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Can You Use Powdered Eggs For Scrambled Eggs | Powdered Egg (Thrive Scrambled Egg Mix) Vs Fresh Egg Best 272 Answer

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Just like you would traditional eggs to make scrambled eggs, fried eggs, and omelets, you can do the same with the powdered egg. Mix your powder with water to create as many eggs as you want or need, and then prepare them the way you usually would. You might want to add the mixture to a skillet with butter or oil.Actually edible. Not much in terms of weird smell or taste. They didn’t taste exactly like regular scrambled eggs, but they were okay. My two sons, who love eggs, even ate a few of them.Whole egg powder is the dried form of whole eggs. It is commonly used as a whole egg substitute in protein-rich baked goods due to its longer shelf life compared to fresh eggs. A wide variety of whole egg powder products are commercially available: Standard whole egg.

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Powdered Egg (Thrive Scrambled Egg Mix) vs Fresh Egg – Can you use powdered eggs for scrambled eggs, details of this topic

This was an interesting experiment. The results were revealing in that although the two samples didn’t look exactly the same the taste was. Since I’ve used the mix in an omelet and I couldn’t tell the difference at all.

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Perfect Scrambled Eggs Made From Powdered Eggs

1. Add water and whip air into the powdered whole eggs before scrambling or adding to a fritatta. · 2. When you reconstitute powdered eggs they …

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Augason Farms Scrambled Egg Powder. These powdered scrambled eggs are the only ones we’ve tried that we can recommend. Make sure to try the …

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Powdered eggs can be used without rehydration when baking, and can be rehydrated to make dishes such as scrambled eggs and omelettes. Pure dried whole eggs from …

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Powdered Egg (Thrive Scrambled Egg Mix) vs Fresh Egg

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Are powdered scrambled eggs good?

Actually edible. Not much in terms of weird smell or taste. They didn’t taste exactly like regular scrambled eggs, but they were okay. My two sons, who love eggs, even ate a few of them.

Can you substitute powdered eggs for real eggs?

Whole egg powder is the dried form of whole eggs. It is commonly used as a whole egg substitute in protein-rich baked goods due to its longer shelf life compared to fresh eggs. A wide variety of whole egg powder products are commercially available: Standard whole egg.

Do powdered eggs taste like eggs?

The eggs come in powdered form, you just add water, and the shelf life is very long. And they taste and cook just like real eggs.

Does Mcdonalds use powdered eggs or real eggs?

Good question. Our breakfast menu items are all made with real eggs—they’re just prepared a little differently for each sandwich.

Does McDonald’s use powdered eggs?

McDonald’s The folded eggs and the egg that comes in McDonald’s sausage burrito are premade from liquid eggs, then flash-frozen and sent to restaurants, where the dishes are warmed before being served.

How much powdered egg does it take to equal one egg?

Usage. One pound Whole Powdered Eggs will make about 40 eggs. For one egg: 3 Tablespoons Water + 1 Tablespoons Whole Egg Powder.

What can I use powdered eggs for?

Powdered eggs can be used without rehydration when baking, and can be rehydrated to make dishes such as scrambled eggs and omelettes.

Is powdered egg any good?

Powdered Egg carries all the usual nutritional benefits of a fresh egg, without the worry of it going bad! They offer a good source of protein, immune-boosting properties, and antibacterial qualities.

Can you whip powdered eggs?

You can easily have egg for a recipe by simply mixing the powder with room temperature water. The reconstituted powder whips like fresh egg white and, because it is pasteurized, can be used safely without cooking or baking it.

Do powdered eggs need to be refrigerated after opening?

Powdered eggs are less expensive than fresh eggs, do not require refrigeration, and can be easily transported anywhere. The container should be stored in a dark, cool place.

What are fake scrambled eggs made of?

Those “eggs” are actually made with egg whites, yolks, soybean oil, water, natural flavoring agents, salt and a mix preservatives and stabilizers like xanthan gum, citric acid and cellulose gum. But Dunkin’ certainly isn’t the only chain serving up multi-ingredient egg patties.

What is the shelf life of powdered eggs?

Powdered eggs have a storage life of 5–10 years depending on the environment. The shelf life can further be extended by placing eggs powdered in air tight containers under anaerobic conditions or placed in a cool storage place. There is no need for any refrigeration or cold chain as in case of liquid eggs.

Are powdered eggs cheaper than regular eggs?

In powdered form, the eggs can be added to baked recipes without the need to mix them with a liquid ahead of time. These eggs are generally fairly cheap too. A pound (0.45 kg) of dehydrated eggs is significantly cheaper than purchasing an equivalent number of fresh eggs.

How do you reconstitute powdered eggs?

To reconstitute powdered eggs, mix together one heaping tablespoon of egg powder and 2 tablespoons of water. Let the mixture sit for about 5 minutes, then use as you would a normal egg. As for storage, your powdered eggs should keep for about a year if kept in an airtight container.

How to Use Powdered Eggs

Did you know that powdered eggs are a thing? Not everyone knows about powdered eggs, but they do exist, and you can use them as a replacement for traditional eggs if you need to do so.

While it is common to see people purchasing fresh eggs from the supermarket and using them for baking different meals, there is nothing wrong with using the powdered version. However, if you plan on using the powdered version, you should know precisely how to make different meals with them. Continue reading to get all the information you could need on powdered eggs.

Mix With a Small Amount of Water

The powdered eggs are dehydrated eggs made using the same method as powdered milk and other powdered substances. Because you will have a non-liquid blend, you may need to mix the powder solution with water before preparing specific recipes. Combining a tablespoon of the powdered eggs and two tablespoons of water will help you create exactly what you would get if you were to crack a medium-sized egg over a bowl before adding it to a recipe. It is truly that simple!

Add to Your Dry Ingredients

Although mixing powdered eggs with water is one way to use them before preparing scrambled eggs and other meals, you do not always need to mix the powder with water to make use of these eggs. If you are preparing a baked recipe, such as bread, cupcakes, or even a cake, you do not need to mix your powder with water. Instead, you can add the powdered eggs to your blend of dry ingredients before adding water, milk, and any other components that you might mix in with your dry ingredients. Your recipe will turn out just as good as it would if you were to use traditional eggs, but with much less of a mess.

Use Them to Create Tasty Breakfast Meals

You can create tasty breakfast meals with ease while using powdered eggs. Just like you would traditional eggs to make scrambled eggs, fried eggs, and omelets, you can do the same with the powdered egg. Mix your powder with water to create as many eggs as you want or need, and then prepare them the way you usually would. You might want to add the mixture to a skillet with butter or oil. You can even add some of your favorite extras for omelets to the dish, such as chopped spinach, cheese, diced tomatoes, and diced onions.

Add Some of Your Baked Goods Recipes

Powdered eggs are convenient to use when baking different treats, such as nut loaves of bread, homemade cakes, biscuits, and more. Whenever you have a recipe that calls for eggs, you can substitute traditional eggs with egg powder. As mentioned earlier, you do not even need to add water to the powder because the powder will mix with both the wet and dry ingredients to blend in your mixing bowl. Many bakers like using powdered eggs because there is less of a mess to deal with, and they do not have to worry so much about the possibility of getting eggshells in their food.

Bring Powdered Eggs With You on Camping Adventures

Powdered eggs will come in handy if you go on many camping adventures and like to cook while hanging out by the campfire. When you bring traditional eggs with you, there are always concerns about accidentally cracking the eggs or not having enough space to keep them cool. However, that is not something you would need to be concerned about when using powdered eggs. Save space and still enjoy some delicious egg treats when using powdered eggs while camping.

The Advantages of Buying and Using Powdered Eggs

There are several advantages of buying and using powdered eggs instead of buying traditional eggs that come in a carton. These are a few of the benefits you should know about:

Save money in the long run because the powdered eggs last such a long time, and a little bit goes a long way.

Bring the powdered eggs with you wherever you need to go, and never worry about refrigeration.

Make your eggs with ease by mixing the powder with other ingredients or adding water to the powder when creating scrambled eggs and other dishes.

Enjoy the same great taste that you love when it comes to eating eggs.

Avoid the mess that commonly occurs when cracking an egg over a bowl.

These are great for food storage – long storage life.

With advantages like these, it is easy to see why more people are choosing to use powdered eggs or fresh eggs.

No Stress Over an Unwanted Mess

You know how messy things can get when you crack an egg. The shells might fall into the liquid, and you could end up with egg yolk all over your hands. If these are things that annoy you the most about using eggs, you can eliminate the stress and mess by switching over to powdered eggs.

Store Your Powdered Eggs For Lengthy Periods

Another great thing about powdered eggs is that you can store them for such a long time. They are great for survivalists who like to keep a stockpile ready just in case of emergencies. Military personnel may find these them far more convenient to have access to than traditional eggs that are too fragile and take up more space.

Will the Powdered Eggs Taste Just as Good as Regular Eggs?

You may have concerns that powdered eggs will not taste the same as regular eggs, but you have nothing to worry about at all. The powdered eggs taste just as good as the eggs that come in a carton, but they have a much longer shelf life, making them more convenient to purchase for many people.

Whether you go camping a lot, travel to different places, work in the military, or want a mess-free way to prepare different meals, you can purchase and use the powdered egg. They are incredibly easy to find online. They also come in various size containers for your convenience.

The Best Brands to Try

DIY Powders to Make at Home

How to Make Celery Powder

How to Make and Use Mushroom Powder

Making Tomato Powder

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Review: powdered scrambled eggs from Augason Farms

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, we’ve heard from a lot of folks who’ve stocked up on powdered foods. It’s a comfort to know you won’t go hungry if you can’t leave your house for a while. But how can you know if your family will eat the food you’ve been stocking up on? What if your toddler refuses the powdered staples you’ve bought in bulk?

We haven’t gone to a store in three months, and in that time I’ve tormented my family with rancid powdered sour cream and powdered whole eggs that smelled and tasted like drywall. Still, I haven’t given up on powdered food. On a whim, and against my better judgement, I ordered a can of Augason Farms Scrambled Egg Mix, as it was on sale for $20, but retails for $35.99.

Here’s what you need to know:

Out of all the powdered foods we’ve tried, the Augason Farms scrambled eggs are by far the best .

. That said, powdered food isn’t great .

. It’s always best to try powdered foods before stocking up.

Just in case you (like us) have found yourself with an overwhelming supply of powdered eggs, we spoke to the pros to get a recipe to make them edible. (Spoiler alert: chefs recommend adding lots of spices.)

Augason Farms boasts that a sealed can of its scrambled egg powder can sit on the shelf for 10 years, and up to a year after the can has been opened.

Augason Farms Scrambled Egg Powder These powdered scrambled eggs are the only ones we’ve tried that we can recommend. Make sure to try the recipe we’ve shared and add a lot of spices.

More: Best MRE (Meal Ready to Eat)

First test of Augason Farms scrambled eggs

I was hopeful because Augason Farms is a well-known supplier of survival foods. So I cracked open the can and… it actually smelled pretty good. Not at all like drywall spackle, and a bit sweet.

The instructions call for a 1:1 mix of water to egg powder. ¼ cup of egg powder and ¼ cup of warm water equals two eggs. So I mixed it up and whisked it smooth. The resulting liquid looked and smelled pretty close to a couple of scrambled eggs.

I cooked it in my cast iron pan with a bit of lard. Just like the American Family Supply whole eggs, the Augason Farms scrambled eggs cooked quickly even at low heat.

The result? Actually edible. Not much in terms of weird smell or taste. They didn’t taste exactly like regular scrambled eggs, but they were okay. My two sons, who love eggs, even ate a few of them.

Round 2: Two steps forward and one step back

Huge success, or so I thought. I slapped the lid on and put it in the cabinet, as there were no special storage instructions on the can.

A week later, my oldest son wanted some scrambled eggs, so I thought it’d be an interesting experiment to whip up some of the powdered ones and see if he’d notice. What are children for if not blind taste tests? This time, however, I microwaved the eggs instead of scrambling them in a skillet. If you’ve never done this, spray a mug with non-stick spray, scramble your eggs in the mug, and then microwave for 20-30 seconds. Pull out the mug, scramble again, and microwave for a shorter length of time. Repeat until done.

The result? He barely touched them, and complained that they tasted “sour.” They weren’t sour when I tried them, but they did taste a little ‘off.’ So I did what any good dad would do: I foisted them off on the baby. Not only did he not touch the eggs, he fell asleep in his high chair. Quite the critique from the little one.

The bottom line for this taste test: the microwave is not an ideal cooking method for these eggs.

Round 3: Going for the gusto

Was the bad second showing due to the fact that I microwaved them? I regretfully decided to try again. I mixed up yet another batch of powdered eggs and scrambled them in a lard-infused cast-iron pan. This time, I tried going for a softer scramble, frequently stirring the eggs as they cooked. The flavor was better, but the texture was like powdered mush. Blech.

So I tried yet another batch of powdered eggs. This time I pulled out all the stops:

I blended the mixture with a stick blender. That actually didn’t work very well, so I had to finish whisking with a fork.

I used warm, raw milk instead of water.

I added a pinch of Lowry’s Seasoning Salt to the mixture. I usually don’t add salt to eggs until they’ve firmed up a bit, but powdered eggs don’t play by the same rules as fresh ones.

I used butter in the pan instead of lard.

I cooked the eggs thoroughly to reduce the mushy texture. This is another area where powdered eggs deviate from fresh eggs. When cooking fresh eggs, you want to remove them from the heat when they’re still a little wet.

The results were much better. While the flavor wasn’t the same as fresh eggs, it was acceptable. The texture was better, too. My son even ate some and gave them a thumbs up. However, with the use of fresh milk and butter, it felt like a bit of a cheat. In search of more tips that wouldn’t require me to use fresh products, I put out a call to professionals.

“You want to get as much air into the mix as possible so you end up with fluffy eggs. Blend for 2-3 minutes minimum. The mix might seem runny, not like “normal” egg, but that’s the secret. If you mix them too dry, you end up with a gluggy egg. If you like your eggs more creamy, add a tablespoon or two of powdered milk to the mix before cooking,” said Elle Meager, founder of Outdoor Happens.

James Kilpatrick of Beanie Coffee seconded the advice to add plenty of air to the eggs. He also suggested adding extras like peppers and spices, and cooking the eggs until they’re dry, the latter of which I had found true in my testing.

It really seems like the trick to making these eggs edible is to toss in as many spices as possible to mask the flavor, which is something I heard repeatedly from experts in the field.

So I decided on one more batch with the tips I’d learned and no perishables. The results? The eggs were actually good! My son complained that they were too “spicy,” but my wife, who hates eggs in general and really hates being a guinea pig for my powdered egg experiments gave her approval.

A recipe for good powdered scrambled eggs

After some experimenting in America’s Test Survival Kitchen (OK, my kitchen), I discovered a winning formula for powdered scrambled eggs.

Ingredients

1/4 cup Augason Farms Scrambled Egg Mix

1/2 cup water

1/4 tsp Lowry’s Seasoning Salt

Fresh cracked pepper, to taste

Two drops of hot sauce, or more to taste

1/4 tsp onion powder (it’s strong stuff, don’t go crazy here)

1/2 tsp powdered milk (optional, but recommended)

1/2 tbsp lard (you can use any oil, but lard has a long shelf life and plenty of protein)

Directions

Heat a cast-iron or nonstick skillet over medium-low heat.

While the pan heats, add the ingredients (except lard) to a mixing cup or bowl.

Whisk the mixture thoroughly, ideally with a stick blender or hand mixer with a whisk attachment. You want to whisk until you see bubbles in the mixture.

Add the lard to the skillet and distribute evenly as it melts.

Pour the egg mixture into the pan. Don’t bother scraping out any leftover clumps, you only want to cook the smooth mixture.

Stir the eggs regularly with a spatula or wooden spoon. If the eggs seem to be cooking too fast, take them off the heat for a bit.

When the eggs start to look dry and crumbly, remove from the heat and plate them.

When cooked properly, powdered scrambled eggs won’t be as pretty as fresh eggs. If you try to plate them when they’re still a bit wet, you’re going to find yourself biting into wet powder. The more you cook them without burning them, the better.

Are Augason’s eggs worth your money and trouble?

I managed to make these eggs edible, but for all the money I’ve spent on powdered eggs, I could have bought a great deal of dry rice and beans that, while bland, have a long shelf life and no off flavors.

I think that concludes my experiments with powdered foods. These were by far the best that we’ve tried, and even then they’re pretty bad, at least unless you add a lot of seasoning. Maybe we’re just snobs, but had no problem scarfing down the 4Patriots survival foods. If you need eggs in a STHF situation, I recommend keeping chickens or making friends with people who do.

Baking Ingredients

Origin

Whole egg powder is obtained from the spray dehydration of liquid fresh eggs and the first known process was patented in the US in 1889 by Charles La Mont.1

In the early 1900s, a belt drying method was developed in China to meet the growing demand for egg powder. Commercial egg drying in the US began in the 1930s and has expanded since then. Today, whole egg powder, egg white powder and egg yolk powder are available nationwide and present a long shelf life alternative product to fresh eggs for the production of a variety of food products. 1

Function2

In baked products, eggs perform many functions including:1

Binding: this property is essential for baked goods texture building.

Emulsification: is mainly due to the presence of lecithin, an effective natural emulsifier.

Aeration: eggs produce stable foams when whipped to provide volume build up, lightness and smooth mouthfeel. This is especially important for sponge cakes, genoise and angel cakes.

Color and flavor: In baked goods, eggs provide a desirable yellow color, characteristic of the yolk carotenoids. Egg proteins also participate in Maillard reactions responsible for desirable flavor and crust browning.

Other attributes include their effect on reduced staling, enhanced moistness and surface shine (egg wash).

Nutrition

Whole egg powder nutritional value per 100 g:3

Component Grams Protein 55.50 Carbohydrate 21.80 Lipid 13.00 Ash 5.84 Water 3.86

Whole egg powder provides 444 kcal per 100 g. Eggs are an excellent source of high-quality protein. Also, they are a good source of vitamins, minerals, omega-3 fatty acids, carotenoids and other antioxidants.1,3

Commercial production

Whole egg powder can be manufactured through the following process:2

Cleaning: whole fresh eggs are cleaned before processing Cracking: whole eggs are cracked and the liquid is homogenized Precooling Filtration: the homogeneous liquid is filtered to remove potential impurities (eggshells) Storage: the liquid is stored in buffer tanks for further processing Desugarization: glucose is removed from liquid whole eggs via bacterial or yeast fermentation to avoid undesirable off-flavors and colors Pasteurization: desugared liquid is pasteurized at a temperature of 60 oC (140 oF) for 3.5 minutes to reduce the Salmonella counts to an acceptable level Drying: liquid eggs are spray-dried with hot air at a temperature of 110 – 125 oC (230 – 257 oF) Packaging: the resulting dried whole egg powder is packed and stored for transportation

Application

Whole egg powder can be used to substitute fresh eggs in several baked goods with good results. When using powdered eggs consider the following:1,2

Powdered eggs should be added with other dry ingredients. So, adjust water content accordingly in the formulation.

Powdered eggs should be reconstituted with appropriate amounts of cold water. For better hydration, the reconstituted liquid should be allowed to stand for 1-3 hours prior to usage.

A recommended substitution formula for fresh eggs with whole egg powder is:

100 g of fresh eggs = 26 g of whole egg powder + 74 g of water

Regulations

Whole egg powder is considered GRAS by the FDA when following good manufacturing practices. Some specifications should be met before drying whole fresh liquid eggs and the use of anticaking agents (silicon dioxide at maximum level of 1%) is permitted.4

In the EU, whole eggs (fresh or dried) are regulated by the EU Commission Regulation No 1308/2013.5

References

Good Powdered Eggs

Pin it!

My first experience with powdered eggs came when I was in Scouts and we did a week-long canoe trip. Our scrambled egg breakfast was less than inspiring — but we were hungry and ate it anyway. And when Dave and I began cruising, I bought a package of powdered eggs as backup. They “worked” in baking, but again I wasn’t thrilled with the results.

Guess what? You can now get REALLY GOOD powdered eggs — or actually, they are crystallized eggs. Thanks to reader Sue McDaniel on s/v Happy Dance, currently in Mexico, having come from Alaska (see their blog) for telling me about these. The brand is OvaEasy and you simply mix the powder with water and you can use it immediately just as you would a whole egg (you can also get it as whites-only). About the only thing you can’t do with it is have a fried egg or boiled egg!

Need More Help? Whether you have no refrigerator or a tiny one, the information in The Boat Galley Guide to Storing Food without Refrigeration (229 pages) lets you have great meals, using fresh food, on your next camping or boating adventure. Instead of spending a fortune on freeze-dried meals in a bag, spend just $12 and have fresh fruit and vegetables, meat, milk, eggs, cheese, sour cream and everything else you need for delicious, satisfying meals. Learn more.

Said Sue, “. . . an awesome product that a fellow cruiser introduced us to. It’s a crystallized egg and is amazing! The eggs come in powdered form, you just add water, and the shelf life is very long. And they taste and cook just like real eggs. Anyway, I thought you might like to give them a try. We love having them onboard as it certainly makes carrying eggs on long passages MUCH easier!”

And it’s not just Sue and I that think they taste just like real eggs — the reviews on Amazon are almost all raves. They work well in baking and taste great even for omelets and scrambled eggs.

You can get them in pouches that contain the equivalent of a dozen eggs, in large pouches with just over 6 dozen eggs and in large cans sold in 2-packs for a total of 12 dozen eggs. In the typical humidity of a boat, I recommend putting even unopened pouches into at least a Ziploc bag or, better yet, a Lock & Lock-type airtight plastic container. These don’t seem to absorb moisture quickly but my experience is that anything packed in foil pouches does pick up some moisture over time.

Okay, these aren’t cheap, costing over 50¢ an egg. You can get cheaper powdered eggs — but you’re probably not going to want to eat them. And they have a number of advantages:

Need no refrigeration, even after the package is opened.

Can make up the exact number of eggs you need at a time.

Lightweight.

Compact — even if you are somewhere that you can get never-refrigerated eggs, you might prefer these on long passages just because they take so much less space.

Long shelf life — two years or more.

No broken eggs!

You can get OvaEasy from Amazon and on the company site (no international shipping). As far as I know, they’re only sold online.

Read Next

Our FREE Provisioning Spreadsheet Wondering how much of what foods to take on your next trip? Know just how much to buy of what — all arranged by grocery store aisle — with our handy Provisioning Spreadsheet. Includes detailed instructions to edit it for your favorite foods, how much your family eats, and how long you’ll be gone. No spreadsheet skills needed! It’s FREE — get it here.

Cooking With My Food Storage: Perfect Scrambled Eggs Made From Powdered Eggs

Recently I was cooking with some and someone asked how many tablespoons were in a cup. I shouted out “sixteen.” We got to talking an…

Review: powdered scrambled eggs from Augason Farms

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, we’ve heard from a lot of folks who’ve stocked up on powdered foods. It’s a comfort to know you won’t go hungry if you can’t leave your house for a while. But how can you know if your family will eat the food you’ve been stocking up on? What if your toddler refuses the powdered staples you’ve bought in bulk?

We haven’t gone to a store in three months, and in that time I’ve tormented my family with rancid powdered sour cream and powdered whole eggs that smelled and tasted like drywall. Still, I haven’t given up on powdered food. On a whim, and against my better judgement, I ordered a can of Augason Farms Scrambled Egg Mix, as it was on sale for $20, but retails for $35.99.

Here’s what you need to know:

Out of all the powdered foods we’ve tried, the Augason Farms scrambled eggs are by far the best .

. That said, powdered food isn’t great .

. It’s always best to try powdered foods before stocking up.

Just in case you (like us) have found yourself with an overwhelming supply of powdered eggs, we spoke to the pros to get a recipe to make them edible. (Spoiler alert: chefs recommend adding lots of spices.)

Augason Farms boasts that a sealed can of its scrambled egg powder can sit on the shelf for 10 years, and up to a year after the can has been opened.

Augason Farms Scrambled Egg Powder These powdered scrambled eggs are the only ones we’ve tried that we can recommend. Make sure to try the recipe we’ve shared and add a lot of spices.

More: Best MRE (Meal Ready to Eat)

First test of Augason Farms scrambled eggs

I was hopeful because Augason Farms is a well-known supplier of survival foods. So I cracked open the can and… it actually smelled pretty good. Not at all like drywall spackle, and a bit sweet.

The instructions call for a 1:1 mix of water to egg powder. ¼ cup of egg powder and ¼ cup of warm water equals two eggs. So I mixed it up and whisked it smooth. The resulting liquid looked and smelled pretty close to a couple of scrambled eggs.

I cooked it in my cast iron pan with a bit of lard. Just like the American Family Supply whole eggs, the Augason Farms scrambled eggs cooked quickly even at low heat.

The result? Actually edible. Not much in terms of weird smell or taste. They didn’t taste exactly like regular scrambled eggs, but they were okay. My two sons, who love eggs, even ate a few of them.

Round 2: Two steps forward and one step back

Huge success, or so I thought. I slapped the lid on and put it in the cabinet, as there were no special storage instructions on the can.

A week later, my oldest son wanted some scrambled eggs, so I thought it’d be an interesting experiment to whip up some of the powdered ones and see if he’d notice. What are children for if not blind taste tests? This time, however, I microwaved the eggs instead of scrambling them in a skillet. If you’ve never done this, spray a mug with non-stick spray, scramble your eggs in the mug, and then microwave for 20-30 seconds. Pull out the mug, scramble again, and microwave for a shorter length of time. Repeat until done.

The result? He barely touched them, and complained that they tasted “sour.” They weren’t sour when I tried them, but they did taste a little ‘off.’ So I did what any good dad would do: I foisted them off on the baby. Not only did he not touch the eggs, he fell asleep in his high chair. Quite the critique from the little one.

The bottom line for this taste test: the microwave is not an ideal cooking method for these eggs.

Round 3: Going for the gusto

Was the bad second showing due to the fact that I microwaved them? I regretfully decided to try again. I mixed up yet another batch of powdered eggs and scrambled them in a lard-infused cast-iron pan. This time, I tried going for a softer scramble, frequently stirring the eggs as they cooked. The flavor was better, but the texture was like powdered mush. Blech.

So I tried yet another batch of powdered eggs. This time I pulled out all the stops:

I blended the mixture with a stick blender. That actually didn’t work very well, so I had to finish whisking with a fork.

I used warm, raw milk instead of water.

I added a pinch of Lowry’s Seasoning Salt to the mixture. I usually don’t add salt to eggs until they’ve firmed up a bit, but powdered eggs don’t play by the same rules as fresh ones.

I used butter in the pan instead of lard.

I cooked the eggs thoroughly to reduce the mushy texture. This is another area where powdered eggs deviate from fresh eggs. When cooking fresh eggs, you want to remove them from the heat when they’re still a little wet.

The results were much better. While the flavor wasn’t the same as fresh eggs, it was acceptable. The texture was better, too. My son even ate some and gave them a thumbs up. However, with the use of fresh milk and butter, it felt like a bit of a cheat. In search of more tips that wouldn’t require me to use fresh products, I put out a call to professionals.

“You want to get as much air into the mix as possible so you end up with fluffy eggs. Blend for 2-3 minutes minimum. The mix might seem runny, not like “normal” egg, but that’s the secret. If you mix them too dry, you end up with a gluggy egg. If you like your eggs more creamy, add a tablespoon or two of powdered milk to the mix before cooking,” said Elle Meager, founder of Outdoor Happens.

James Kilpatrick of Beanie Coffee seconded the advice to add plenty of air to the eggs. He also suggested adding extras like peppers and spices, and cooking the eggs until they’re dry, the latter of which I had found true in my testing.

It really seems like the trick to making these eggs edible is to toss in as many spices as possible to mask the flavor, which is something I heard repeatedly from experts in the field.

So I decided on one more batch with the tips I’d learned and no perishables. The results? The eggs were actually good! My son complained that they were too “spicy,” but my wife, who hates eggs in general and really hates being a guinea pig for my powdered egg experiments gave her approval.

A recipe for good powdered scrambled eggs

After some experimenting in America’s Test Survival Kitchen (OK, my kitchen), I discovered a winning formula for powdered scrambled eggs.

Ingredients

1/4 cup Augason Farms Scrambled Egg Mix

1/2 cup water

1/4 tsp Lowry’s Seasoning Salt

Fresh cracked pepper, to taste

Two drops of hot sauce, or more to taste

1/4 tsp onion powder (it’s strong stuff, don’t go crazy here)

1/2 tsp powdered milk (optional, but recommended)

1/2 tbsp lard (you can use any oil, but lard has a long shelf life and plenty of protein)

Directions

Heat a cast-iron or nonstick skillet over medium-low heat.

While the pan heats, add the ingredients (except lard) to a mixing cup or bowl.

Whisk the mixture thoroughly, ideally with a stick blender or hand mixer with a whisk attachment. You want to whisk until you see bubbles in the mixture.

Add the lard to the skillet and distribute evenly as it melts.

Pour the egg mixture into the pan. Don’t bother scraping out any leftover clumps, you only want to cook the smooth mixture.

Stir the eggs regularly with a spatula or wooden spoon. If the eggs seem to be cooking too fast, take them off the heat for a bit.

When the eggs start to look dry and crumbly, remove from the heat and plate them.

When cooked properly, powdered scrambled eggs won’t be as pretty as fresh eggs. If you try to plate them when they’re still a bit wet, you’re going to find yourself biting into wet powder. The more you cook them without burning them, the better.

Are Augason’s eggs worth your money and trouble?

I managed to make these eggs edible, but for all the money I’ve spent on powdered eggs, I could have bought a great deal of dry rice and beans that, while bland, have a long shelf life and no off flavors.

I think that concludes my experiments with powdered foods. These were by far the best that we’ve tried, and even then they’re pretty bad, at least unless you add a lot of seasoning. Maybe we’re just snobs, but had no problem scarfing down the 4Patriots survival foods. If you need eggs in a STHF situation, I recommend keeping chickens or making friends with people who do.

How to Use Powdered Eggs in Everyday Cooking

How to Use Powdered Eggs in Everyday Cooking

Have you ever tried using powdered or crystallized eggs in your recipes? Well, I have, and I was surprised that they actually taste good – like real eggs!

One of my favorite things about powdered eggs is that you always have eggs when you’re ready to cook. No more borrowing from the neighbor or running to the store when you’re halfway through a recipe only to find that you don’t have enough eggs.

Dehydrated eggs can come in different forms, so let’s see what the difference is.

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What are Powdered Eggs?

Whole egg powder is just that – whole eggs that have been dehydrated – some are freeze-dried. Their consistency and texture are similar to powdered milk.

You can buy whole eggs, just the yolks, just the whites, or already scrambled in powdered form.

They can be purchased in pouch sizes or #10 cans ( approximately 94 eggs) which makes them perfect for food storage.

Advantages of Powdered Eggs

There are several advantages of powdered eggs over fresh eggs.

With proper storage conditions (cool, dark, dry), dried eggs should ideally be rotated every 3 years. Although some claim to have used powdered eggs that were 10 years old.

It is not necessary to store the eggs in the refrigerator, but, as mentioned, store in a cool, dark area.

Eggs that have been dried require much less storage space. This means substantial supplies of eggs can be kept on hand in a relatively small space.

Re-hydrating the eggs for use in omelets and to make scrambled eggs require nothing other than the addition of a liquid, usually water or milk.

In powdered form, the eggs can be added to baked recipes without the need to mix them with a liquid ahead of time.

How to Use Powdered Eggs

Whole eggs can be used in recipes where whole eggs are called for. Powdered egg whites can be whipped into meringue for lemon pies or angel food cakes.

Here’s how to convert them to regular eggs: 1 Tablespoon egg powder + 2 Tablespoons water for a medium egg

2 Tablespoons egg powder + 1/4 Cup water for an extra large egg (Remember that there are 16 Tablespoons in 1 Cup to make multiple egg conversion easier)

When baking you do not need to re-hydrate the eggs before adding to your mix, simply add the needed egg powder and needed water to your mix and proceed as your recipe outlines.

If you need to half a recipe, you can half an egg with the powdered mix.

Recipes for Using Powdered Eggs

Never run out of eggs again! The cans come with an average equivalent of 72-96 eggs (depending on the brand).

Swedish Pancakes An easy recipe for using your powdered eggs in breakfast foods. 3 T. powdered eggs

6 T. water

1 cup powdered milk

3 cups warm water

4 T. melted butter-flavored shortening or oil (or real butter)

2 T. sugar

1-1/2 tsp. salt

1-1/2 cups whole wheat flour Put water and powdered egg mix in a bowl and whisk until well blended. Add dry milk, warm water, melted shortening/oil/butter, sugar and salt. Then add the flour, continuing to whisk until batter is smooth. Let sit for 5 minutes and mix again. Melt 1 teaspoon shortening or oil in a hot pan. Pour 1/2 cup batter into the middle, tilting the pan or griddle to form about an 8-inch circle. Cook until batter sets and edges start to brown a little. Flip carefully and cook other side. Serve at once with syrup or other toppings.

Yields: 4 Servings [T = Tablespoons] [tsp = teaspoons] [C = cup]

Here’s another delicious recipe to use your powdered eggs:

French Toast with Orange Syrup

3 Eggs (3 T. dehydrated eggs + 1/3 C. Water)

1 C. Milk (3T. Milk + 1 C. Water)

2 T. Sugar

1/4 tsp. Salt

1/8 tsp. Ground Cinnamon

1/8 tsp. Ground Nutmeg

8 slices day-old French Bread, 1 inch thick (or whole wheat bread for more nutrition)

Orange Syrup

1/2 C. Orange Juice

1/3 . Corn Syrup

1/4 C. Sugar

4 tsp. Butter

1 tsp. Grated Orange Peel

1/2 t. Orange Extract Directions:

1) In a bowl, beat eggs. Beat in the milk, sugar, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Soak the slices of bread for 30 seconds on each side. Cook on a hot greased griddle until golden brown on both sides and cooked through.

2) Meanwhile, in a saucepan, combine the orange juice, corn syrup, sugar, butter and orange peel. Bring to a boil and boil for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from the heat; stir in extract. Serve over French toast. Yields: 4 servings

Download FREE Breakfast Ideas for more great recipes using powdered eggs. Tuck away in your food storage recipe file and feel free to pass along to others.

Powdered eggs

Fully dehydrated eggs

Pure dried whole eggs from the U.S.

A powdered egg is a fully dehydrated egg. Most powdered eggs are made using spray drying in the same way that powdered milk is made. The major advantages of powdered eggs over fresh eggs are the reduced weight per volume of whole egg equivalent and the shelf life. Other advantages include smaller usage of storage space, and lack of need for refrigeration. Powdered eggs can be used without rehydration when baking, and can be rehydrated to make dishes such as scrambled eggs and omelettes.

History [ edit ]

LaMont’s Crystallized Eggs 1898 ad in Seattle , Washington

Dehydrated eggs advertisements appeared in the late 1890’s in the United States.[1] Powdered eggs appear in literature as a staple of camp cooking at least as early as 1912.[2]

Powdered eggs were used in the United Kingdom during World War II for rationing. Powdered eggs are also known as dried eggs, and colloquially during the period of rationing in the UK, as Ersatz eggs.

The modern method of manufacturing powdered eggs was developed in the 1930s by Albert Grant and Co. of the Mile End Road, London. The cake manufacturer was importing liquid egg from China and one of his staff realised that this was 75% water. An experimental freeze-drying plant was built and tried. Then a factory was set up in Singapore to process Chinese egg.[clarification needed] As war approached, Grant transferred his dried egg facility to Argentina. The British Government lifted the patent[which?] during the war and many other suppliers came into the market notably in the United States. Early importers to the United States included Vic Henningsen Sr. and others in the United Kingdom.

Quality [ edit ]

Powdered eggs have a storage life of 5 to 10 years when stored without oxygen in a cool storage environment.[3]

The process of spray-drying eggs so as to make powdered eggs oxidizes the cholesterol, which has been shown to be helpful at reducing aortic atherosclerosis in animal trials.[4]

See also [ edit ]

THRIVE Scrambled Egg Mix vs Whole Egg Powder

THRIVE Scrambled Egg Mix vs Whole Egg Powder

Powdered Eggs in Baking

I’ve been using Whole Egg Powder in my baking for years! It works perfectly in my cookies, yeast breads, and cakes. Whole powdered eggs cost just over $1 dozen so I actually use them exclusively in baking as they save me money over using fresh eggs from the grocery store.

For those of you scared to try them, I would highly suggest that you give it a shot in your baking! I really think you will be pleasantly surprised! I actually owned whole powdered eggs for about 2 years before I got up the courage to try them. They just sat in my freezer (they keep longer there) staring at me each and every day. Finally, one day I was out of eggs and had to make a dessert for a church function: a cake actually. I had 3 kids 2 yrs old and under at the time and they were all sleeping. I did not want to wake everyone to head to the grocery store. So, I decided to be brave, say a little prayer and use my powdered eggs. The cake turned out great! I thought: “Well, maybe that is just because it was for a church function and God needed them to turn out. I’m sure powdered eggs would ruin my favorite cookie recipe!” So, I made a batch of cookies with them the next day and they were perfect! And the best party: I could eat the cookie dough b/c there were no raw eggs!

One quick tip:

Make sure that if a recipe calls for 1 large egg, that you use 1 large powdered egg. For example, with the THRIVE Whole Egg Powder, 1 T powder + 2 T water = 1 medium egg. If you use just one T. powder, you won’t have enough egg! So, use a heaping T. instead. Other brands may be similar.

Scrambled Eggs

Unfortunately, as much as I loved whole powdered eggs in baking, I could never honestly say that whole powdered eggs made great scrambled eggs. People would ask me all the time and I had to respond: “Well, they are edible. Better than other brands I’ve tried and are a bit better when you add some milk.” But I just couldn’t give them a full-fledged thumbs up!

Enter THRIVE Scrambled Egg Mix! This is a new product that THRIVE Life (formerly Shelf Reliance) introduced at the convention and I was intrigued. Could powdered eggs really taste good when used to make scrambled eggs? Really? I decided to give them a shot.

The Powders:

I made four batches of scrambled eggs with the scrambled egg mix, whole powdered eggs, and instant milk. I know that I like to add milk to my fresh scrambled eggs and that always improved the taste of scrambled eggs made with the whole egg powder in the past so I thought I’d give it a try. So, 2 T. of each type of egg on the left and 2 T of the egg plus 1 T. milk on the right. As you can see, the scrambled egg mix is much darker in color. The Whole Eggs were a much finer powder:

Mixing them up:

I added 4 T. water to each one and whisked them up. It took quite a while to really “whisk” the whole powdered eggs, but the scrambled eggs mix dissolved almost instantly!

Cooking them:

Then I cooked them up. The only difference here was that the Whole eggs were a bit more difficult to keep from sticking to the pan. But you can hopefully also notice a difference in color and texture once cooked. The whole eggs were more of an “off” color, a bit more “crumbly” and not nearly as fluffy as the scrambled egg mix.

The Taste Test:

And the final test was the taste test! I ate some of each and had my kids try some of each. Hands down, the Thrive Scrambled Egg mix won! And it was better without the milk! The eggs were the right texture and taste for scrambled eggs! Amazing!

Most Importantly:

One very important thing you should know about THRIVE’s Scrambled Egg mix:

It contains no ingredients other than eggs!

Seriously! No preservatives, no additives at all!

Other Mixes:

Here is a list of ingredients I found in some other scrambled eggs mixes available on the market:

milk

soybean oil

modified food starch

salt

xanthan gum

citric acid

butter flavor

maltodextrin

annatto

turmeric

vegetable oil

corn oil

color

THRIVE:

Here is the ingredient list on from the THRIVE Scrambled Egg Mix label:

Whole Eggs

Yolk

Dried Egg Whites

Incredible! You can find THRIVE Scrambled Eggs here. And to be completely transparent, yes, I earn a small commission if you purchase them through that link, but that did not affect my review here at all. As is always true on this site, I won’t recommend something I would use myself! Read more about that here: Disclosure.

Pin It Now For Later!

Good Powdered Eggs

Pin it!

My first experience with powdered eggs came when I was in Scouts and we did a week-long canoe trip. Our scrambled egg breakfast was less than inspiring — but we were hungry and ate it anyway. And when Dave and I began cruising, I bought a package of powdered eggs as backup. They “worked” in baking, but again I wasn’t thrilled with the results.

Guess what? You can now get REALLY GOOD powdered eggs — or actually, they are crystallized eggs. Thanks to reader Sue McDaniel on s/v Happy Dance, currently in Mexico, having come from Alaska (see their blog) for telling me about these. The brand is OvaEasy and you simply mix the powder with water and you can use it immediately just as you would a whole egg (you can also get it as whites-only). About the only thing you can’t do with it is have a fried egg or boiled egg!

Need More Help? Whether you have no refrigerator or a tiny one, the information in The Boat Galley Guide to Storing Food without Refrigeration (229 pages) lets you have great meals, using fresh food, on your next camping or boating adventure. Instead of spending a fortune on freeze-dried meals in a bag, spend just $12 and have fresh fruit and vegetables, meat, milk, eggs, cheese, sour cream and everything else you need for delicious, satisfying meals. Learn more.

Said Sue, “. . . an awesome product that a fellow cruiser introduced us to. It’s a crystallized egg and is amazing! The eggs come in powdered form, you just add water, and the shelf life is very long. And they taste and cook just like real eggs. Anyway, I thought you might like to give them a try. We love having them onboard as it certainly makes carrying eggs on long passages MUCH easier!”

And it’s not just Sue and I that think they taste just like real eggs — the reviews on Amazon are almost all raves. They work well in baking and taste great even for omelets and scrambled eggs.

You can get them in pouches that contain the equivalent of a dozen eggs, in large pouches with just over 6 dozen eggs and in large cans sold in 2-packs for a total of 12 dozen eggs. In the typical humidity of a boat, I recommend putting even unopened pouches into at least a Ziploc bag or, better yet, a Lock & Lock-type airtight plastic container. These don’t seem to absorb moisture quickly but my experience is that anything packed in foil pouches does pick up some moisture over time.

Okay, these aren’t cheap, costing over 50¢ an egg. You can get cheaper powdered eggs — but you’re probably not going to want to eat them. And they have a number of advantages:

Need no refrigeration, even after the package is opened.

Can make up the exact number of eggs you need at a time.

Lightweight.

Compact — even if you are somewhere that you can get never-refrigerated eggs, you might prefer these on long passages just because they take so much less space.

Long shelf life — two years or more.

No broken eggs!

You can get OvaEasy from Amazon and on the company site (no international shipping). As far as I know, they’re only sold online.

Read Next

Our FREE Provisioning Spreadsheet Wondering how much of what foods to take on your next trip? Know just how much to buy of what — all arranged by grocery store aisle — with our handy Provisioning Spreadsheet. Includes detailed instructions to edit it for your favorite foods, how much your family eats, and how long you’ll be gone. No spreadsheet skills needed! It’s FREE — get it here.

How to Make Powdered Eggs Step by Step • New Life On A Homestead

If you’re a homesteader, preserving the foods you grow and harvest is very important. Preserved foods enable you to ensure you have enough supplies on hand during the winter, when your homestead will likely be less productive.

While food preservation techniques like root cellars, canning and smoking are popular options to store the food you harvest or hunt, another somewhat less common preserved food is powdered eggs.

If you have a flock of chickens, you can create a safe, high-protein preserved food that will last for years, is delicious, and is great for bartering with your neighbors and other homesteaders as well.

So, if you want to learn a traditional and very effective food preservation technique, this article will show you how to make your very own powdered eggs step by step!

Powdered Eggs, from Beloved Camp Food to World War II Staple

Powdered eggs, sometimes called dried eggs, have been in widespread use for well over a century. Because a container of powdered eggs is so light and compact, it became a very popular camp food.

Hunting lodges and fishing camps relied on foods like powdered eggs and beef jerky to keep their clients well fed while they were on excursions to the more remote parts of the United States.

Because they were so lightweight and packed with nutrients, it was not long before governments saw the utility of powdered eggs as well.

During the Second World War, when food was a critical commodity that governments controlled closely, powdered eggs were adapted widely. In the UK, dried eggs imported from the United States were distributed widely through the Ministry of Food’s ration systems, due in part to the shortage of fresh eggs.

While not as popular as fresh eggs from the farm, powdered eggs no doubt helped to keep the civilian population in the United Kingdom well-fed, so they could continue to fight the Axis Powers and win World War II.

In the years following the War, powdered eggs fell out of fashion. People were no doubt happy to be free of the ration system, and the end of the War years also coincided with the beginning of mass poultry production as well. Over the years, fresh eggs became mass-produced, inexpensive and widely available, and powdered eggs slowly faded into obscurity.

Now, however, homesteaders are continuing to discover old skills and crafts that have become lost or obscure, and putting them to work in the 21st Century. Interest in both homesteading as well as prepping have led many people to giving powdered eggs a second look; many people even buy powdered eggs in bulk now to ensure they have a ready supply of protein on hand at all times.

However, as easy as it is to order a can or bag of powdered eggs online, it is often more practical and satisfying to make them yourself.

So, maybe it is time to give powdered eggs a try on your homestead. After all, this preserved food is a great fit for economical, sustainable, and low-cost homestead living.

If you’re a prepper, powdered eggs are great to have on hand for emergencies or survival situations as well. Here are a few of the benefits of making and using powdered eggs.

While fresh eggs may be delicious, they don’t stay fresh for long. Powdered eggs on the other hand, when stored in airtight containers in cool storage areas, can last for years .

on the other hand, when stored in airtight containers in cool storage areas, . If your homestead is in a cold weather climate, your chickens may not lay prolifically throughout the winter; here in New England, even my hardiest cold weather hens slow down their egg laying considerably during the colder parts of the year. Making powdered eggs during the peak egg-laying months of summer will ensure you have a steady supply of eggs for your breakfast and baking needs all year long .

. Powdered eggs are also easier to store when space is an issue , or you are hiking and want to travel light. A dozen fresh eggs take up about 122 cubic inches of space; however, their powdered equivalent only requires about 22 cubic inches.

, or you are hiking and want to travel light. A dozen fresh eggs take up about 122 cubic inches of space; however, their powdered equivalent only requires about 22 cubic inches. The drying process , which we’ll discuss later, helps to kill bacteria that could have possibly contaminated eggs during handling and shipping.

, which we’ll discuss later, that could have possibly contaminated eggs during handling and shipping. Powdered eggs are also highly nutritious. A tablespoon of powdered eggs – the equivalent of one whole egg – contains over 5 grams of protein, and other essential vitamins and minerals as well.

So, now that you know a bit about the history and benefits of powdered eggs, let’s take a close look at how you can make them on your homestead.

Equipment and Ingredients

Making powdered eggs is surprisingly simple, but you will need some basic equipment, including:

Blender. Any standard blender will do; you’re only using the blender to mix your eggs and then ground the dried eggs into a fine powder, so it won’t get much of a workout! If you choose to do so, you can use a whisk and mixing bowl for both of these steps. However, a blender or food processor does a much more thorough job of mixing your raw eggs and rendering the dried eggs into a fine powder.

Any standard blender will do; you’re only using the blender to mix your eggs and then ground the dried eggs into a fine powder, so it won’t get much of a workout! If you choose to do so, you can use a whisk and mixing bowl for both of these steps. However, a blender or food processor does a much more thorough job of mixing your raw eggs and rendering the dried eggs into a fine powder. Dehydrator. You’ll need a dehydrator to actually dry your eggs. While you could use a standard oven to dry them, a dehydrator will be much more effective and consistent. Additionally, your dehydrator can do many other important and tasty food preservation tasks as well, so it is a good tool to have on a homestead. Your dehydrator will need solid trays for you to spread out your mixed raw eggs to draw upon; these are the same types of trays used to prepare fruit leather.

You’ll need a dehydrator to actually dry your eggs. While you could use a standard oven to dry them, a dehydrator will be much more effective and consistent. Additionally, your dehydrator can do many other important and tasty food preservation tasks as well, so it is a good tool to have on a homestead. Your dehydrator will need solid trays for you to spread out your mixed raw eggs to draw upon; these are the same types of trays used to prepare fruit leather. Large Mixing Bowl. You’ll need a large mixing bowl to transfer your eggs into after they’ve been dehydrated. Also, you’ll want to crack your eggs open into a bowl as well, so that you can easily remove any stray eggshells or other debris that happens to get mixed in with them.

You’ll need a large mixing bowl to transfer your eggs into after they’ve been dehydrated. Also, you’ll want to crack your eggs open into a bowl as well, so that you can easily remove any stray eggshells or other debris that happens to get mixed in with them. Storage. You’ll need something to store your powdered eggs once you make them. If you plan to consume them relatively quickly, then simple plastic locking bags or containers may suffice. However, if you intend to store your powdered eggs for months or years on end, you will need more sophisticated procedures to ensure they are packed airtight. We will discuss powdered egg storage options for your consideration later.

You’ll need something to store your powdered eggs once you make them. If you plan to consume them relatively quickly, then simple plastic locking bags or containers may suffice. However, if you intend to store your powdered eggs for months or years on end, you will need more sophisticated procedures to ensure they are packed airtight. We will discuss powdered egg storage options for your consideration later. Ladle or Spoon. You will use a ladle or spoon to carefully transfer your eggs from your blender on to your dehydrator trays.

You will use a ladle or spoon to carefully transfer your eggs from your blender on to your dehydrator trays. Eggs! Of course, in order to make powdered eggs, you’ll need fresh eggs to start with. This particular recipe calls for two dozen fresh eggs.

Print 5 from 4 votes Powdered Eggs Recipe Equipment Blender

Dehydrator

Large Mixing Bowl

Storage

Ladle or Spoon Ingredients Eggs Instructions Prepare Your Equipment. As always, you want to ensure the equipment you are going to use is as clean as possible; after all, you are working with a food product you are preparing for potentially long-term storage. Wash and sanitize your dehydrator, dehydrator trays, your blender, and any bowls or utensils you expect to use.

Prepare Your Eggs. Try to obtain the freshest eggs you can for this recipe. Ideally, you should gather your eggs from your homestead and prepare your powdered eggs as soon as possible. If you don’t have enough chickens to produce two dozen eggs quickly, get some more from a fellow farmer or homesteader, or buy some from a local store. Prior to proceeding to the next steps, wash any eggs you’ve gathered under warm water and wipe them off with a clean towel.

Cracking Your Eggs. Crack your eggs into a large mixing bowl, yolks and all. Take care not to get eggshells or other materials into the bowl. If you do, use a fork to carefully fish any debris out, working the material out along the side of the bowl. If you have a compost pile, you should collect up all of the eggshells, smash them up, and then add them to the pile. Once all two dozen of your eggs are in the mixing bowl, transfer them to your blender. Then, thoroughly wash and dry your mixing bowl, and set it aside for use later.

Mixing Your Eggs. Once your eggs are in the blender, blend them at medium speed for approximately two minutes. If you have a smaller blender, you may need to blend them in two separate batches, since the egg mixture fills with air and expands a bit as you blend it all together. Once your eggs are fully mixed, you will be ready to transfer them over to your dehydrator racks.

Transfer the Egg Mixture onto your Dehydrator Drying Racks. I use a magic mill dehydrator, and this recipe requires me to use three to four drying racks, depending on the size of my eggs. Set out your drying racks on a table or counter and move your blender alongside them. Using your ladle, carefully transfer your egg mixture from the blender to your drying trays, taking care not to spill any in the transfer or to overfill the trays. Once each tray is filled, load the racks into your dehydrator, taking care not to tip a tray and spill your egg mixture everywhere. Wash and dry your blender as soon as you are done transferring your mixture, you will need it to render your dried eggs into powder later on.

Dehydrate Your Egg Mixture.

Once you finish carefully loading the egg mixture into your dehydrator, it is time to start drying them out! Consult your dehydrator manual to determine exactly how long it takes to dehydrate your egg mixture. Here on our farm we use a Magic Mill dehydrator. I dry my egg mixture at a temperature of 149 degrees Fahrenheit in the dehydrator for approximately five to seven hours. However, each brand of dehydrator is considerably different, so consult your manual or talk to a trusted food preservation expert to determine the proper settings to properly dry out your eggs. After your egg mixture has dried for the proscribed time, remove and inspect them. If they are thoroughly dry, they should be slightly browned on top, cracked and brittle. If the eggs seem moist or soft, place them back into the dehydrator to dry some more. Once they are fully dried out, scrape your eggs off of each tray with a fork or butter knife carefully into your mixing bowl.

Rendering your Dried Eggs into Powder Once you’ve removed all of your dried eggs from your blender into your mixing bowl, load them all into your blender. Then, on a medium setting, blend the dried eggs until they are completely rendered into a fine powder. Once the blending is complete, you are ready to store or use your powdered eggs!

Packing and Storing Powdered Eggs

If you plan to use your powdered eggs relatively quickly, you can simply store them in a locking plastic bag in your refrigerator. However, if you intend to store powdered egg for months or years at a time, you should definitely take additional measures.

One great option to safely store your powdered eggs for the long term is to use a vacuum seal machine to pack your powdered eggs into an airtight plastic bag.

Once you have vacuum packed your eggs, store them in a cool dry place that is out of direct sunlight. Once you’ve opened any of your vacuum-packed powdered egg bags, ensure you store them in a refrigerator.

You can learn more about powdered eggs and food safety from the USDA website. Additionally, here is a great video that demonstrates how vacuum packing is used for food preservation and storage, especially for powdered goods:

Cooking with Powdered Eggs

Once you have plenty of powdered eggs on hand, you will be ready to start using them for breakfast and for recipes that call for eggs.

To cook your powdered eggs into scrambled eggs, one tablespoon of powder and two tablespoons of water approximates one egg. Simply mix the egg powder and water together, then add to a skillet and cook the mixture over medium heat for a plate of scrambled eggs.

Here is a video demonstrating how to cook reconstituted powdered eggs in a skillet:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MH3wE9diuo Video can’t be loaded because JavaScript is disabled: Powdered eggs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MH3wE9diuo)

You can also use your powdered eggs in lieu of fresh eggs for recipes requiring eggs, such as cake. Simply use the 1:2 powder to water ratio to add the appropriate amount of powder and water for any given recipe.

You DO NOT have to mix the egg powder and water prior to adding them to a given recipe, either. Simply add the proper amount of egg powder and water separately to a mixing bowl with the other ingredients the recipe calls for, so that you approximate the amount of eggs the recipe calls for.

Parting Thoughts

If you’re looking for innovative ways to preserve food on your homestead, you should definitely consider making powdered eggs. Powdered eggs are packed with protein and other nutrients and are easy to make and store. Plus, they are absolutely delicious as well. So, follow the directions here, and add some powdered eggs to your pantry today!

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