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Home » Can You Use Solo Stove On Balcony | The Truth About The Solo Stove Bonfire – (And Why I Wouldn’T Buy It Again) The 15 Latest Answer

Can You Use Solo Stove On Balcony | The Truth About The Solo Stove Bonfire – (And Why I Wouldn’T Buy It Again) The 15 Latest Answer

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Solo Stoves are safe to use on both wood or Trex decking, provided you also use the Solo Stove stand or a heat-resistant fire pit barrier underneath. Although Solo Stoves emit less heat than other types of fire pits, they could still damage your deck over prolonged periods of use.A solo stove should not be placed directly on a wood deck, as this can cause damage over time. Instead, a solo stove should have a stand and preferably a fireproof mat underneath it. There are benefits to using both, but the solo stand is an absolute necessity.Solo Stove fire pits can be stored outside with an appropriate weather cover. Check out Solo Stove Shelter, an outdoor weather cover designed specifically for use with a Solo Stove fire pit. Otherwise, our products should be stored in a cool, dry location.

YES, you should use a Stand on:
  • Wooden Deck. Untreated wood ignites at 356° F. …
  • Composite and PVC Decking. Composite decking, such as Trex, TimberTech, Azek, TIVA, Nexan, and Versadeck, have a manufacturer fire resistance rating from A to C. …
  • Green Grass. …
  • Sand. …
  • Concrete or Pavement. …
  • Stone, Pavers, or Gravel. …
  • Dirt.

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The Truth about the Solo Stove Bonfire - (And why I wouldn't buy it again)
The Truth about the Solo Stove Bonfire – (And why I wouldn’t buy it again)

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  • Author: SoCal Expeditions
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  • Date Published: Aug 2, 2021
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Is it safe to use a Solo Stove on a deck?

A solo stove should not be placed directly on a wood deck, as this can cause damage over time. Instead, a solo stove should have a stand and preferably a fireproof mat underneath it. There are benefits to using both, but the solo stand is an absolute necessity.

Can you keep Solo Stove outside?

Solo Stove fire pits can be stored outside with an appropriate weather cover. Check out Solo Stove Shelter, an outdoor weather cover designed specifically for use with a Solo Stove fire pit. Otherwise, our products should be stored in a cool, dry location.

Can I use fire pit on balcony?

As a rule, a balcony fire pit would be safest on concrete or stone balconies. You should avoid fire pits on wood balconies for obvious reasons. Also, keep any combustible furniture away from the fire pit.

What surfaces can you put a Solo Stove on?

YES, you should use a Stand on:
  • Wooden Deck. Untreated wood ignites at 356° F. …
  • Composite and PVC Decking. Composite decking, such as Trex, TimberTech, Azek, TIVA, Nexan, and Versadeck, have a manufacturer fire resistance rating from A to C. …
  • Green Grass. …
  • Sand. …
  • Concrete or Pavement. …
  • Stone, Pavers, or Gravel. …
  • Dirt.

Can you put a Solo Stove on an outdoor rug?

Look below – The best place for a fire pit is on aggregate, like gravel or concrete. Avoid placing a fire pit on mulch, artificial turf, or an outdoor rug. Solo Stoves are an exception– they can be safely placed on a deck with a stand.

What if Solo Stove gets wet?

A little moisture on the outside of your fire pit is okay as long as you dry it off with a towel. However, moisture can damage the grate and ashpan inside your fire pit. We recommend using Shelter with your fire pit to keep it safe from the elements.

Can you use a smokeless fire pit under covered patio?

Fire pits should never be used in an enclosed space. If not properly ventilated, a fire pit will cause a buildup of toxic smoke and harmful gases, like carbon monoxide. Always use a fire pit in an open space with plenty of air flow.

Can you use a smokeless fire pit on a covered patio?

Although the gas fire feature is controlled, it still radiates heat, and heat rises. If there is not enough clearance above the fire pit, the patio cover can overheat, melt, and possibly catch on fire. No matter where you decide to place your fire feature, ensure that it doesn’t block an overhead clearance.

Can you use Solo Stove on covered porch?

If you want to use your Solo Stove outdoors on a rainy day, put it as close to the edge of the covered patio or porch as you can. If you have the space and budget, a purpose-built pergola, open on all sides and with a high roof, makes a safer outdoor space for your fire pit.

Can you have a propane fire pit on an apartment balcony?

The Fire Prevention Act says that propane or charcoal barbecues aren’t allowed on apartment balconies with an overhang and should be at least 10 feet out from the building.

What fire pits are safe for decks?

Propane fire pits (or natural gas) offer open flame without the risk of floating embers, hot ash, and irritating smoke. The heat doesn’t radiate downward like a wood fire, so it is also less of a risk to wooden decks too. They are available in hundreds of styles and looks from stone, timber, sculpted metal to glass.

Can you put fire pit on deck?

Never, never, NEVER place a fire put directly on a wooden or composite deck. Potential expensive issues due to the use of a fire pit on a wood deck range from full-on fire damage and the destruction or weakening of the decking and the supporting structure, to cosmetic damage from scorching.

Do you have to have the stand for Solo Stove?

Went together very easy and is very strong would recommend this to anybody who has a Solo stove! The stand obviously isn’t necessary, but it does the job you want it to do. The best feature of the Bonfire is the ability to take it anywhere easily. The stand elevates it to provide a heat barrier for use on any surface.

Can you put fire pit on deck?

Never, never, NEVER place a fire put directly on a wooden or composite deck. Potential expensive issues due to the use of a fire pit on a wood deck range from full-on fire damage and the destruction or weakening of the decking and the supporting structure, to cosmetic damage from scorching.

How far should a Solo Stove be from a house?

Keep your fire pit at least six feet away from buildings while in use. Keep 15-20 feet above your fire pit clear of obstructions, such as tree branches and patio overhangs.

Can I use Solo Stove on composite deck?

A solo stove can be used on a composite deck as long as there is a stand for it to sit on creating an air space between the decking and fire. Including a fireproof mat will increase the protection of the composite decking from any heat radiating from the bottom of the stove.

Do Solo stoves get hot on the bottom?

Yes! Unlike a regular fire pit, the bottom of the stove never gets hotter than 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Are Solo Stoves Safe On a Deck? (What You Should Know)

There’s nothing better than sitting around a fire pit in your yard, toasting marshmallows over the flames. Solo Stoves are especially great for this as they’re virtually smokeless and get less hot than other models – but are they ok to use on your decking?

Solo Stoves are safe to use on both wood or Trex decking, provided you also use the Solo Stove stand or a heat-resistant fire pit barrier underneath. Although Solo Stoves emit less heat than other types of fire pits, they could still damage your deck over prolonged periods of use.

Let’s look in more detail at why Solo Stoves are fine on both wood and Trex decks, how they direct heat – and why you should use that stand we mentioned or a fire pit barrier. We’ll also consider just how hot these stoves get on the outside, and if they’re ok to use on a covered deck, porch or patio.

Check out the latest prices for Solo Stoves at Amazon.com…

Can You Use a Solo Stove On a Wooden Deck?

Yes, you can use your Solo Stove on your wooden deck. That’s great news, because there’s nothing cosier on a cool evening than sitting round your fire pit together, swapping stories and drinking something warming. But – we’re still talking about a mix of fire and wood here, so there are several precautions you have to take.

Firstly, choose wisely. Don’t go for a pit that stands directly on the deck and doesn’t have a stand option. Go for a model that’s compatible with a stand; and we’ll look at Solo Stove stands in a moment, as this can be a straightforward solution. There’s also the option of placing a heat-resistant barrier on the deck (again, we’ll cover this in more depth later).

The main thing to think about is heat direction. If the heat radiates downwards, it’s going to heat your deck. With some fire pits reaching temperatures of 1000oF, you really, really don’t want that level of heat hitting the deck.In order for heat to dissipate between the fire and the surface, there needs to be distance between them.

Another thing to bear in mind is sparking. A real fire can hiss, spit and send out sparks, and you don’t want these damaging your deck. There’s also a risk of red-hot embers shifting out of the pit if it’s disturbed. You can guard against this with a larger barrier, and always burn good quality hardwood which is less likely to spark.

Solo Stoves are an excellent option, as they are cooler than many models, and don’t produce as much smoke or sparks.

Is it OK To Use a Solo Stove On a Trex Deck?

Trex is a type of composite decking, along with types like Azek, Nexan, and Versadeck. All these brands have manufacturer’s fire resistance gradings. These are rated from A to C, with A being the most fire-resistant. Check with the installation manual, your builder or the manufacturer to find one which rating your composite or PVC decking has.

However, with those 1000oF temperatures potentially reaching your Trex decking, we’d definitely recommend using a stand for your fire pit. This will raise it the required distance from the deck, and you could always add a surface barrier. As with a wooden deck, never use a fire pit that sits directly on the floor.

If you are really worried about the surface of your deck, whether it’s composite or wood, go for an alternative fuel source such as a gas-powered fire. We know it’s not the same, but there are some great gas-powered options out there.

Of course, if you want both wooden decking and a real fire pit, another option is to site it just off your deck. Surfaces you don’t have to worry about include concrete, most pavers, gravel, stone and dirt. Grass can actually get scorched, so think twice before sticking your fire pit straight onto the lawn.

Check out the latest prices for Solo Stoves at Amazon.com…

Should I Use The Solo Stove Stand?

The short answer is yes. These are great, and we wouldn’t light our Solo Stove without first popping it on its neat stand. The stands are smart rings that are made from the same material as the stoves, 304 stainless steel. They have holes designed to radiate residual heat.

Because the Solo Stove stand is designed to fit the fire pit, there’s no risk of it wobbling or feeling precarious. Plus, when you want to put the stove away, the stand stores away tidily inside it.

If you’re using the Solo Stove on your deck, the stand is an essential. We’d also recommend using one on grass (you’ll regret not doing this if you end up with a scorched circle on the lawn) and on sand, if you’re taking your fire pit to the beach. Yes we know sand won’t catch fire, but it can and does obstruct the air vents at the bottom of the stove, so the stand adds a bit of height to prevent this.

If your patio is made from stone or concrete pavers, you should be fine without a stand. However, if you’ve stained or painted your pavers, you’ll need to use a stand.

Do I Need a Heat Resistant Fire Pit Barrier For a Solo Stove On a Deck?

If you’re using a Solo Stove stand, this should provide sufficient distance between the fire pit and the surface. However, if you want to be extra safe, you can stand it on a heat-resistant barrier.

You can get these tough barriers on Amazon: Newtex makes a round one that looks smart under a Solo Stove fire pit. Deckprotect makes aluminum thermal barriers in a range of sizes. Just make sure any barrier is larger than your fire pit to prevent the base or legs from wobbling.

How Is Solo Stove Heat Directed?

Solo Stoves create less downwards heat than many other types of fire pit. The reason behind this is their airflow. Air is sucked in through the vent holes at the base, which is pulled upwards by the flames. A lot of the heat is directed upwards, away from your deck.

If you’re after radiant heat, this might concern you: is all the heat lost upwards? No, it isn’t. This design doesn’t radiate as much heat as some; however you’ll still get plenty of warmth from its cozy flames.

Does The Solo Stove Get Hot On The Outside?

Yes, it does: it’s a metal box with a fire in it. It doesn’t get as hot as some other fire pit burners, because of the way it draws cool air in from the bottom, and its insulated design also prevents it from becoming red hot. But, you’ll still need to take care around kids and pets.

Solo Stoves themselves recommend not touching any part of the fire pit until it’s cooled down. Because it burns rapidly, the stove also cools quickly. That’s definitely a plus when it comes to fire safety.

One really good thing about the Solo Stove fire pit is that it produces less smoke than other designs, which makes it a more pleasant, less eye-watering experience for children. Because of this, there are fewer sparks, too, although you might still want to guard against this. You can get fire pit spark screens made from tough mesh, which prevent those little sparks from flying up when there are kids around.

If you are really concerned, you can use a fire guard the same as you would with your indoor wood-burning stove. Of course, you can simply keep the fire pit as a nighttime treat for grownups and older kids, when the toddlers are tucked up safely in their beds…

Do Solo Stoves Get Hot on the Bottom?

Yes, your Solo Stove will heat up on the base, which is why it’s essential to use the stand. As we mentioned earlier, these tough 304 stainless steel stands provide distance between your stove base and the deck, and are designed to radiate heat.

You can also add a heatproof mat to your deck, which gives further protection from heat radiating downwards.

How Long Does It Take for a Solo Stove to Cool?

Generally, it takes about 40 minutes for a Solo Stove to cool down, although we’d say, better allow an hour just to be sure. Keep the fire guard up during this time if you have kids or pets in the vicinity.

Can The Solo Stove Be Used On a Covered Deck, Porch or Patio?

This is a real area for debate. It’s a small, compact stove that doesn’t belch out smoke and sparks like some fire pits, and the fire is neatly contained. So, you can light it under a canopy, right?

All stoves need good ventilation to prevent a build-up of carbon monoxide – and none of us wants that. Every year, we read about campers getting poisoned from using their BBQ inside their tent or awning.

A covered deck or patio, or a porch with a roof, has much better airflow than an indoor room; however, it’s still not as good as the great outdoors. A patio or porch that’s open on three sides has a reasonable airflow, as does a gazebo if you open all the sides.

If you want to use your Solo Stove outdoors on a rainy day, put it as close to the edge of the covered patio or porch as you can. If you have the space and budget, a purpose-built pergola, open on all sides and with a high roof, makes a safer outdoor space for your fire pit.

Want to heat a partially covered space most evenings? An electric patio heater is a safer option, with the fire pit kept for outdoor use. There’s another option if you love a real fire but feel that your porch is too enclosed: install a proper fireplace, with a real flue.

We can’t really recommend using a fire box under cover because of the CO risks. There are plenty of dry days and evenings to enjoy your Solo Stove in the great outdoors, safely on your deck or in your yard.

How Far Should a Solo Stove Bonfire Be From a House?

Your Solo Stove needs to be at least six feet away from your house or any other buildings, when it’s in use. Remember to also leave 15-10 feet clear above the stove, so watch out for patio overhangs and tree branches.

Can You Leave a Solo Stove Outside? (What Happens if They Get Wet in the Rain?)

You can keep your Solo Stove outside; however, it’s a good idea to invest in a cover, as prolonged exposure to rain and damp conditions can lead to rust and discoloration. Solo makes covers that are designed to fit snugly and securely onto their stoves.

Of course, if you have a convenient storage place for your stove (such as your shed), it’s best to winterize it indoors. Even so, it’s still helpful to have a set of covers so you don’t have to keep carrying it in and out of storage. If your stove does get wet, make sure it’s thoroughly dry before using it or storing it undercover.

What Wood Burns Best in a Solo Stove?

The best wood (as recommended by Solo) is a dry hardwood. Birch, maple, hickory, and oak are good choices. Wherever you can, opt for hardwood over softwood, as you’ll get a longer and cleaner burn.

Can I Use Duraflame Logs in a Solo Stove?

You can use Duraflame logs in your stove; however, they’re still not as good as a dry hardwood like maple or oak.

Can You Burn Pine in a Solo Stove?

Pine needles and pine cones are great ways to start a fire, so use these as kindling. However, the needles can get a bit smokey, so once the fire has started, switch to something else.

If you like that distinctive resinous smell, you can burn cedar wood on a stove (it’s one of the only softwoods that Solo suggests using).

Can I Burn a Christmas Tree in a Solo Stove?

This isn’t the best way to dispose of your Christmas tree after the holidays. Your old tree will create sparks, smoke, and potentially toxic fumes from the terpenes in the needles.

Despite having been cut for a few weeks, the tree still won’t be as dry as properly seasoned wood is, so you’ll get that nasty damp burn. As well as being unpleasant, this can cause a build-up of creosote, which isn’t good for the stove itself.

Can You Burn Leaves in a Solo Stove?

The Solo Stove isn’t designed to be a garden waste disposal. Yes, you technically could get rid of a few (very) dry leaves, but it’s an inefficient way to manage garden waste.

Instead, aim to compost or mulch as much of your yard waste as possible, and failing that, have a proper bonfire.

Can You Put Charcoal in a Solo Stove?

Opinion is divided on this one. Generally speaking, don’t use charcoal on a burner that’s designed for wood, and the stove is more for heat and the odd smore than something to cook on. Solo does make a grill…

Can You Use Starter Logs in a Solo Stove?

Yes, you can use starter logs in your stove, and indeed, Solo makes and sells their own starters, created from recycled hardwood.

Starters are a great invention, much easier and cleaner than messing about with old newspaper sheets.

Can You Use Lighter Fluid in a Solo Stove?

Don’t use any form of lighter fluid in your Solo Stove, either to start it off or keep it going. It’s so easy to light a stove with starters and dry wood, that there really is no need for it, anyway.

How Do You Dispose of Ashes From a Solo Stove?

It’s easy to get the ashes out of a Solo Stove, as this short film shows. Wait until it’s cool (allow up to an hour), tip the ashes out, wipe the inside of the stove, dry, then store.

But what do you do with the ashes? Wood ash is a great source of potassium for your garden. Sprinkle the cool ash onto your beds or even across the lawn, as the grass will love it.

Do Solo Stoves Give Off Sparks & Embers?

One of the reasons why Solo Stoves have become such a popular stove brand is the lack of sparks and embers.

While we can’t guarantee that there’ll be zero sparks, there’s fewer than you get with other types of real wood fire pits. This is why Solo Stoves are a good option for family use, as there’s a reduced risk of sparks flying out and causing injury – especially if you use the stove with a stove shield.

Is the Solo Stove Shield Worth It?

If you have kids, pets, or a wooden deck, the Solo Stove Shield is an excellent idea. It’s designed to further reduce the emission of sparks and embers.

The shield simply fits over the stove, and can easily be removed, using the heavy-duty stainless steel sticks, to add more logs. There are even grooves to rest your roasting sticks.

The Solo Stove Shield is available on Amazon, so we checked out the reviews. It scores 4.8 stars out of a possible 5, based on over 700 customer ratings. So, we reckon that Solo Stove customers definitely think it’s worth it!

Customers say it does the job well, is easy to work with, and is made from quality materials. However, at a cost of around $160, it does add significantly to the cost of your stove set up.

Conclusion

Ultimately, it’s fine to use your Solo Stove on either a wood or Trex deck if you have the special stand underneath it or use a fire pit barrier.

Solo Stoves give off far less smoke and heat than other types of fire pits, and although they still do get hot on the outside, they are safer in general on decking than other models which direct more heat downwards onto the deck and also release more sparks.

And the best thing of all? You can toast marshmallows to perfection on your Solo Stove as well. 🙂

Check out the latest prices for Solo Stoves at Amazon.com…

Can You Put a Solo Stove On A Wood Deck?

A solo stove is a great fire pit for your backyard. All the fun of a fire pit without all the hassle of smoke everywhere. If you have a deck, you may be wondering if you can use the solo stove on your deck.

It is safe to use a solo stove on a wood deck, as long as you use the solo stove stand. Adding a fire proof mat would add an extra layer of security.

Do not use the solo stove directly on a wood deck without the solo stove stand as the heat could damage the deck.

Should I Use a Stand or a Fire Pit Mat?

A solo stove should not be placed directly on a wood deck, as this can cause damage over time. Instead, a solo stove should have a stand and preferably a fireproof mat underneath it. There are benefits to using both, but the solo stand is an absolute necessity.

A solo stove comes with its own stand that you can set the firepit on. The solo stove stand is made of 304 stainless steel and has holes designed to radiate residual heat from the fire pit. This means the heat that the solo stove radiates will go into the stand, rather than the wooden deck. It will prevent any damage from being caused, such as scorch marks or damage to any paint or stains.

You can also use a heat resistant fireproof mat with the solo stove and stand. If you’re an extra cautious person, you could also put 4 12″ concrete pavers on your deck then use the solo stove and stand on top. However, using the stove stand is required, as this is the most effective way to stay safe and keep your deck from being damaged.

How Far Should The Stove Be From My House?

The recommended amount of distance the solo stove should be from your house is six feet. This is an adequate amount of distance to prevent the flames from catching on something and causing a house fire.

Solo stoves use open flames in order to heat up, and these flames can cause accidents easily if you’re not careful. The flames can be picked up by strong winds, and then catch onto something flammable like a lawn chair or outdoor umbrella. Because of this, it’s recommended to keep the stove at least six feet away from your house, but also six feet away from anything flammable.

While a wooden deck is flammable, the stand and a fireproof mat will do an adequate job of preventing the flames from catching on the deck. As long as the stove isn’t near anything else flammable, then you’ll be good to go.

Can I Use a Solo Stove on Other Types of Decks?

You can use a solo stove on other types of decks, such as hardwood decks and composite decks. You will have to take the same safety precautions as a wooden deck, but the stoves are safe to use as long as you follow those safety rules.

While wooden decks are the more common type of deck, trex and composite decks are popular as well. While a solo stove can also be used on those types of decks, the same safety precautions must be taken. You also may need to take some extra precautions in order to ensure the safety of yourself and others around you, including your outdoor items.

Using a Solo Stove on a Composite Deck

A composite deck is made of a composite material of wood fibers and plastic film. It is safe to use a solo stove on a composite deck, as long as you use a stand and a fireproof mat.

The two main things that are required to use a solo stove safely on a composite deck are a solo stove stand and a fireproof mat. The solo stand will create an adequate amount of airspace between the deck and the solo stove, preventing any possible damage.

A fireproof mat placed under the stand will increase the amount of protection, and protect the deck from any heat that’s radiating from the bottom of the stove. If you’re looking to upgrade your deck to composite, here’s the best composite decking.

Using a Solo Stove on a Hardwood Deck

A hardwood deck is made from ipe, cumaru, garapa etc. You can also use a solo stove on a hardwood deck. Hardwood decks are naturally dense which have a higher fire rating than most other woods. Ipe has a Class A Fire Rating and is the most heat resistant decking on the market.

A hardwood deck is able to handle more heat than a regular wood deck and even some composites. With an Ipe deck, only the solo stove stand is necessary.

Final Thoughts

The solo stove is a great smoke-free fire pit, but should only be used with their solo stand on a wood deck. We have the Yukon model and use it on our pressure treated stained deck all the time without any issues. We actually bought the yukon bundle that had the stand and shield included to reduce heat and sparks on our deck on a black friday sale.

I can’t say enough good things about Solo stove fire pits and hope we’ve answered your question about using it on your wood deck.

Balcony Fire Pit Guide: Everything You Need to Know

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Having a balcony fire pit is a good idea on the surface but requires careful consideration to use safely. Unlike other outdoor features, you’re dealing with open flames, so it’s vital to plan things properly.

So, if you’ve been thinking about getting a fire pit for your apartment balcony, condo or house, you’re in the right place. This guide will cover everything you need to know to get started.

Why Get a Balcony Fire Pit?

A fire pit is more than just a way to keep warm, although that’s the main reason to get one. They’re great if you plan to host outdoor gatherings and are ideal as a central feature in a social space.

You generally can’t (or shouldn’t) cook food on a fire pit because it can cause damage and clog the pit up with food and fat. That said, s’mores will work just fine!

Considerations Before Buying a Fire Pit for an Apartment Balcony

Along with the usual practical considerations, there are a few things specific to fire pits that you must check before buying. These include:

Fire Safety Laws

Your HOA or rental agreement might have rules about fire pits on balconies. Regardless, there are usually state laws concerning the use of open flames in outdoor spaces.

A popular one in the US (and elsewhere in the world) is the International Fire Code. Its rules are used in 42 US states, and there are slight variations in the remaining 8.

The 2 most important rules are:

No fire pits within 10 feet of a combustible structure (e.g. something made of wood) unless your balcony is attached to a 1 or 2 family dwelling.

Your balcony must have a sprinkler system.

You’ll also find rules about LPG tanks, which are a common fuel source for fire pits.

In short, check the regulations before you go out and buy a balcony fire pit.

Size and Type

There are several types of fire pit, some of which are more suitable for balconies than others. Similarly, there are different fuel sources, including gas and hard fuel. We’ll cover the most relevant types below.

Why is this important? Well, you should choose a type that has readily available fuel. If you live rurally, firewood might not be a problem. But if you’re in a city, LPG might make more sense.

Budget

Fire pits can get pretty expensive when you start looking at bigger models. If you want a small fire pit for your balcony, it’ll cost slightly less.

Of course, you should only really invest in a fire pit if you’re going to use it. They might look nice, but an unused fire pit isn’t exactly the nicest balcony decoration.

Is it Safe to Have a Fire Pit on a Balcony?

Providing you’re careful about your setup, it can be perfectly safe to have a fire pit on a balcony. You should check it’s allowed in your local regulations, and you should ensure you always have a fire extinguisher on hand.

As a rule, a balcony fire pit would be safest on concrete or stone balconies. You should avoid fire pits on wood balconies for obvious reasons.

Also, keep any combustible furniture away from the fire pit. This includes:

Wood furniture

Wicker or bamboo

Soft furnishings

Plastic (it’ll melt rather than burn)

If completely removing furniture isn’t an option, keep it a few feet away from the fire pit. LPG fires don’t spit and crackle like solid fuels, so these are generally safer options in more compact spaces.

Best Types of Balcony Fire Pit

Below are some examples of the best fire pits for use on balconies. Of course, this isn’t an exhaustive list but is meant to give you some inspiration about the most suitable styles and sizes for balconies.

1. Outland Living Firebowl

This portable fire pit is designed for camping or transporting in an RV, but this means it’ll be ideal as a mini fire pit for a balcony. It has a diameter of 19 inches and is 11 inches tall. Granted, building regulations will still apply, but its small size means it’s much easier to use on a balcony.

It runs on propane gas (LPG), a much cleaner fuel source than wood or charcoal. You get a gas hose with the fire pit, but obviously you need to buy your own gas tank.

The only real downside is that it’s quite expensive for its size. That said, it produces quite an intense flame, so is overall a good choice for small balconies that can’t fit a normal size fire pit.

Pros

Good size flame.

Uses LPG.

Compact – ideal as a mini fire pit for a balcony.

Cons

Quite expensive.

2. Pop-Up Fire Pit

If you want a more budget-friendly model, this could be the fire pit for you. However, you do sacrifice nicer design features for the sake of an inexpensive model.

This balcony fire pit is essentially a metal box on legs. It uses wood or charcoal, so doesn’t burn as clean as LPG. But, the elevated design does meet various fire safety regulations. Better still, the legs collapse, making it a great portable fire pit.

But, if you plan to use it on a balcony, you’ll need to invest in some extra products. It has a mesh grille on the bottom, meaning embers and soot can fall through. To stop this from being a problem, you’ll need an ember guard, which is sold separately.

Pros

Pop-up design.

Entry-level price.

Cons

Uses wood.

Needs extra products to work properly.

3. Sunnydaze Outdoor Fire Pit

This fire pit is a standard design that’s mostly enclosed. As such, you can use it to cook food because it’s great at retaining heat. It also means it’ll be great as a balcony heater.

It’s 21 inches tall and has a 29.5 inch diameter, so is on the bigger side. There’s a spark screen included, meaning you won’t have to worry about singing furniture (or yourself).

Despite its size, it’s a very reasonable price. The only real downside is that it uses wood or charcoal as fuel. While this is great for cooking food, it’s difficult to use in more urban areas.

Pros

Larger balcony fire pit.

Great at retaining heat.

Reasonable price for size and features.

Cons

Uses wood or charcoal.

4. Bali Outdoors Propane Fire Pit

If fuel source is a concern, propane is the best way to go. It’s cleaner and easier to handle, providing there aren’t many restrictions on storing LPG canisters. This large fire pit is propane-fuelled and would look great on modern balconies.

It’s 25 inches tall and 28 inches wide, so it’s on the larger side. However, its flame is relatively small. As such, it’s less about providing heat and more about atmosphere. The smaller flame might be beneficial in some circumstances, though.

Overall, there’s very little negative to say about this fire pit. It’d look great on a balcony and its low heat output means it should be allowed under most fire safety regulations

Pros

LPG fuel.

Smaller flame could suit balconies.

Has storage space.

Cons

Flame is more about look than heat.

5. Tabletop Fire Pit

For those on a strict budget who want atmosphere more than anything else, this portable fire pit could be the right option. It’s ideal as a mini fire pit for a balcony because it’s only 6.5 inches tall.

As such, if fire regulations are strict in your area, you could set this mini fire pit up. It’s essentially a candle without the wax, so is the best of both worlds. It uses isopropyl alcohol as its fuel source, which you get as gel canisters.

Despite being so small, it gets hot enough to cook s’mores. The only difficulty is trying to put the flame out. To do so, you’ll need to use a metal pan or something, as there’s no way to turn it off.

Pros

Great mini fire pit for a balcony.

Should fly under fire safety regulations because it’s not much more than a candle.

Still hot enough to cook s’mores.

Cons

Can be difficult to put out.

6. Fire Pit with Water Feature

This is less about a specific product and more about an interesting range of items. A fire pit with a water feature could look great on a balcony or decking, providing you have the infrastructure, of course.

Fire pit fountains can get pretty expensive, and you’ll obviously need to run a water pump. Some are self-contained while others feed into a stream or pond. If this sounds like something you want, make sure you shop around for the most suitable model.

The main problem is the price. A fire pit with a water feature can be very expensive because of all the parts it needs. However, if your budget stretches, it’ll look great.

Conclusion

Choosing a fire pit for a balcony can be challenging, particularly due to building regulations. But, if you’re confident you’re allowed one, a small fire pit for a balcony is a great way to add atmosphere.

Can you use a fire pit on your balcony?

The short answer is yes you can, although you may want to check with your HOA or rental agreement, along with local ordinances. With any sort of fire, you will want to follow some of the safety tips and preparatory tasks listed below.

Areas that have a drought season will implement burn bans, which do not allow the use of open, wood-burning fires. Even when used on an apartment or condo balcony, embers can be carried by the wind to drier areas where a fire can start.

Each contract or agreement varies greatly depending on the neighborhood and geographical location. Areas in the western part of the United States that do not see much rain are often stricter than states sitting on the East coast.

To find out whether or not your county is under a burn ban, you can usually Google “[State] + burn ban” or by “[County] [State] + burn ban.” For example, Indiana has a map that is regularly updated to show which counties are or aren’t under a burn ban.

Some states, like Arizona, have different stages of restrictions. Be sure to verify that your area is not under any restrictions and you are free to do so in accordance with your HOA or rental contract.

Know your position and the direction of the smoke

While it may be legal, per se, that doesn’t mean it’ll be desired by your neighbors. Handle it how you will, but it’s a good idea to know which direction the smoke will be blowing and to check with your neighbors to know if they’ll be out on their balcony for the evening.

Some balconies may be stacked right on top of each other, so know whether you have enough space to safely use a fire pit. Excessive heat over time can weaken the strength of your balcony or the ones around yours.The LandscapingNetwork cites that around 7 feet of space in all directions of the fire pit is a good rule of thumb.

Burn only clean, dry hardwoods

At the minimum, you should be burning clean, dry, barkless, hardwoods. Kiln-dried wood is preferred if you have access to it. Any softwoods will create more smoke due to their higher sap content. The soot that is created from this sap can leave a tar-like residue on surrounding structures.

Hardwoods are preferred for burning hotter, longer, and cleaner. Remove the bark if you can, since that’ll help to cut down on any soot that may be created.

Kiln-dried wood is more expensive, but it typically burns the cleanest and you can store it indoors. As the name implies, it is dried in a kiln, aka a giant oven. Any molds, funguses, insects, or anything else you wouldn’t want near your apartment are killed off before it even makes it to the store.

Consider a gas fire pit

If a wood-burning fire pit is not allowed on your condo or apartment balcony, check to see if a gas grill is. If you can use a propane-powered grill, then you can usually use a gas-powered fire pit, since it is categorized as an appliance, not a fire pit.

Follow normal safety considerations

Keep any flammable sources at least 7 feet away from the fire

Keep a fire extinguisher and bucket of water close by

Make use of a spark shield or ember mat to keep the fire contained

The National Fire Protection Association and ReadyWV offer some additional safety tips.

5 Places You Can NOT Use Your Solo Stove (Explained) – Houshia

Solo Stoves are fantastic pieces of kit and one of the best things about them is that they’re designed to go pretty much anywhere. They are light and portable, and you can easily stow one in your vehicle for camping weekends or longer trips. They’re also great in the backyard.

That said, however, there are places where Solo Stoves can’t be used, and we’re going to look into what those are today so you don’t get caught out. Most of these are to do with safety, so it’s really important to understand them before you go setting your stove up.

Remember that Solo Stoves are considered open flames, so it’s crucial to behave responsibly and treat them with respect. They are much more dangerous than the stove in your kitchen, and can easily cause injuries or even fatalities if they aren’t handled with care.

Always err on the side of caution and think about the conditions you’re lighting your stove in. If there’s a breeze, be more careful. If there’s a strong wind, don’t light the fire at all. If you aren’t sure the situation is safe, opt not to risk it.

It’s also a good idea to have access to some water for emergencies, but don’t use this as an excuse to behave irresponsibly.

Solo Stoves Are For Outdoor Use Only

Indoor spaces are the a major “no” when it comes to places where you should never be using a Solo Stove. It might seem like a great idea if you love your Solo Stove and you have hard flooring in your kitchen – why shouldn’t you just haul it in there and whip up some marshmallows or a quick dinner?

Quite simply, Solo Stoves are not designed to be used inside, and present serious risks if they are. Even if you purchase a stand which raises the Solo Stove up off the floor, you should not use them inside. Solo Stoves are considered open flames, and are definitely not safe for indoor use. They could easily set fire to the house.

This rule applies to all kinds of buildings; Solo Stoves are not to be used in garages, sheds, or any enclosed areas. Even if the building is not flammable, there are big issues.

For example, the fumes from the stove can accumulate and pose very serious health risks or even cause fatalities. You should only use these stoves – and others like them – in open areas where there is good ventilation.

Solo Stoves Shouldn’t Be Set Up On Flammable Surfaces

It’s really important to check what your Solo Stove is standing on, especially if you’re camping or in areas with lots of potential fuel. Remember how hot the stove is going to get, and think about what it’s in contact with.

If you’re camping or lighting your stove out in nature, make sure you clear the space where you’re going to stand your stove, and the nearby area. Solo Stove recommends getting rid of all nearby flammable materials, and stresses that anything highly flammable, such as gasoline, should not be stored anywhere near the stove.

You should think about how far a fire could potentially spread if the Solo Stove accidentally got overturned, and use this as a guide for how much you need to clear. Take into account how dry the ground and surrounding area is as well; wet ground doesn’t present such a big risk, but dry ground can catch fire very easily.

Err on the side of caution and move more material than you need to, maximizing the safety.

If you’re camping in an area with grass, moss, leaves, etc., consider building a couple of rings of stones around your stove. Clear away flammable material within the rings.

These stones will help you to ensure you have a good circle of safety around the stove, and will also serve as fire breaks if you do get sparks or anything else which could cause a fire.

“Practice good habits and always ensure the vicinity is clear of flammable and highly flammable materials before you light up your Solo Stove.“

Solo Stoves Should Be Kept Away From Buildings

Just as you don’t want your Solo Stove near flammable materials, you also don’t want it anywhere near buildings. Remember that if the wind picks up, flames could spread. You shouldn’t light a fire when it’s windy, but it’s still best to consider the possible effect wind could have if it began.

Solo Stove recommends that you make sure the stove is at least six feet away from the nearest building. Don’t be tempted to cheat on this; you don’t want a building going up in smoke under any circumstances. Measure six feet and always set up with room to spare. This will keep everyone safe.

Buildings include sheds and small structures as well as houses or garages. Many sheds are wood and will burn readily, so it’s important to include them in your calculations, and leave plenty of space. You should also consider any other garden structures such as compost bins, chicken houses, guinea pig hutches, raised beds, etc.

Vehicles come under this list too, which is particularly important to remember when you’re traveling. Because of the amount of heat stoves can give off, it’s important to keep them well away from vehicles and their fuel sources to prevent any potential accidents.

Solo Stoves Don’t Belong Beneath Low Overhangs

It’s easy to underestimate just how much heat rises, or how high flames can get once a fire is really underway. If you’re very focused on checking the immediate surroundings for potential problems, you might forget to look up – don’t.

Always check above your Solo Stove site just as carefully as you would check the vicinity and the base you’re setting it on. Think about which way the wind might blow the flames, and how big the fire is going to be. As always, it’s better to be safe than sorry, so be extra cautious.

Solo Stove recommends leaving up to 20 feet between the stove and any overhanging structure. This includes low branches, awnings, or patio overhangs. The fire will produce a lot of heat, and even if it doesn’t actually set fire to the overhang, it could cause a lot of damage to it.

Remember too that an overhanging structure will prevent the stove from ventilating as effectively, and could trap fumes down around the stove. If you’re sitting nearby, this is dangerous. It’s much better to let the fire’s output dissipate freely into the sky, without the interference of overhanging structures.

Don’t Use A Solo Stove On A Boat

It might seem like none of the above “can’t” rules apply to a boat; after all, a boat is in the open air, it has no overhangs, it’s outdoors, it isn’t very flammable, and it’s not a building in the usual sense of the word.

However, you definitely should not use a Solo Stove on a boat. Though the idea of toasting marshmallows or hot dogs over a fire while you cruise down the river might seem very appealing, this simply isn’t safe.

You may have a lot of water to hand to douse an accidental fire before it could get out of control, but you still should not use a Solo Stove on a boat. There are lots of reasons for this.

One is that the rocking of the boat could very easily knock the Solo Stove over, which would result in burning wood being spilled everywhere.

The Solo Stove is also likely to damage the surface of the boat; your deck might not be flammable, but it probably isn’t designed to be fireproof or heatproof either. Using your Solo Stove – even on a stand – could result in damage to the deck.

Combining the dangers of open fires with the dangers of sailing is not a good idea; if you want to cook on or heat your boat, look into stoves which are specifically designed for it, and follow their safety instructions.

This rule is true for all other recreational vehicles too; Solo Stoves should not be used on or in them. That includes the back of pick-up trucks or trailers; these are not suitable spaces for setting up your stove, and trying to use it there could be dangerous.

Conclusion

There are plenty of great spaces where you can use these highly versatile and useful pieces of kit, but there are also some places where you absolutely should not set your Solo Stove up. Doing so could risk your life and the lives of others, and if you’re in an area with lots of flammable material, could potentially start serious wild fires.

“It’s crucial to practice responsibility and caution when using any open flames, so make sure you follow the manufacturer’s guidelines. Always consider the space you’re going to be using. Include what the Solo Stove will sit on, what it’s surrounded by, and what’s above it.“

Following these steps and erring on the side of caution will keep you and everybody else safe!

Alright, that’s it for this article guys, if you found it useful then a share on social media or your website would be cool!

All the best

Steve

ps here’s a few articles related to this one you might find interesting:

5 Places People Use Solo Stove Firepits (Safely)

How do Solo Stoves Work? (Explained For Beginners)

7 Smokeless Fire Pit Fuels That Actually WORK!

Heating a Garage with a Wood Stove/Burner-(A Beginners Guide)

Can You Use Solo Stove Under Covered Patio?

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Can You Have a Balcony Fire Pit?

When looking into buying a fire pit it’s not uncommon for buyers to take a minute to think about where they’re going to use it and if it’s legal, safe or even smart to do so.

Can I use a fire pit on grass, or a wood deck, under a tree, or under a pergola, etc.?

These are the common sense questions people ask when narrowing down their fire pit choices.

Another one I’ve seen quite a bit lately is “can you have a balcony fire pit?”

This isn’t surprising considering how many people live in apartment buildings or condos and the growth in popularity of fire pits in recent years.

With this growth though, bad things are going to happen. Naturally, state and local governments, homeowners associations, property management companies, and others step in (rightfully so) to tighten and enforce rules and regulations to keep people from getting hurt and to protect property. Let’s find out if you can, in fact, use a fire pit on a balcony and if it’s the right thing to do for you considering your situation.

Yes, a fire pit can be used safely and legally on a balcony. However, it is advised that prior to setting up a fire pit on a balcony, state and local laws, homeowner’s association covenants, rental agreements/apartment building rules, etc. are consulted and adhered to. Doing so will keep you in compliance and mitigate the risk of potential fines, expensive property damage, or worse. Further, when shopping for a fire pit your options may be limited by certain structural restrictions specific to your residence such as balcony floor space and the amount of overhead clearance.

Making sure you do your homework ahead of time prior to buying a fire pit and thinking about where it’s going to go will save you a lot of time, frustration and money potentially.

Navigating state and local law, and residential covenants and rules now rather than later will save you that trouble.

Can I have a balcony fire pit?

Running Afoul of the Law, the HOA, or Apartment/Condo Management

When buying any fire pit for any situation I always recommend you check your state and local laws governing use in your area.

This goes the same for the rules your HOA or property management company enforces for residents of your community, whichever applies to your living situation.

If your local laws and/or HOA/Property Management covenants and regulations are vague or difficult to understand, contact your local fire department or HOA/property management personnel for clarification.

If something bad happens (injuries, property damage, etc.), you most likely won’t be off the hook legally or financially for not understanding the rules.

Consult with a local attorney as well as your homeowner’s association or property management regarding potential liabilities if you have concerns.

Also, numerous organizations are lobbying to restrict fire pit use on balconies and that effort may be impacting your ability to use a fire pit in this manner.

For example, the Community Association Underwriters of America (CAU) recommends that HOA committees prohibit fire pits of any kind on balconies.

If you fall under a HOA, your community may be taking their advice so make sure you check with them before moving forward.

Local Fire Pit Laws and Balcony Fire Pits

During my research for this post, I found that many municipalities (at least in the U.S.) are taking their cue from the International Fire Code, or IFC, when it comes to an open-flame (i.e. fire pits, chimineas, bbq grills, etc.) on residential balconies. Per the IFC site, “the IFC is in use or adopted in 42 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.”

What’s the International Fire Code (IFC)? The IFC is a “comprehensive fire code [that] establishes minimum regulations for fire prevention and fire protection systems using prescriptive and performance-related provisions. It is founded on broad-based principles that make possible the use of new materials and new system designs.” – International Code Council

Long story short, the code is a set of basic guidelines that can have an impact on your ability to use a balcony fire pit in your locality if local fire regulations and policies in your area are guided by the IFC.

Keep in mind that local law, HOA and/or building management rules specific to your situation will be the final word.

The basics from the IFC regarding fire pits on balconies:

No using fire pits, grills, open flames, etc. on balconies within 10 feet of a combustible structure, unless:

the balcony is attached to a one (single-family home) or two-family dwelling (like a duplex). Any dwelling larger than two-family, like an apartment building or condo, may be a no-go.

the balcony is equipped with an automatic sprinkler system

These rules reduce the risk to a smaller number of people in smaller structures and ensure that if a fire did start due to fire pit use that it could be contained quickly to minimize damage and slow its spread. Pretty reasonable in my opinion.

Bottom line: You may be able to use a fire pit at your residence if your balcony is equipped with an automatic sprinkler system, regardless of the size of the dwelling.

No LP-gas containers that exceed 1 lb. gas capacity within 10 foot of a combustible structure, unless:

the balcony is attached to a one (single-family home) or two-family dwelling (duplex, very small apartment building/condo); like the entry above, it may not be permitted in buildings larger than two-family.

To meet a 1 lb. gas capacity requirement a 1 lb. propane bottle is your best bet., It’s basically the same kind you would use to fuel a portable camping stove.

A 1 lb. propane bottle may seem small for gas fire pit use, but you can get anywhere from 1.5 to around 2.5 hours of burn time per tank, depending on the size of the gas fire pit and how high or low you set the flame. Fill a couple of these bottles up and you’ve got plenty of fuel for longer fire pit sessions.

If you are required to go this route, you’ll need a 1lb. propane bottle adapter to connect your 1 lb. propane bottle to your gas fire pit’s propane regulator hose (see an image of 1lb/propane bottle and adapter below).

Pro Tip: If you are interested in filling these 1 lb. propane bottles up yourself, you can do so using a standard 20 lb. propane tank, the same one you typically see used with barbecue grills in the U.S. To do this yourself you will need a propane tank refill adapter (see image below) to move the gas from the 20 lb. tank to the 1 lb. tank. If you choose not to fill them yourself, your local propane refill provider should be able to do it for you. Call ahead to make sure they are able to fill 1 lb. propane bottles.

1 lb. propane bottles and both adapters mentioned (1 lb. propane bottle adapter and the propane tank refill adapter) are all very inexpensive and easy to find at your local Lowe’s or Home Depot or online on with Amazon, REI, and others.

Bottom line: I kinda got away from the main gist of this section but I wanted to show that it was relatively easy to comply with the 1 lb. propane requirement if you want to use a gas fire pit on your balcony but have to comply with this constraint, i.e. no propane tanks greater than 1 lb. in capacity within 10 feet of a combustible structure.

If your balcony is made from wood you may be out of luck. If it’s made from concrete you should be fine. Check with local authorities and HOA/building management to be sure.

Other Common Laws, Rules, Regulations That May Impact Balcony Fire Pit Use

When looking into using a fire pit on a balcony (or any other place on your property for that matter) in your area, understand there may be rules that shut down any kind of fire pit use or imposes restrictions based on certain local conditions (burn bans due to drought, the presence of susceptible older buildings built prior to modern fire laws, etc.).

Restrictions often include:

bans on any flame-producing device on a balcony

bans on fire pit use of any kind

bans on open burning (burning of wood), but will allow gas fire pits under certain conditions

Some municipalities ban fire pit use on balconies altogether. Much like the outright ban mentioned before, concerns and restrictions are often related to at-risk structures and other specific local conditions.

Municipalities with many very old buildings will flat out ban fire pit use of any kind to enhance safety and preserve these buildings which are more susceptible to destruction from fire than modern buildings built to recent fire code.

Other municipalities, mostly rural ones, will ban outdoor open flames of any kind to reduce the risk of starting wildfires during dry conditions.

Often gas fire pits are exempted from this restriction as they don’t typically throw off sparks or embers that could ignite a fire outside of the fire pit. Authorization to use them is often on a case-by-case basis.

Bottom Line: Just remember to again check with local authorities and HOA/property management for accurate, up-to-date guidance. Each municipality will have a variety of locally-specific reasons for doing what they do regarding fire pits, especially fire pits on balconies. Keep yourself out of trouble by being informed.

What Kind of Fire Pit Should I Use On a Balcony?

When choosing a safe balcony size fire pit, or a mini balcony fire pit if you are space restricted, the propane option is always going to be the safest and cleanest.

In fact, you may find using a wood-burning fire pit on a balcony in your area is not an option either legally or because they’re prohibited by your HOA, property management, etc.

I’m personally a fan of wood-burning fire pits almost every time but not in this situation. Even if permitted, I wouldn’t consider them for balcony use, especially in an apartment or condo, due to concerns with the smoke annoying other residents, potential damage and/or discoloration to the balcony’s overhead cover and floor surface, and space concerns.

Regarding the space issue, from my experience you typically have to sit further back from a wood-burning fire pit due to the more intense heat they generate – this leaves less room for everything else.

When choosing a propane fire pit for a balcony, especially if space is at a minimum, I like a table-type propane fire pit, where the fuel source (the propane tank or bottle) is stored inside the fire pit’s base, out of the way.

There are many very nice propane fire pits available on the market that are designed with the tank on the outside with a regulator hose leading to the fire pit. I don’t like the trip risk of having a hose anywhere in the vicinity of my fire pit so I typically rule them out. I don’t know about you but I don’t want to be tripping over anything while I’m on a balcony and especially when there is a hot fire pit in the middle.

Another nice feature of many table-type propane fire pits is that they can double as a functional table on your balcony when not being used to warm the space. If you don’t have a lot of balcony space, fitting a table, chairs, a fire pit, and anything else could be a challenge.

Table propane fire pits typically have a cover of sorts that snaps into place when the fire pit is not in use. Once that cover is in place you can then have a fairly decent-sized table for other purposes.

Make sure to measure your balcony floor space and keep that number in mind when shopping for your fire pit and furniture.

Be sure to consider the size of your fire pit, the distance between the fire pit and planned seating, space behind the seating for moving around the balcony, and space for other items you plan to keep on your balcony (plants, a deck box, etc.).

If your fire pit is too large you are going to run out of space quickly and not have that pleasant functional space you were hoping for.

Specific Balcony Fire Pit Recommendations

There are a number of solid budget and “not-so-budget” options on the market that meet the specs I mentioned above. You can use them as a guidepost for according to your own budget and space restrictions (see accompanying image below).

They are:

Smaller Balcony Budget Option: Tacklife Propane Fire Pit Table (28”)

Smaller Balcony Non-Budget Option: Outland Living Series 410 (36”)

Larger Balcony Budget Option: U-MAX Propane Fire Pit Table (44”)

Large Balcony Non-Budget Option: Outland Living Series 401 (44”)

All are well-built and well-regarded, are propane-fueled with internal tank storage, and ironically the budget options are the only ones that come with a burner pan cover included to make a complete table.

The burner pan covers for the two non-budget options can be purchased separately as part of an accessory kit which includes the burner pan cover, a wind guard and a fire pit cover. Kind of annoying but there it is.

Note: All of my balcony fire pit recommendations are designed for use with a 20 lb propane tank. If you are under the constraints of the 1 lb. propane bottle safety limit discussed earlier, you will need the 1lb. propane bottle adapter mentioned to make them work together.

Specific details for each recommendation can be found on Amazon.

Conclusion: Fire Pits on Balconies

Yes, you can use a fire pit on a balcony and it will most likely be one that is propane-fueled and well suited to the amount of balcony space you have leftover after everything is considered.

I know I’ve harped on it incessantly throughout the article but the path you ultimately take will be guided by state and local law and HOA/property management regulations. Understand the laws/rules and get clarity if they seem ambiguous or poorly written.

For more on safe fire pit use check out my article Backyard Fire Pit Safety 101.

Take care, thanks for reading, and please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions.

All the best and good luck!

John

Related Questions

What about using a tabletop fire bowl on a balcony? Not all tabletop fire bowls are created equal. Most of the ones you will find on the market are gel-fueled and purely for looks, not warmth.

However, if you are severely space-constrained on your balcony and want the ambiance of a fire pit and warmth on a smaller scare, a propane-fueled tabletop fire bowl is most likely the best option.

These types of fire bowls work with patio tables that have the hole in the center for an umbrella. Instead of inserting the umbrella, the fire bowl sits atop the hole and is fueled through a regulator hose by a propane tank underneath the table.

Fire Topper makes one of the few propane tabletop fire bowls that I’ve found. Another option, though not a bowl per se, is the Bond portable tabletop steel fire bowl. The Bond model is more of a rectangle design that is well suited to a table in the same shape. Both are fueled through a hole in the center of the table.

What is the ideal overhead clearance for a propane fire pit? When placing a propane fire pit in an area with overhead cover (like a balcony) you will want to allow for clearance of between 6 to 7 ft. above the fire pit burner pan to adequately minimize the risk of fire or heat damage.

For more on picking the right spot for your fire pit check out my article Fire Pit Placement: Picking the Right Spot for Your Fire Pit.

Can I have a fire pit on my apartment balcony? – nanodrop.org

Can I have a fire pit on my apartment balcony?

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Can I have a fire pit on my apartment balcony?

Yes, a fire pit can be used safely and legally on a balcony. However, it is advised that prior to setting up a fire pit on a balcony, state and local laws, homeowner’s association covenants, rental agreements/apartment building rules, etc.

What is a fire balcony?

The latest version, known as fire balcony, is sprouting on the facades of several buildings nearing completion in the city. The fire balcony’s emergence is result of revisions in the city building code that require its use instead of the traditional fire escape in all semi fireproof multiple dwellings built after Dec.

Can you put a chiminea on a balcony?

Don’t: Place your chiminea directly onto any decking either a wood deck or a composite deck without this added layer of protection. The ash, sparks, and heat generated by these devices can quickly cause detrimental damage to the surface and even lead to fires.

Can you use a fire pit on a balcony UK?

In a small space, it is still possible to add a functional but stylish fire pit that is safe to use. For larger terraces or balconies, fire pits and tables will create a social area with seating positioned around.

Can you BBQ on a balcony?

The California Fire Code now prohibits charcoal grills, large propane grills, and other open flame cooking devices in multi-family housing communities. The new rules regulate the type of barbecues one can have on their patio or balcony. Grills can be stored on the balcony only after the tank is disconnected.

Can you use solo stove on balcony?

The short answer is yes you can, although you may want to check with your HOA or rental agreement, along with local ordinances. With any sort of fire, you will want to follow some of the safety tips and preparatory tasks listed below.

Is a balcony a fire escape?

There are three main types of fire escapes that are most commonly found: the exterior stairway, the party balcony, and the standard fire escape. The exterior stairway is the safest type of fire escape and the easiest to negotiate in a fire, as it most closely resembles an interior stairway.

Can you BBQ on your balcony?

Grills on balconies must be at least 30 inches from the building. You can only use gas and charcoal grills at least 15 feet from buildings. Electric grills are usually acceptable for balcony use.

Are Chimineas better than fire pits?

When it comes to the area where you’re going to put your appliance a chiminea is best for smaller areas whereas a fire pit is better for larger areas. A chiminea will look lost in a large garden and a fire pit will be too big for a small patio.

Will a chiminea burn my decking?

Since wood is a flammable material, there is always a level of danger when you have fire nearby. Anything that emits a high heat level, like a chiminea, poses a threat when close to flammable materials. They can also damage your deck by leaving burn marks on the wood and leave it looking sooty.

Which is the best fire escape ladder for a balcony?

Eventually, I can tell you for sure that the X-IT emergency fire escape ladder and the new e mergency fire escape rope ladder by Isop are the most suitable balcony fire escape ladders for this tricky job and even in overall terms they are above all the other ladders that I have checked.

Can you have a grill on an apartment balcony?

Yes, you can, if you choose an electric grill, which is clearly the best grill for apartment balcony to stay out of trouble. Electric grills built for apartments often can smoke food in a similar fashion to charcoal grills.

Where was the balcony fire in Southbank Melbourne?

A balcony fire in Whiteman Street where residents were evacuated. Credit: 7NEWS A large fire tore through an apartment block in Melbourne’s Southbank overnight, with footage showing flames and smoke billowing from the 19th floor balcony.

Can a charcoal grill cause an apartment fire?

A fire is very likely if you use charcoal because it emits sparks and reacts to the wind. If there are trees in your vicinity, this could quickly spread and cause an awful fire. Entire buildings have burnt down due to a few simple sparks in the wind. Apartment Balcony Options: Try an Electric Grill

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