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Can You Use Powdered Ginger In Place Of Fresh Ginger | Fresh Ginger Vs. Ground Ginger: Spiceography Showdown 10730 Good Rating This Answer

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Use 1/4 teaspoon of ground ginger for every 1 tablespoon of fresh ginger called for in a recipe. Keep in mind, however, that it usually doesn’t work the other way around. That is, fresh ginger typically does not substitute for ginger powder in dessert recipes.The best ginger substitute when it’s used as the fresh root? Ground ginger. It’s not perfect, but it’s really the best option. Here’s the substitution ratio: substitute ¼ teaspoon ground ginger for every 1 tablespoon grated ginger.Substitutes for Ginger

fresh or ground ginger, substitute 1 tsp. ground allspice, ground cinnamon, ground mace, or ground nutmeg.

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Can I Use Ground Ginger Instead of Fresh Ginger? | livestrong

You shouldn’t substitute ground ginger for fresh ginger. They don’t match in flavor and can compromise a dish when interchanged.

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Source: www.livestrong.com

Date Published: 7/8/2022

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Flavorful Ginger Substitute Ideas to Use When You’re in a Pinch

If you don’t have any ground ginger, you can use fresh ginger. You’ll just need to use more, because ground ginger is more concentrated.

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Date Published: 12/20/2021

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Best Ginger Substitute – A Couple Cooks

1. For fresh ginger root = ground ginger. … The best ginger substitute when it’s used as the fresh root? Ground ginger. It’s not perfect, but …

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Fresh Ginger Vs. Ground Ginger: SPICEography Showdown

If you do have to substitute one for the other, remember that 1 tablespoon of grated fresh ginger is equal to 1/8 teaspoon of ground ginger. Is …

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Date Published: 2/21/2022

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How to Substitute Ground Ginger for Grated Gingerroot – eHow

The simple answer is yes, you can substitute one for the other by using powdered ginger when a recipe calls for fresh ginger and vice versa. However, you cannot …

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Need a Substitute for Ginger? Here Are 9 to Try – PureWow

Ground ginger is less complex and spicy than fresh, but it’s the closest you can get in a bind. Just be careful about how much you use—ground …

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4 Best Substitutes for Ginger from Galangal to Allspice – Food52

If a recipe calls for fresh ginger, the easiest swap is ground ginger, as it’s the same ingredient in a different form. Still, it’s important to …

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Can I use ginger powder instead of fresh ginger? – Oven Via

If you are using a recipe that calls for fresh ginger you can use ground ginger as a substitute but they do not taste the same.

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Can you substitute ginger powder for fresh ginger?

The best ginger substitute when it’s used as the fresh root? Ground ginger. It’s not perfect, but it’s really the best option. Here’s the substitution ratio: substitute ¼ teaspoon ground ginger for every 1 tablespoon grated ginger.

What can I use if I don’t have fresh ginger?

Substitutes for Ginger

fresh or ground ginger, substitute 1 tsp. ground allspice, ground cinnamon, ground mace, or ground nutmeg.

Does ginger powder taste the same as fresh ginger?

Fresh Ginger: What’s the Difference? Ground ginger is simply dried ginger pulverized to a fine powder, but that process gives it a different flavor and different properties. Flavor: Fresh ginger is sweeter, more pungent, and has an overall more complex flavor than ground ginger.

How much ground ginger equals 2 inches fresh ginger?

Other authorities suggest a 1-inch piece of fresh ginger is the equivalent to 1 1/4 teaspoons of ground or 1 tablespoon crystallized ginger. Quite a variation!

How many teaspoons of ground ginger equals fresh?

Use 1/4 teaspoon of ground ginger for every 1 tablespoon of fresh ginger called for in a recipe. Keep in mind, however, that it usually doesn’t work the other way around. That is, fresh ginger typically does not substitute for ginger powder in dessert recipes.

Is raw ginger better than powder?

The answer is no. Ground ginger contains some different medicinal benefits than raw ginger root. The process of creating ground ginger reduces the amount of gingerol it contains. Gingerol is the active component of root ginger that provides many medicinal health properties.

What does ground ginger taste like?

What Does Ground Ginger Taste Like? Fresh ginger root is pungent, spicy, and sweet, and while ground ginger retains some of that pepper spice and sweetness, its flavor is much more mild. If you seek out a very high-quality ground ginger, you might find the flavor more intense and reminiscent of the flavor of fresh.

Is powdered ginger good for you?

Ginger is loaded with antioxidants, compounds that prevent stress and damage to your body’s DNA. They may help your body fight off chronic diseases like high blood pressure, heart disease, and diseases of the lungs, plus promote healthy aging.

Out of Ginger? Use These Substitutes

Ginger has a very distinctive punch. When a recipe calls for fresh ginger and you’re out of it, you have options. While there’s no exact dupe for the distinctive root, you can substitute similar or complementary spices that can equally enhance your recipe. They will change the final product a little bit from what it was originally meant to be, but that can be a good thing.

Ground Ginger

Ground ginger is going to be much milder and less astringent than fresh ginger, without the essential oils that give it its kick. Depending on how old your ground ginger is, its flavor could be even more diminished. But if you’re in a pinch, it’s probably the best thing. Use 1/4 teaspoon of ground ginger for every 1 tablespoon of fresh ginger called for in a recipe.

Keep in mind, however, that it usually doesn’t work the other way around. That is, fresh ginger typically does not substitute for ginger powder in dessert recipes. As mentioned, it’s rather astringent and has quite a different flavor profile. In this case, you’re better off substituting another spice altogether.

Other Spices

If you’re making a bread, baked good, or dessert that calls for ground ginger, an equal amount of allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, mace, or nutmeg just might work. It’s not that allspice or cinnamon tastes like ginger, but that they’re complementary spices. Pumpkin pie spice is another option to consider. It’s typically a blend of ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. These substitutes will change the flavor and color of the dish slightly but will work just fine in a pinch. When doing this, add 1/2 the amount of ground ginger called for, and go from there, tasting as you go.

Crystallized Ginger

Crystallized ginger is also known as candied ginger or glace ginger (glace means ice in French, and this ginger looks like it’s coated in ice crystals). It’s basically fresh ginger that has been cooked in sugar water and rolled in sugar. If you have a recipe that calls for this ingredient, you can substitute 1/8 teaspoon of ground ginger for every tablespoon of crystallized ginger. You may need to add sugar, to taste, to compensate.

That works out to 1 teaspoon of ground ginger for every 1/2 cup of crystallized ginger. If your recipe uses crystallized ginger as a garnish, choose something else, or omit it. Ground ginger won’t be a good substitute in this situation.

Freezing and Storing

Fresh ginger freezes beautifully. Keep a ginger root in your freezer, and pull it out whenever you need it for a recipe. You don’t even have to thaw it first. Just grate as much as you need, and stick the rest back in the freezer for next time.

There are a few tricks for storing ginger properly. You can even ensure that you have ginger on hand when you need it by growing the flowering plant on your windowsill.

Best Ginger Substitute

Realized you’re all out of ginger or can’t find it at the store? Here’s the best ginger substitute for both the fresh root and the dried ground spice.

Making a recipe that calls for ginger and don’t have it? Ginger is the root of a flowering plant that comes from Southeast Asia. It’s used in recipes both as the fresh grated root and as a dried, ground spice. The fresh root is very common in Asian cuisine and the dried version is common in baking. Ginger adds peppery, pungent flavor to recipes both sweet and savory.

Realized you’re all out, or can’t find any at the store? Here’s the best ginger substitute for your conundrum.

Keep in mind: some recipes require fresh ginger

Cooking a recipe with the word “ginger” in the title, like Ginger Tea, Ginger Lime Hummus or a Ginger Martini? Or even Gingerbread Pancakes? If so, try to find the real thing if at all possible! For these types of recipes, it’s worth waiting for when you’re able to find it. But if you must: keep reading for the best ginger substitutes.

Best ginger substitute

1. For fresh ginger root = ground ginger.

The best ginger substitute when it’s used as the fresh root? Ground ginger. It’s not perfect, but it’s really the best option. Here’s the substitution ratio: substitute ¼ teaspoon ground ginger for every 1 tablespoon grated ginger. This works as a substitute in fried rice or stir fry recipes.

Note: Some sources recommend galangal as a substitute for fresh ginger root, which is in the same plant family. You can certainly do so, but typically in the US you can only find galangal at a specialty international grocery store…where you could also likely find ginger root.

2. Allspice (baking only).

The best ginger substitute in baking? Allspice! This warm spice mimics the peppery notes of ginger and adds a complexity. You can use this as a 1:1 substitute with ginger. Again, make sure you’re not doing this in a stir fry: only attempt this in baking when ginger is used as a cozy spice.

3. Cinnamon + nutmeg (baking only).

The next best substitute for ginger in baking is cinnamon and nutmeg used together. Cinnamon balances out the strong bite of the nutmeg, making this combo a bit closer to the flavor of ginger. Because ground ginger is often used with cinnamon and nutmeg, it naturally evokes the vibe of this spice. Again, only do this in sweet baked goods.

Related recipes

Here are some recipes where you could use this ginger substitute:

Ginger Substitute Ideas When Youre in a Pinch

Many of us think of ginger as the golden-hued powder that gets pushed to the back of the spice cabinet until we need it for a baking recipe, such as gingersnaps or ginger-blueberry muffins. But this spicy, aromatic ingredient, which has been used in its fresh form for ages in classic Asian dishes like stir-fries and soups as well as Indian curries, has great potential beyond sweet treats. Its pungent, almost-peppery flavor can warm meats and vegetables in a flash or make an excellent addition to marinades and sauces. If you don’t have any ground or fresh ginger on hand, here are some ideas for when you need a ginger substitute, stat.

Can I Use Ground Ginger Instead of Fresh Ginger?

Ground ginger is not a substitute for minced ginger. Image Credit: tycoon751/iStock/Getty Images

When you come across a recipe that calls for either ground or fresh ginger, know that ground ginger is not a substitute for minced ginger or fresh ginger. But either one can provide health benefits, which include guarding against the flu and holding nausea at bay.

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Tip You shouldn’t substitute ground ginger for fresh ginger. They don’t match in flavor and can compromise a dish when interchanged.

Ground Ginger vs. Fresh Ginger

Baking and cooking connoisseurs will find differences between ground and fresh ginger. The following lists why you shouldn’t opt to use ground ginger to replace fresh ginger in a recipe:

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Different tastes. Fresh ginger doesn’t taste much like ground ginger, and because of this, the two variations of gingers are used in different dishes altogether. For example, dried and ground ginger often are used to flavor baked goods like ginger and banana bread, muffins and pies, according to the College of Agriculture Sciences from The Pennsylvania State University.

The University of Rochester Medical Center states that the fresh ginger root contains essential oils and resins that give ginger its odor and spicy flavor. This is why you see fresh ginger used in Asian and Indian cuisine for stir-fries and sauces.

The University of Rochester Medical Center states that the fresh ginger root contains essential oils and resins that give ginger its odor and spicy flavor. This is why you see fresh ginger used in Asian and Indian cuisine for stir-fries and sauces. Flavor disbursement. Ground ginger is more easily dispersed in a dish and can withstand higher cooking temperatures without compromising the flavor. With fresh ginger, flavor is released into a dish more slowly. As such, adding ginger early to a dish will provide a hint of flavor. Adding it at the end will bring a pungent taste, per the Texas A&M AgriLIFE Extension System.

Amount needed. According to Harvard Health Publishing, ground spices are much more potent than fresh, so all it takes is a dash to release flavor. Even as little as an eighth of a teaspoon can add flavor.

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If this entices you to cook with the spice, you can purchase ground ginger in the spice section of a supermarket.

Shopping for fresh ginger, however, requires more of a discerning eye. You should look for a ginger root that feels firm and heavy, has smooth skin and smells fresh — you will find the best when in season during the fall. You should avoid any ginger with wrinkled or moldy skin and feels light in weight. You can store fresh ginger wrapped in plastic or a paper towel for up to three weeks in the refrigerator and six months in the freezer, according to the American Culinary Foundation.

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Health Benefits of Ginger

Whether you use ground or fresh ginger, you can reap the health benefits this spice offers, which include the following:

Keeping you from getting sick and helping you feel better when you do get a cold or flu. In an October 2014 perspective from Botanics: Targets and Therapy, researchers found that ginger components contain antimicrobial, antifungal and anti-infective properties.

Protecting you from UVB rays. In this same perspective, researchers also found that ginger can serve as an efficient prevention of ultraviolet B rays and a possible agent against UVB-induced skin disorders.

Preventing nausea. In a March 2016 study from Integrative Medicine Insights, researchers found ginger effective in the prevention of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy and chemotherapy. Although they don’t find any consensus on the correct dosage among clinical studies, they do find a recommended safe daily dose of 1,000 milligrams. This can be taken through ground ginger tea, supplements and ginger added to recipes.

Read more: 6 Best Cinnamon Substitutes for Baking and Cooking

Ginger Substitute Ideas When Youre in a Pinch

Many of us think of ginger as the golden-hued powder that gets pushed to the back of the spice cabinet until we need it for a baking recipe, such as gingersnaps or ginger-blueberry muffins. But this spicy, aromatic ingredient, which has been used in its fresh form for ages in classic Asian dishes like stir-fries and soups as well as Indian curries, has great potential beyond sweet treats. Its pungent, almost-peppery flavor can warm meats and vegetables in a flash or make an excellent addition to marinades and sauces. If you don’t have any ground or fresh ginger on hand, here are some ideas for when you need a ginger substitute, stat.

Best Ginger Substitute

Realized you’re all out of ginger or can’t find it at the store? Here’s the best ginger substitute for both the fresh root and the dried ground spice.

Making a recipe that calls for ginger and don’t have it? Ginger is the root of a flowering plant that comes from Southeast Asia. It’s used in recipes both as the fresh grated root and as a dried, ground spice. The fresh root is very common in Asian cuisine and the dried version is common in baking. Ginger adds peppery, pungent flavor to recipes both sweet and savory.

Realized you’re all out, or can’t find any at the store? Here’s the best ginger substitute for your conundrum.

Keep in mind: some recipes require fresh ginger

Cooking a recipe with the word “ginger” in the title, like Ginger Tea, Ginger Lime Hummus or a Ginger Martini? Or even Gingerbread Pancakes? If so, try to find the real thing if at all possible! For these types of recipes, it’s worth waiting for when you’re able to find it. But if you must: keep reading for the best ginger substitutes.

Best ginger substitute

1. For fresh ginger root = ground ginger.

The best ginger substitute when it’s used as the fresh root? Ground ginger. It’s not perfect, but it’s really the best option. Here’s the substitution ratio: substitute ¼ teaspoon ground ginger for every 1 tablespoon grated ginger. This works as a substitute in fried rice or stir fry recipes.

Note: Some sources recommend galangal as a substitute for fresh ginger root, which is in the same plant family. You can certainly do so, but typically in the US you can only find galangal at a specialty international grocery store…where you could also likely find ginger root.

2. Allspice (baking only).

The best ginger substitute in baking? Allspice! This warm spice mimics the peppery notes of ginger and adds a complexity. You can use this as a 1:1 substitute with ginger. Again, make sure you’re not doing this in a stir fry: only attempt this in baking when ginger is used as a cozy spice.

3. Cinnamon + nutmeg (baking only).

The next best substitute for ginger in baking is cinnamon and nutmeg used together. Cinnamon balances out the strong bite of the nutmeg, making this combo a bit closer to the flavor of ginger. Because ground ginger is often used with cinnamon and nutmeg, it naturally evokes the vibe of this spice. Again, only do this in sweet baked goods.

Related recipes

Here are some recipes where you could use this ginger substitute:

Fresh Ginger Vs. Ground Ginger: SPICEography Showdown

Both dried and fresh ginger come from the underground stem of the ginger plant (Zingiber officinale) which is a part of the Zingiberaceae family. This means that the ginger plant is related to other spices like turmeric and cardamom. Ginger is a popular spice used to flavor beverages like ginger ale and ginger beer and is an important ingredient in a variety of Asian cuisines as well. It is used in dishes from the Caribbean, Africa and Europe. It is from China but spread throughout the world on the spice routes that existed as early as the first century.

The forms of ginger that are most familiar to Americans are the fresh form which involves peeling and chopping or grating the ginger, and the dried and ground form. This week on SPICEography Showdown, let’s take a look at how these two forms compare to each other and how to choose which one to use.

Do fresh and dried ginger taste the same?

Fresh ginger has a flavor that can be described as fiery and pungent. Some experts describe the scent as similar to that of camphor while being peppery like cloves. When it is cooked in its fresh form, ginger tenderizes and spreads its flavor to everything it touches.

The strong flavor of fresh ginger is more complex but it can be somewhat diluted due to the fact that it has more moisture than its dried counterpart. It is also important to note that fresh ginger’s essential oils can disappear at high temperatures, thus affecting the flavor.

In its ground and dried form, ginger still retains its spicy kick but with less of the flavor complexities that you would get with the fresh form. However, ground ginger has the benefit of being able to withstand higher cooking temperatures without no change in the flavor.

Can you use ground ginger as a substitute for fresh ginger and vice versa?

Each form can be used as a substitute for the other but only in a pinch. If you use ground ginger in place of fresh, you should use less of it as your dish may be too spicy otherwise. You should also expect to the lose some of the additional flavor notes that the fresh form brings to a dish. If you use fresh ginger in place of ground ginger, you will have to use more and you may need to grind it finely as chunks of ginger may affect the texture of your dish.

If you do have to substitute one for the other, remember that 1 tablespoon of grated fresh ginger is equal to 1/8 teaspoon of ground ginger.

Is fresh ginger better for you than ground ginger?

The drying process does remove some of some of the gingerol content. Gingerols are phytonutrients that have anti-inflammatory properties. However, the process may actually increase levels of other healthy compounds such as shogaol. Shogaol has similar health benefits to the gingerols. This means that both the dried and fresh forms are beneficial with the fresh form being (arguably) slightly better.

How to Substitute Ground Ginger for Grated Gingerroot

How to Substitute Ground Ginger for Grated Gingerroot Image Credit: Science Photo Library/Science Photo Library/GettyImages

Pungent and sweet at the same time, ginger is a spice unlike any other. Originally from southern China, ginger quickly caught on with traders on the spice route and made its way to India, the Caribbean, Africa and Europe while becoming known for its medicinal effects in soothing digestive upset. Today, India grows the most ginger worldwide.

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Experts advise that you use the form of ginger for which your recipe calls whenever possible. A quick trip to the market may be worth it, but you can usually substitute ginger powder for ginger root using the recommended ratio.

Remember Your Substitution Ratio

Fresh ginger is one of those spices you don’t always have on hand. When you buy it for a recipe and have some left over, it may spoil – usually by growing mold – even when kept in the refrigerator. So, when a recipe calls for fresh ginger, you may wonder if it’s OK to use powdered ginger instead of fresh.

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The simple answer is yes, you can substitute one for the other by using powdered ginger when a recipe calls for fresh ginger and vice versa. However, you cannot substitute on a one-to-one ratio. You use much less of the powdered form because it is concentrated, although the exact amount of powdered ginger to use depends partly on personal taste. The substitution formula for powdered and fresh ginger is: 1/8 to 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger = 1 tablespoon fresh ginger.

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Since there is a big difference between 1/8 teaspoon and 1/2 teaspoon, start with 1/8 teaspoon of ground ginger, stirring as the ground ginger is dissolving. Let the mixture cook for a few minutes and then taste it. If the ginger taste is apparent and seems like the appropriate amount to you, stop there. If you’d like a stronger ginger flavor, continue adding the ginger powder 1/8 teaspoon at a time until you’re satisfied with the result.

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Substitute Ginger Powder for Ginger Root

Is fresh ginger a good ground ginger substitute? Just because one can be substituted for the other doesn’t mean it’s always a good idea to do so, as the two provide different flavors to a recipe. Ground ginger has a more one-dimensional taste than the complexity of fresh ginger. This will be more obvious if you’ve previously enjoyed a recipe made with one and then try to substitute one for the other.

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Prepare Fresh Ginger for Use

Fresh ginger is a curious-looking food, with its gnarled, bony points and thin, brown skin. Many cooks use a vegetable peeler to peel away the skin, which does work but tends to take unnecessary pieces of the precious ginger with the skin.

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An easier way is to use a spoon to scrape off the thin skin and then slice it according to the directions in your recipe, which may call for you to mince it finely, slice it diagonally or julienne it into thin strips. You may want to remove large pieces after cooking so they flavor the dish, but you don’t eat them.

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Know the Types of Ginger

Fresh and powdered ginger are only two types of the spice you may come across at a market or as an ingredient in a recipe. The types of ginger are:

Crystallized ginger

Dried ginger.

Fresh ginger

Pickled ginger

Powdered ginger

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Each type of ginger is unique, and one cannot always be substituted for another kind. For example, crystallized ginger is typically sugar coated, so it would be a good choice for baked goods but not for a main dish unless you want it to be sweetened. Pickled ginger, on the other hand, most likely would not be the best choice for pastries.

Exchange Other Spices for Ginger

If you’re in the middle of assembling your dish and realize you’re totally out of all forms of ginger, you have several options. For example, if you need a substitute for ginger in stir fry or baked goods, try cinnamon, nutmeg or allspice in place of ginger.

You can use one-to-one substitution if your recipe also calls for ground ginger but use less of the ground spices if your recipe specifies fresh ginger. Be aware, though, that your recipes will taste different because there’s no spice quite like ginger.

Need a Substitute for Ginger? Here Are 9 to Try

There are dozens of reasons to incorporate more fresh ginger into your diet. It builds immunity, can treat nausea and tastes pretty damn delicious to boot. So, you were going to whip up some baked sesame-ginger salmon for dinner—only to find the nub in the back of your fridge has gone bad. Need a substitute for ginger? While there’s no spot-on replacement for the fresh root, here are nine that can work in a pinch.

Ground Ginger

OK, so you may not have fresh ginger to grate, but could its powdered cousin be hiding somewhere in your pantry? Ground ginger is less complex and spicy than fresh, but it’s the closest you can get in a bind. Just be careful about how much you use—ground ginger has a more concentrated flavor. Substitute ⅛ to ½ teaspoon ground ginger for every tablespoon of fresh ginger called for in your recipe.

Candied Ginger

Also called crystallized ginger, you’ll likely find this alternative nestled in with the dried fruit at your supermarket. It’s made by cooking ginger root in sugar water and rolling it in sugar, making it a lot sweeter than its raw predecessor. That means you’ll need a lot of it to pack the same punch as ground or fresh ginger in a recipe—but if that’s all you have, work with what you’ve got. Especially if you’re baking. Replace every teaspoon of ground ginger with a ½ cup of minced candied ginger. Substitute every tablespoon of fresh ginger with 3 tablespoons minced candied ginger.

Allspice, Cinnamon or Nutmeg

This is an ideal switch for recipes that call for ground ginger, but it can help if you’re all out of fresh ginger too. Allspice is a popular dry spice replacement, thanks to its mildly sweet-and-spicy flavor. If you’re all out of allspice too, use cinnamon, nutmeg or even ground cloves instead. If you only have cinnamon sticks, a two-inch stick is about equivalent to ¼ teaspoon of ground cinnamon. Swap in a ¼ teaspoon allspice, cinnamon or nutmeg for every tablespoon of fresh ginger. Substitute for ground ginger in equal parts.

Mace

Don’t sweat it if you’ve never heard of it. This aromatic swap is made of the lace-like coating found on nutmeg seeds, so its flavor is warm, spicy, peppery and sweet. It’s ideal for desserts that call for ground ginger, but if your recipe calls for fresh, use ¼ teaspoon of mace for every tablespoon of fresh ginger. Substitute for ground ginger in equal parts.

Turmeric or Cardamom

Ginger root is closely related to these two wonder spices. Turmeric leans earthy and bitter instead of sharp and spicy, while cardamom is nutty, herbaceous and citrusy. So, they aren’t identical substitutes, but they’ll give your dinner a certain je ne sais quoi that’ll be lacking if you omit ginger altogether. If you go with turmeric, remember that its vibrant yellow color might not suit the recipe you’re making, so take appearance into account before you swap. Substitute turmeric powder or ground cardamom for ground ginger in equal parts.

Galangal

It may be harder to find, but galangal a pretty uncanny replacement for fresh ginger. It’s a root commonly found in Southeast Asian cuisines that some describe as a cross between ginger and turmeric flavor-wise. Your best bet is finding it at an Asian grocery store or online. Ginger is more pungent, so you can use a bit more galangal when substituting (for instance, if the recipe calls for 1 tablespoon ginger, substitute 1 to 1¼ tablespoon galangal). Substitute grated or minced galangal for fresh ginger in equal parts and adjust to taste if you want it stronger. Do the same when substituting galangal powder for ground ginger.

When You Restock, Here’s How to Store Ginger to Make it Last

First and foremost, let’s make sure you’re buying the best piece of ginger root possible at the grocery store. Always choose pieces that are firm and smooth; they shouldn’t be soft or wrinkly. Once you bring the ginger home, store the whole root in a resealable plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your fridge. Push out all the air when you seal it and it’ll keep for about one month.

If you’ve already cut the ginger, pat it dry with a paper towel before storing the same way. Cut ginger will spoil faster than whole, so be sure to use it in a timely fashion. Frozen whole ginger root will keep indefinitely, on the other hand. Just pop it in a freezer bag or freezer-safe container and store. Don’t bother thawing it when you need to use some—frozen ginger is a breeze to grate.

Oh, and for the record, you never have to peel it.

RELATED: Here’s How to Grate Ginger Without Making a Complete Mess

The 4 Best Substitutes for Ginger

I grew up with a steady supply of fresh ginger in my kitchen. While some kids woke up to the smell of pancakes or eggs and bacon, I rose to the sweet and slightly spicy scent of my mother’s ginger tea, a cup of which warmed me up on cold winter mornings and settled my stomach for the breakfast I’d prepare for myself before school (I was a very picky eater). Nowadays, my mornings begin with a strong cup of coffee, but I always have some fresh ginger on hand in case I’m feeling tea or am cooking something that could use a little extra oomph. But once in a while I reach into the crisper of my fridge to find that I’ve forgotten to replenish my stash: All that’s left behind is a shriveled up and slightly moldy knob that’s headed straight for the trash.

If you find yourself there, too, there’s still hope! When it comes to the best ginger substitutes, it’s certainly easier with some recipes than others. For example, apple pie cookies would be fine with a substitute, but in something like gingery spice cake (or my mom’s tea!), where ginger plays a main role, you might just need to head to the store. Regardless, there are likely a few items knocking around your pantry that can do the trick.

4 Substitutes for Ginger

1. Ground Ginger

If a recipe calls for fresh ginger, the easiest swap is ground ginger, as it’s the same ingredient in a different form. Still, it’s important to remember that ground ginger is much more potent. If you swap it 1:1, your dish might have more heat and earthiness than expected. Instead, for every 1 tablespoon of fresh ginger called for, use ¼ to ½ teaspoon of ground ginger.

2. Crystallized Ginger

Crystallized ginger is fresh ginger that’s been boiled in a mixture of sugar and water, then rolled in sugar. It’s best used as a substitute for ground or fresh ginger in sweet dishes. For added texture and a bit of ginger with every bite, keep the pieces a little larger. Otherwise, very finely chop it. Be sure to separate pieces that might stick together in the batter by tossing them in with the dry ingredients first.

3. Galangal

Both galangal and ginger are rhizomes, plants with stems that spread underground and let off shoots that become new rootstalks. Ginger and galangal are quite similar in overall flavor, so if you can get it at your grocery store, the two can be swapped 1:1. The same goes for ground galangal and ground ginger. But be aware that galangal has piney and citrusy notes that ginger does not; if the recipe you’re substituting it in includes citrus or lemongrass as well as ginger, galangal is a great option.

4. Allspice, Turmeric, Cardamom, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, or Mace

Of course, none of these spices really tastes like ginger. Instead, think of them as alternatives rather than direct substitutes: In a recipe that calls for ground ginger, you can substitute the same amount of any of these spices—or a mixture of them. This method will work best in quick breads and other baked goods.

Allspice is a great option if you need a substitute for ginger is a hearty stew, like Jamaican beef stew. It will supply the sweet spice that the ginger would have added. Turmeric, cardamom, and ginger all belong to the Zingiberaceae family of flowering plants. The difference is that we eat the pods and seeds of cardamom rather than the root, like we do with ginger and turmeric. Cardamom will add sweet, spicy, and citrusy flavor to cakes, curries, and drinks like mulled wine. Warm and earthy turmeric is a great addition to rice dishes, soups, and smoothies. Cinnamon and nutmeg are sweet and woody, making them fine swaps for ginger especially in custards, cakes, and pies like this pear ginger galette. Because nutmeg’s intense flavor includes notes of clove, it can add a welcome pepperiness in place of ginger’s spice. Maybe you need a substitute for the substitute? Mace is the skin found around a nutmeg seed, just slightly muted in flavor and without nutmeg’s subtle sweetness.

Fresh Ginger and Ginger Substitute: What to Use and When

Cassie Marshall

Cassie brings decades of experience to the Kitchen Community. She is a noted chef and avid gardener. Her new book “Healthy Eating Through the Garden” will be released shortly. When not writing or speaking about food and gardens Cassie can be found puttering around farmer’s markets and greenhouses looking for the next great idea.

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