid woods that contain sap. These woods can release unsafe fumes and extremely hot liquid that can burn you. To avoid sap and seepage, choose quality pine, cedar or spruce.

Advertisement

Not Knotty

The knottiness of the wood should be taken into account when constructing a sauna. Knotty wood is usually more dense and not appropriate for use in sauna construction, and it often contains sap.

Advertisement

Steer Clear of Stain and Paint

Probably the most important consideration when selecting wood for your sauna is to make sure it is not stained or painted. Both stains and paints can release harmful toxins when the sauna is in use. Leave your wood completely and thoroughly natural.

Advertisement

Consider Cost

Make sure to find a variety of wood that combines quality with low cost. Spruce is a wonderful option. Cedar, on the other hand, can be quite costly.

With wood that’s soft, affordable, free from paint or stain, knots and sap, you can enjoy your long-lasting, safe sauna without stress or concern.

WHY SAUNA MATERIALS MATTER

Far infrared or FIR saunas vary in shape, size, material, and construction. Every element that makes up your sauna will have an effect on the level of health benefits (or risks) it provides. Some saunas contain potentially harmful materials as a cheap alternative to more quality sauna materials. These types of shortcuts aren’t worth investing in for the sauna you choose for your home or business.

Sauna Wood

First, consider the wood used in the sauna. FIR saunas are often made of spruce, redwood, hemlock, poplar, basswood or cedar. Cedar has long been the go-to choice and continues to be the top option of infrared saunas today. The best type of cedar is Western Red Canadian Cedar. Be sure the cedar used in the sauna is sustainable sourced and eco-friendly.

Cedar is resistant to cracking and splitting when heated and cooled since it’s a soft wood. It’s also the longest lasting sauna wood available. It naturally eliminates the presence of molds and bacteria – and important consideration as you decide on sauna materials, since the warm and moist area of a sauna is a prime environment for both. Finally, Western Red Canadian cedar is non-aromatic cedar and has a very faint cedar smell so even the most sensitive people will love their cedar infrared sauna.

Sauna Heaters

The heater in your sauna is an important sauna material for obvious reasons, since it will be responsible for the type of experience you receive in your sauna. There are two main types of heaters to consider: carbon and ceramic. Carbon panel heaters are larger in size, distribute infrared heat more evenly, and produce high quality, long wave infrared heat, but typically, at a weaker level.

Ceramic-based heaters emit a greater amount of infrared heat than carbon panels, but create hot spots in the sauna and produce lower quality shorter infrared waves. A combination of the two provides the best of both worlds providing beneficial long wave infrared heat and a lot of it.

What Type of Wood Should be Used to Make a Sauna?

There are several factors that go into the overall design of a sauna, including the critical step of choosing the right wood. Saunas are designed for relaxation. They are a warm, soothing sanctuary for sweating and detoxing. That said, it’s essential to ensure premium comfort by making sure problems don’t arise, especially as a result of faulty design. A sauna that is too hot, cool or emitting fumes is no fun for anyone. Additionally, there are several things to consider when choosing the right wood, including the material. While softwood is the best option, affordability and whether the wood contains sap, knots, stains or paint are all critical considerations when selecting materials.

Advertisement

What Type of Wood Should be Used to Make a Sauna? Image Credit: Ridofranz/iStock/GettyImages See More Photos

Video of the Day

Softwood 101

First and foremost, when constructing a sauna, choose a softwood as it will better absorb heat released from steam. Additionally, softwood will not be too hot to the touch. Hardwoods, on the other hand, heat up quickly. Ideal varieties of softwoods are spruce, pine and cedar.

Advertisement

Spruce is a light wood, mostly found in Nordic regions, such as Finland. It’s both practical and cost effective. Pine is similar to spruce, except that it has larger knots which fall out when dry. Finally, cedar wood is rich in color, resilient to rotting and emits a pleasant odor when heated. That said, not all are in favor of using cedar wood to build a sauna. Energy Mizers, Inc. claims that cedar creates mold, looks dirty after a short period of time and can spur breathing problems. For these reasons, spruce and pine may be your best options.

Advertisement

Scrap Sap

Try to avoid woods that contain sap. These woods can release unsafe fumes and extremely hot liquid that can burn you. To avoid sap and seepage, choose quality pine, cedar or spruce.

Advertisement

Not Knotty

The knottiness of the wood should be taken into account when constructing a sauna. Knotty wood is usually more dense and not appropriate for use in sauna construction, and it often contains sap.

Advertisement

Steer Clear of Stain and Paint

Probably the most important consideration when selecting wood for your sauna is to make sure it is not stained or painted. Both stains and paints can release harmful toxins when the sauna is in use. Leave your wood completely and thoroughly natural.

Advertisement

Consider Cost

Make sure to find a variety of wood that combines quality with low cost. Spruce is a wonderful option. Cedar, on the other hand, can be quite costly.

With wood that’s soft, affordable, free from paint or stain, knots and sap, you can enjoy your long-lasting, safe sauna without stress or concern.

Sauna: Which wood for the Sauna?

Note

This category is not available in this country.

This item is not available in this country.

When you leave the page, the shopping cart is emptied.

When you leave the page, the notepad is deleted.

Would you still like to continue?

Yes

Back

Sauna Wood (and Why It Matters)

The Best Sauna Wood Types

Since you now know that having a sauna at home will help bring you massive health benefits, it’s time to discuss the right wood to choose for your unit. Choosing the right type of wood for your sauna is absolutely a vital step if you want your investment to last for a long time.

As a future home sauna user, the type of wood you choose for your sauna will determine the durability, the style, the texture, the longevity and even the atmosphere of each session. If you want your sauna to last you a lifetime, make sure to keep on reading as we will discuss some of the best sauna wood types available this year.

Thermowood For Optimal Durability

Thermowood is not a species of wood per say but is defined as a process in which a certain type of wood is exposed to high temperature (between 180C – 230C) in a low oxygen environment for over 30 minutes – 1 hour using water and steam ONLY.

Thermowood is a process originating from Finland in the 1990s and has been practiced using mostly Spruce (Picea Abies) and Pine as these species are some of the most common in the Scandinavian region in Europe.

Heating wood in this temperature range results in chemical modifications to the structure of the cell walls of the material: degradation of hemicelluloses which have hydrophilic properties and crosslinking of lignins signifying the formation of chemical bonds between molecules. The crystal structure of cellulose could also be changed. These modifications of the chemical components of wood affect its physical and mechanical properties.

How The Thermal Process Enhanced Wood Properties

Following the results of the work carried out within the framework of various research projects carried out at the VTT laboratories in Finland, the FCBA in France and FPlnnovations in Quebec, Canada among others, the main advantages of thermally modified wood compared to unmodified wood can be summarized as follows:

Improved dimensional stability of wood

Increased resistance to fungal degradation

New attractive colors of wood following treatment.

No reduction in elasticity following treatment

Slight improvement in wood hardness

Finally, in general, it is known that the variation in the properties of thermally modified wood is proportional to the treatment temperature. For example, the higher the temperature reached during processing, the more the resistance to fungal degradation and the dimensional stability of the product are improved.

Better resistance to fungal degradation and improved dimensional stability are properties that allow thermally modified wood to be used in exterior applications such as siding, saunas, patios or door and window joinery.

If you’re interested in exploring the Thermowood option for your sauna, we currently offer 2 outdoor barrel sauna options using Thermo-Spruce. As you will see, not only the wood properties are enhanced, but the color & the smell is also boosted. I would even argue to say that I favor Thermo-Spruce over cedar for outdoor saunas.

Basswood Against Allergies

For individuals with sensitive skins, basswood will be a premium choice. It’s light brown color coupled with it’s hypoallergenic qualities and soft texture Basswood is a tremendously durable and affordable wood option.

Basswood will not emit any fragrance or toxins and rarely contains knots which makes it very soft to touch. Classified as a hardwood it is unlikely to bend or warp over time and will be great both for residential and commercial uses.

One of the upsides for choosing Basswood over other woods would be it’s affordability. Some of our best infrared saunas are made out of basswood. I personally recommend all models made by Clearlight Infrared.

Cedar Is Almost Always A Great Choice

Used both for traditional and infrared saunas, cedar is a superb choice because of its natural resistance to moisture & temperature changes. Cedar wood saunas do not expand or contract as much as other woods when temperature fluctuates which makes it great both for indoor and outdoor applications. Furthermore the natural essential oil present in this wood smells amazing and has antibacterial properties.

Cedar just as Thermowood is especially prized for outdoor models such as outdoor barrel saunas and cabin saunas. It’s robustness and ability to withstand harsh weathers years after years with little degradation makes it hands down a top 3 pick when it comes to sauna construction.

Although pretty rare, some people have a natural sensitivity to cedar wood which gives them a runny nose, itching and flu like symptoms. If that is your case we would recommend other alternatives such as spruce, pine, basswood, aspen, hemlock or eucalyptus.

Eucalyptus A More Scarce But Interesting Option :

However quite rare, another strong & durable wood option is eucalyptus. Historically, eucalyptus has been used in cabinetry .

This premium wood is similar to teak in many regards yet slightly cheaper.

Durability & Heat Conduction

If you’ve ever climbed inside a hot vehicle and been slightly burned by leather seats, you’ve noticed the importance of material for comfort.

Similarly, saunas need a wood that remains comfortable to touch even at high heats.

Hard woods, like oak or teak, will often overheat when exposed to high temperatures for two long hence why we do not recommend them.

Considering this, make sure to select a wood that will not conduct heat as much. The ambient air must be scorching hot but your butt shall remain intact. Let’s remember we’re not cooking steaks here !

Softwoods, like eucalyptus, cedar, and basswood are all great in that regard. This why they are perfect for sauna use.

There are several types of soft wood, so it’s important to choose one that works for your sauna and your budget. Likewise, woods with excess sap in them should also be avoided. These woods can create dangerous fumes and even liquids capable of igniting when used in a hot sauna.

Heat & Sturdiness

In terms of practical woods to use, heat absorption is key. The wood for your sauna should be able to absorb the heat from the sauna without overheating. It’s important to find a soft wood that can soak up steam and deal with heat absorption without any type of long-term damage.

Eucalyptus, basswood, cedar and even thermo-spruce are some of the best types of soft wood for long-lasting saunas. There’s nothing worse than a beautiful sauna that isn’t heat resistant and won’t stand the test of time. Buying a sauna that will warp or rot will certainly be a major disappointment for those invested in long-term health benefits.

In addition to absorption, it’s also important that the sauna is affordable. Some types of wood are far more expensive than others.

As such, many people feel like saunas are a luxury item, but this often depends on the type of wood used. Saunas can be affordable for those who use the right type of material.

Another crucial issue to consider is the sturdiness of the wood. Since you can’t afford to take a chance on a flimsy sauna, it’s important to find a sturdy soft wood. This also means finding a well-built frame so the sauna can be used day after day without worry.

Indoor Vs. Outdoor Saunas

For the most part, the health benefits of an indoor sauna versus an outdoor sauna is essentially the same. Instead, the choice of indoor versus outdoor depends more on the owner, their preferences, available space, time, and budget commitments. Within this decision, of course, there are pros and cons for each option.

Outdoor saunas require a suitable electrical connection, unless they’re built for wood burning only. Since heaters require an outlet, this option isn’t for everyone.

But, with an outdoor sauna, there’s more room for creativity when it comes to design and quirks.

These saunas are perfect for individuals who want to enjoy their detox experience outside of the home.

With indoor saunas, however, the options are much easier to install as they simply need to be connected to the home’s existing electrical system.

Likewise, the home works as somewhat of a barrier for the sauna, protecting it from the weather. With interior saunas, it’s important to research dimensions with the manufacturer.

Many individuals will choose to have an infrared sauna installed in an unused space or even in a large bathroom. Whether you choose indoor or outdoor, however, it’s important to conduct research on the specific sauna to be installed.

Choosing the Right Size of Sauna

When it comes to size, you want to make sure you have enough space to move or lay down comfortably. Being in the sauna should be relaxing, you should feel at ease & safe, not claustrophobic. Of course, everyone has a limited amount of space available within the house or in the backyard so sometimes a little sacrifice in comfort is needed to be able to enjoy a good sauna daily.

After all a small sauna is better than no sauna at all !

Sauna Aesthetic 101

Some saunas have a rustic, authentic, traditional nordic look, while others have a more modern, contemporary, minimalist style. These different looks are undeniably a result of the wood used for the construction. If you’re not sure where to start your thinking process, you might want to consider a few of the questions below :

Do I want to use light colored wood such as Basswood, Pine, Hemlock or something darker like Cedar, Thermowood or Eucalyptus ?

Do I want a more rustic, raw & traditional look or something cleaner, modern and classy ? Depending on what you are looking for you might want to choose a knotted or clear wood.

In terms of aesthetics, some good guidelines would be to find a type of wood and style that already matches your current home decor or backyard set up. If you are building something completely, you might want to think about durability or what kind of sauna experience you’re trying to create, how you want to feel in the sauna.

Think of your home and how you want your future sauna to add value to it. Then, look for a model that are aligned with your goals.

For more tips, tricks, scientific studies, articles and goodies feel free to join our FREE Facebook Page below : https://www.facebook.com/NorthernSaunas

Keep it sweaty !

Gabriel from Northern Saunas

Types of wood for saunas

This website is using cookies – you can find more information on this and your rights as a user in our privacy statement at the bottom of the site. Click on “I agree to the use of all cookies” in order to accept all cookies (also from third-parties) to get a immediate access to our website, or click on ” cookie settings “, to manage the cookies yourself.

Wood Paneling for Your Sauna Hot Room

The Best Wood to Use for Paneling the Walls of a Sauna Hot Room

If you ask 5 professionals in the lumber industry what the best wood paneling for your sauna hot room is, you may get 2- 3 different answers. But the most common answer is Western Red Cedar.

Troy V. Rockwood, Ontario: My dad asked me to somehow include in the sauna project a piece of 4×4 western red cedar he’d saved since 1975.

Western Red Cedar is:

Slightly aromatic yet not smelly or overpowering.

Holds up over generations (literally).

Expensive, but readily available and is cheaper over the long haul.

Doesn’t get as hot to the touch. Soft wood. loose grained.

During construction, most sauna builders love the smell of freshly cut cedar in the morning…. smells like victory.

Other common species include basswood, spruce, and aspen. These are softer woods, which are more prone to rot and decay. But with good ventilation, and practicing the bake and breathe method, using these species for our sauna paneling can be a good choice.

How Much Paneling Do You Need for Your Sauna Hot Room?

Whether a wood fired sauna or an electric sauna, when it comes to building our own sauna, lots of folks get tripped up about how much material they’ll need to panel their hot rooms. We get our pencils out and start writing down some numbers. We scratch our left ear, do some calculations, then we scratch our forehead. “board feet, lineal feet, square feet, oh, my! I’m not a total idiot here, but why is this so hard?” I’ve built a bunch of saunas and still, I get tripped up on this.

Let’s Walk Through How to Do It

What is the square feet of your sauna hot room?

Add up the length of all four walls. Take that number and multiply it by height of your sauna hot room. This number is the square feet of your walls. But you also need to add the square feet of your ceiling. Easy. Multiply the length times the width of your hot room. At these two numbers together. This is the square feet of your sauna room.

Subtract for windows, doors and add for trim.

Here’s the secret. Chances are if you measure all that stuff, then add back in what you’re needing for trim, odds are that your numbers are going to be pretty close to each other. So, just go with #1 (and maybe a little more for mistakes, etc.).

Now you have TOTAL square feet of material you’ll need to panel your sauna hot room. But we need to convert this to board feet. uggh.. this is so hard to explain.

Let me just try to roll through an example.

7’+7’+7’+7′ = 28′ That’s the perimeter of my hot room

7′ That’s the height of my hot room.

28′ – perimeter of hot room

x7′ – height of hot room

196′ = that’s the square feet of my walls

7′ – length of one wall

+7′ – length of the adjacent wall

14′ = square feet of my ceiling

196′ – square feet of walls

+49′ – square feet of ceiling

~ 250 = square feet of sauna.

5″ exposed height of t&g paneling

x12″ number of inches in a foot.

60″ – square inches of 1′ of paneling.

x.00694444 – 1 Sq. Inch = 0.00694444444 Sq. Foot (this is a formula number)

0.41664 – square feet of one board foot of 5″ paneling.

/ 250′ – square feet of sauna.

600 – lineal feet of 5″ paneling needed to panel my sauna.

/ 14′ – length of boards.

43- number of 14′ boards needed to panel my sauna.

This is the best way I know how to figure out the number of cedar boards to panel my saunas. Again, there’s all kinds of weeds we can get tangled in, trying to subtract for windows and doors and durock corners behind our sauna stoves I’ve built my share of saunas. It’s crazy how subtracting for all that is about the same amount you’ll want on hand for ripping trim and making a sauna hot room door. So, order 37 boards, 14′ long and let’s start paneling our hot room!

Money Saving Tips for Wood Paneling

Here in Minnesota, we use Western Red Cedar for our sauna hot room wood paneling. In Scandinavia, many saunas are paneled with White Spruce. Both these species are not cheap, but definitely, definitely stay away from Pine. I will fill you in why another day. Don’t be tempted by compromising on wood species. SHS Roofing, or any other home improvement experts for that matter, can help you understand the importance of using good and durable materials when building a structure. They can provide you fiscally responsible and good quality suggestions for construction. Focus more on reducing your required square footage instead of using cheap materials.

Reducing the Amount of Premium Paneling Needed for Your Hot Room

These are my tips for wood paneling for your sauna hot room, and you may let us know if you have any more tips along these lines. Just start typing in the comments below.

What is the BEST WOOD for Sauna Construction (Benches, Walls, Floors)

What is the best wood for building a sauna?

I became interested in saunas after hearing about all the health benefits and how it helped muscle growth, and caused you to live longer. But while I may have come for the health benefits, I stayed for the experience itself–the enjoyable aesthetic and the relaxing atmosphere.

The physiological effect of heat may rejuvenate the body, but the experience of the sauna will rejuvenate the spirit.

The foundation of a good sauna experience is the design and build of the sauna itself. This all starts with finding the best wood for constructing your sauna.

So what is the best wood for constructing a sauna? Cedar is the best all-around wood for sauna construction. It allows heat to dissipate so that it doesn’t get too hot to the touch and it is a beautiful reddish color with very few knots. Additionally, cedar gives off a pleasant natural aroma.

While many people like the scent of cedar, there are plenty of people who don’t.

If you want a scentless sauna, then Poplar wood is a nice alternative to cedar, hemlock and pine. It has a clean and crisp look to it and has relatively few nots. In fact, poplar is commonly used in medical facilities because of its lack of allergens and toxins.

At the beginning of this article I will explain some basic factors to consider–like the difference of hardwoods versus softwoods and the presence of wood phenols which give wood its scent. Then I will discuss the types of wood commonly used in saunas. Finally, I tell you the best type of wood to use in your sauna walls, floor and benches.

Heatandsteam.com may receive commissions on purchases made from the links on this page.

Understanding Softwoods vs Hardwoods

Softwoods come from conifer (evergreen) trees. These are the ones with needles. Cedar, hemlock and pine are softwoods that are commonly used in saunas.

Hardwoods come from deciduous trees–these are the ones with leaves. Poplar, basswood, eucalyptus are examples of hardwood.

Deciduous trees tend to grow slower than conifer trees. This causes the wood from deciduous trees to be more dense and harder than the less dense and softer wood of conifers.

Softwood is easier to cut. Hardwood is stronger and more durable. Even though softwood is usually weaker than hardwood, softwood is strong enough and durable enough to be used in saunas.

Perhaps most importantly, softwood is generally cheaper than hardwood.

When hardwood absorbs sauna heat it tends to get hotter and be less comfortable to the touch.

Types of Woods used in Saunas

Softwoods:

Cedar

Cedar is one of the most commonly used woods in sauna construction. Because cedar is low density, cedar does not become hot to the touch. Cedar gives of a strong scent, which most people enjoy. The phenols which give it its strong sent are mold resistant.

The downside of cedar is that it is more expensive than other woods. Also, some sauna users find the scent of cedar to be overpowering. If you don’t like the scent of cedar, don’t expect it to disappear. You should select a different wood for your sauna.

Hemlock

Hemlock is a cheaper alternative to cedar. Like cedar, hemlock has a reddish brown color. Like cedar, hemlock has a fragrance, and is a good choice for those looking for a fragrant wood.

Hemlock tends to have knots, making it less ideal than cedar.

Pine

Pine is a light colored wood that looks similar to spruce, with the exception that it tends to have knots. As you would expect, it can give off a pine scent. Pine is one of the cheapest options for sauna construction.

The downside of Pine is that these knots can fall out and leave holes in your sauna. While there are treatments commercially available to deal with this issue, you should research any treatment that you are considering to be sure that it is not toxic.

Spruce

Spruce is a very light colored wood with a fine grain. It is commonly used in Finnish Saunas.

Spruce is cheaper than other options like Cedar and Hemlock.

Hardwoods:

Basswood

Basswood is a light colored hardwood. It has little to no fragrance and is a good choice for those who wish to avoid the strong scent of cedar.

Basswood is also usually cheaper than other hardwood alternatives.

Poplar

Poplar is a hardwood. It is light colored, though usually slightly darker than basswood. Poplar is often used in medical facilities because it is odorless and hypoallergenic.

As a hardwood, Poplar will be hotter to the touch than softwood alternatives. It is more expensive than cedar or hemlock.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is a reddish brown hardwood which grows in Australia. Eucalyptus grows quickly and is environmentally friendly as it can be replanted and regrown.

Although Eucalyptus is a great option for a sauna, it is typically more expensive than other woods on this list.

The Scent of Wood

If you like the fresh woody smell of softwoods like cedar and hemlock, then the good news is that these scents will persist over time, lasting for months or even years.

The bad news is that if you DON’T like the scent of softwoods, the scent can last for months or even years. For this reason, you should pay special attention to your personal preference, because no matter how much you try to air it out, the scent will likely be with you for some time.

Are Phenols Toxic

Phenols are aromatic chemicals that frequently occur in nature. They are both inhaled and absorbed through the pores in the skin.

Phenols are technically toxic, however, most of the phenols that people encounter are relatively harmless. Phenols are found in food. And phenols are even used in soaps and mouth wash because of their antibacterial properties.

Some woods, like pine, and especially cedar, are known to contain phenols. It is phenols which give wood its fragrance.

To most people, naturally occurring wood phenols are harmless, but people with particular sensitivities or people who are prone to allergies should avoid saunas made from cedar and other fragrant woods.

Never Use Synthetic Wood in a Sauna

Composite woods are made of a mixture of wood fibers, plastics, glues and other binding agents. Composite woods often contain formaldehyde, which is both an irritant and a known carcinogen.

In the United States, composite wood must meet certain formaldehyde emission standards, before it can be commercially sold in furniture. This doesn’t mean it should be used in constructing saunas because the heat and humidity of the sauna is likely to exacerbate this formaldehyde emission problem.

Oils, stains, laminates, glues, putties, and other adhesives should not be used in a sauna construction because they can give off toxins. Also the heat and humidity of a sauna is likely to cause them to degrade prematurely anyway. This is why saunas should always be built with stainless steel screws.

What is the Best wood for Sauna Walls and Benches

A softwood like cedar or hemlock will be the most pleasant surface for your bare skin. For this reason, these softwoods are ideal for benches and for any walls which are likely to serve as a back rest.

One trick to save money in the construction of your sauna would be to use more expensive woods like cedar or hemlock for your benches and backrests, while using cheaper woods like spruce or pine for framing and walls.

While haphazardly mixing wood types won’t look great, if you mix contrasting colored woods and arrange them with care, you have the potential to create a beautifully two-toned sauna.

What is the Best wood for Sauna floors

Perhaps the best wood for a sauna floor is no wood at all.

Since the floor is the ultimate destination for most of the humidity in the sauna, a more durable and non-absorbent material like ceramic tile or even concrete may be your best bet. Keep in mind, concrete can be polished into a beautifully smooth surface.

If you want to keep with the wood theme, then your best option is to purchase hardwood sauna floor tiles. The surface of these tiles have wooden slats. The slats rest on top of a plastic or rubber layer which will allow water to pass through to the sauna drain.

Hardwood slats are recommended, since they will be more durable than softwood. Consider these ones made from teak wood.

Best Wood: Traditional Saunas vs Infrared Saunas

The important thing to know about traditional saunas versus infrared saunas is that the wood in a traditional sauna will be subject to more extreme conditions than that of an infrared sauna.

Because the air temperature is significantly hotter (170℉) and because of the increased humidity caused by steam, the wood in a traditional sauna will experience much more stress.

Infrared saunas are much cooler (120℉) because the heating panels heat the body rather than the air. Without the steam, the boards will swell less in the dryer air.

While I would never recommend that anyone purchase low quality wood for their sauna, you should take into account that the wood of an infrared sauna does not need to be quite as durable as that of an infrared sauna.

Wood Treatment and Caring for Sauna Wood

You must be about any treatments applied to the wood in your sauna. You should never paint your sauna, you should also avoid applying any stains and varnishes which are toxic and will release toxins into the air.

In caring for the wood in your sauna, you really shouldn’t need anything other than a good sauna oil, like this one.

Some wood oils don’t fare well in high temperatures and will even produce smoke. It is essential that you make sure that you choose an oil that has specifically been tested for use on wood.

Click to read this article about cleaning and caring for your sauna.

3 Types of Sauna Wood

3 Types of Sauna Wood

To ensure our content is always up-to-date with current information, best practices, and professional advice, articles are routinely reviewed by industry experts with years of hands-on experience.

Selecting the perfect type of wood is essential for the overall design of a sauna. The wood should be a softwood that will absorb the heat emitted from the steam of the sauna. There are many different types of wood that can be used for sauna construction.

Spruce

Spruce is used for creating a Nordic sauna. A design that is found in Finnish areas. Spruce is a white wood with fine grains and light small knots in its design. Spruce will darken slightly over its lifetime but will generally remain a light wood. Spruce is amongst the more cost-effective wood used for building a sauna.

Pine

White pine can also be used, and when it is new, it will look similar to Nordic spruce. Pine has larger knots in it which will fall out when the wood becomes dry. To prolong the knots, pine should be treated when being used as a sauna wood.

Cedar

Cedar is a very popular choice of sauna wood because of its light appearance and its resilience to decay but it is more expensive than other woods. Cedar has a natural aroma that can be very pleasant in a sauna and it will cope extremely well with the increased temperatures within the steam room.

Information about keywords Can you use spruce for a sauna

Below are the search results of topic Can you use spruce for a sauna on Bing. You can read more if needed.

See also  Hustle Soul Line Dancers From Delaware Valley | Soul Line Dancing In Delaware Trust The Answer
See also  Can You Start Lump Charcoal In A Chimney Starter | Lighting A Grill With A Chimney Using Lump Charcoal | Briquettes Vs. Lump Charcoal | Tip Of The Week Top Answer Update

See also  Did Humans Used To Have More Nipples | This Is Why Some People Have Extra Nipples 10730 Good Rating This Answer

The article has been edited from various sources on the internet. I hope you found this article useful. Please share this article if you find it useful. Thank you very much!

Keywords people often search for about the topic What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar VS Cedar

  • infrared sauna
  • traditional sauna
  • best wood sauna
  • cedar wood sauna
  • poplar wood sauna
  • sauna detox
  • saunas
  • northern saunas
  • saunacore

What #Is #the #Best #Wood #For #Your #Infrared #Sauna #- #Poplar #VS #Cedar


Watch some other videos of topic Can you use spruce for a sauna on youtube

So you have finished reading the What Is the Best Wood For Your Infrared Sauna – Poplar VS Cedar | Can you use spruce for a sauna topic article, if you find this article useful, please share it. Thank you very much.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *