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Can You Use Burlap For Rug Hooking | Rug Hooking And Punch Needle Backing Beginners Tutorial: Linen, Monk’S Cloth, Burlap And Rug Warp The 128 New Answer

Are you looking for the topic “Can you use burlap for rug hooking – Rug Hooking and Punch Needle Backing Beginners Tutorial: Linen, Monk’s Cloth, Burlap and Rug Warp“? We answer all your questions at the website https://tw.taphoamini.com in category: Tw.taphoamini.com/photos. You will find the answer right below. The article written by the author Ribbon Candy Hooking has 1,175 views and 69 likes likes.

The craft of rug-hooking or -punching is centuries old, but it is growing in popularity today. Rug-hooking is simple to learn. Unlike many crafts it does not require a lot of supplies. Burlap or monk’s cloth is used for the backing material.Rug hooking today typically uses strips of wool of varying width (1/32 to 1/2 of an inch) that are pulled through a stiff woven backing (burlap, linen, or rug warp) with a tool (rug hook) to form loops. The rug hook often has a wooden handle to provide a more ergonomic grip to the hooker.Basically any yarn that is a worsted weight-bulky will work well for rug hooking, as long as it is not slippery. If you are looking at a label, any yarn that knits 3.5-4 knitted stitches per inch is great. Wool is just plain wonderful, but lots of other fibers hook up well, again, as long as they are not slippery.

11 Non-Skid Rug Backing Options for Knit, Crocheted and Woven Rugs
  1. Nonslip Rug Pad and Double-Sided Tape. Cut a nonslip rug pad 1″ smaller than your rug on all sides. …
  2. Anti-Slip Spray. …
  3. Shelf Liner and Adhesive-Backed Velcro. …
  4. Rug Fasteners. …
  5. Puff Paint. …
  6. Silicone Sealant. …
  7. Plastic Dip. …
  8. Fiber-Lok Non-Skid Backing.
Howto Make Your Own Burlap Bedroom Rug
  1. Wash your bag in cold water. Use fabric softener. Iron bag when nearly dry. Measure the circumference of your rug.
  2. In contrast colored fabric, cut a 3” strip. Pin fabric onto bag and sew a 1.25 “ hem all around.
  3. Iron edges for a flat finish.

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Rug Hooking and Punch Needle Backing Beginners Tutorial: Linen, Monk’s Cloth, Burlap and Rug Warp – Can you use burlap for rug hooking, details of this topic

In this video I talk about the different backings for rug hooking; burlap, linen, monks cloth, and rug warp. I talk about their various properties of each and what makes one better than the other in regard to its intended use.
#ribboncandyhooking #rughooking #rugs #hookedrugs #punchneedle #latchhook #howdoesithook

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What kind of backing fabric is best for rug hooking?

For rug hooking, we need an open-weave fabric, and the best ones are linen, burlap and monk’s cloth. Linen. Linen is the most durable backing …

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Source: judytaylor2013.wordpress.com

Date Published: 8/29/2021

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Rug Backing – Primitive Burlap 60″ W – 1 yard

We can teach you to hook rugs in five minutes! Any questions? We are just a phone call away. Please call us at. 1-800-328 …

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Source: hookingrugs.com

Date Published: 4/6/2021

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Burlap For Rug Hooking – HomeTex.ca

Even before burlap bags were available in the market, burlap was the standard backing fabric used for rug hooking. · Burlap backing benefits the customer in two …

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Source: hometex.ca

Date Published: 9/20/2022

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The skinny on burlap… – Encompassing Designs

When I first started rug hooking I was so allergic to the smell it … It was really only a pain if you were using black as a background as …

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Source: www.encompassingdesigns.com

Date Published: 11/22/2022

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Rug Hooking 101: A How to Guide for Beginner Rug Hookers

3. Hold your hook in the hand you use to hold your pencil, and the strip of wool in the other hand. Put your hook down through a hole …

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Source: hookingrugs.wordpress.com

Date Published: 11/10/2022

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7 Burlap rug hooking ideas – Pinterest

See more eas about rug hooking, burlap rug, rag rug. … Burlap rug hooking · Burlap is so popular right now so here’s a tip: How to Cut Burlap So.

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Source: www.pinterest.ca

Date Published: 12/3/2021

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Rug Hooking and Punch Needle Backing Beginners Tutorial: Linen, Monk's Cloth, Burlap and Rug Warp
Rug Hooking and Punch Needle Backing Beginners Tutorial: Linen, Monk’s Cloth, Burlap and Rug Warp

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  • Author: Ribbon Candy Hooking
  • Views: 1,175 views
  • Likes: 69 likes
  • Date Published: Jun 30, 2021
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hqxkpg6ccRo

What material do you use for rug hooking?

Rug hooking today typically uses strips of wool of varying width (1/32 to 1/2 of an inch) that are pulled through a stiff woven backing (burlap, linen, or rug warp) with a tool (rug hook) to form loops. The rug hook often has a wooden handle to provide a more ergonomic grip to the hooker.

What kind of yarn do you use for rug hooking?

Basically any yarn that is a worsted weight-bulky will work well for rug hooking, as long as it is not slippery. If you are looking at a label, any yarn that knits 3.5-4 knitted stitches per inch is great. Wool is just plain wonderful, but lots of other fibers hook up well, again, as long as they are not slippery.

What backing to use for rugs?

11 Non-Skid Rug Backing Options for Knit, Crocheted and Woven Rugs
  1. Nonslip Rug Pad and Double-Sided Tape. Cut a nonslip rug pad 1″ smaller than your rug on all sides. …
  2. Anti-Slip Spray. …
  3. Shelf Liner and Adhesive-Backed Velcro. …
  4. Rug Fasteners. …
  5. Puff Paint. …
  6. Silicone Sealant. …
  7. Plastic Dip. …
  8. Fiber-Lok Non-Skid Backing.

How do you make a burlap rug?

Howto Make Your Own Burlap Bedroom Rug
  1. Wash your bag in cold water. Use fabric softener. Iron bag when nearly dry. Measure the circumference of your rug.
  2. In contrast colored fabric, cut a 3” strip. Pin fabric onto bag and sew a 1.25 “ hem all around.
  3. Iron edges for a flat finish.

Is burlap the same as monks cloth?

The third type of fabric that is commonly used in rug hooking is called Monk’s Cloth, which is made with cotton. Cotton is washable, so it is much better than burlap in that regard, but the fibers will become brittle with wear, so it’s not the most durable fabric you can use.

What yarn is best for tufting?

What yarn should I use for tufting?
Pros
Acrylic yarn Cheap, synthetic and soft. Great for wall pieces.
Cotton yarn Moderately soft, has a medium hold. Although more expensive then acrylic, is easy to find in many colors, at a good price
Wool yarn Holds shape really well and has a natural dirt-resistance.

Can you use any yarn for latch hook?

There’s one big difference, however, between this project and those awesome 80s kits, and that difference is what makes getting back into latch hooking a terrifically eco-friendly activity: whereas latch hook kits almost universally use acrylic yarn, the latch hook creation that you make yourself, from a pattern that

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How thick is rug yarn?

Rug yarn refers to the types of yarn used to create rugs, including acrylic. Rug yarn is the name for several different things. First, it is the term used for a specific type of yarn, usually a thick, 3-ply yarn often chosen by crafters for making rugs, though 4-ply and 6-ply yarns also exist.

What can I use for backing tufting?

If you’re applying a backing to your piece, we recommend doing so using a contact adhesive, which creates a stronger bond than regular spray adhesive. Please note that the term primary adhesive refers to the adhesive you’ll use first, to adhere the yarn to the tufting cloth.

What is jute backing on a rug?

Woven from plant fibers, jute is a traditional upholstery webbing, often used for carpet backing. Jute is the most common type of natural fiber used in carpet backings. Made from plant fibers, woven jute is very soft, strong and durable.

How much jute do you need to make a rug?

First, to make this DIY jute rug, you’ll need about five rolls of thick dollar store jute rope, a large Q16 crochet hook, and an afternoon! Follow the step by step instructions in my rug tutorial below to create your own beautiful craft rug.

Materials, Tools & More

Rug Hooking

Rug Hooking Supplies

Rug hooking is the craft of creating rugs by pulling loops of fabric or yarn through a woven backing. A hook is used to pull these loops through, thus the name, “rug hooking”. There is evidence of rug hooking techniques in rag rugs made by the Vikings. It is believed that rug hooking as a popular home art’s origin is in the 19th century. Weaving mills had byproducts called thrums (a piece of yarn about 9 inches long) that were basically leftovers from the process. The workers at these mills would take these thrums home and put them to use by pulling them through a backing to create rugs. Rug hooking in North America evolved from the home trend of machine made carpets becoming popular around 1930. Poor women created carpets of their own by going through their fabric scraps and creating strips out o the scraps to use as the hooking material. Burlap was a popular backing during this time because it was often free as people would have burlap bags of feed and grain available to them.

Rug hooking today typically uses strips of wool of varying width (1/32 to 1/2 of an inch) that are pulled through a stiff woven backing (burlap, linen, or rug warp) with a tool (rug hook) to form loops. The rug hook often has a wooden handle to provide a more ergonomic grip to the hooker.

Variations in color and shading are accomplished with both patterns in the fabric strips used (solids, plaids, herringbone, etc.) and / or variations in the coloring of the wool yarn (overdyeing, dip dyeing, etc.)

The two broadest classifications are fine rug hooking (typically utilizing wool strips less than 5/32 of an inch wide) and primitive rug hooking (typically utilizing wool strips up to ½ of an inch wide). Fine hooking can create detailed intricate designs due to the smaller working material. The wide-cut hooking designs are often less detailed and modeled after vintage designs.

In recent decades, rug hookers have been exploring new materials and new techniques. This experimentation (combined with knowledge and respect for the past) has allowed rug hooking to evolve and grow into an exciting and creative form of art. Hooked rugs are a great way to utilize your creativity but also add a useful piece of art to your home. We are excited to be a part of this fun and social craft.

View our selection of rug hooking supplies, materials, tools and more!

Read our guide here!

What you need to start rug hooking:

Nice to have: cutting machine with various cutter heads and punch needles.

If you don’t find exactly what you want, or would like a product recommendation, please call the shop directly at 800-441-9665 or contact us for assistance.

What yarns work best for rug hooking?

As of January 2020, Hooking With Yarn has moved and has a new name, Rug Hooking Adventures. Same monthly posting, with tips & techniques, Featured Rug of the Month, web specials and more (just no more pesky ads!). Click here to sign up for the new blog. Thanks!

What yarns work best for rug hooking?

Basically any yarn that is a worsted weight-bulky will work well for rug hooking, as long as it is not slippery. If you are looking at a label, any yarn that knits 3.5-4 knitted stitches per inch is great. Wool is just plain wonderful, but lots of other fibers hook up well, again, as long as they are not slippery. Figure that you will need around 4 oz of yarn per square foot of hooked area.

I make three different yarns that work well for rug hooking. Ewenique is a blend of fibers from our farm (65% Jacob wool, 35% adult mohair), Jacob’s Pride is a worsted-weight yarn that is 100% Jacob.

Handspinning yarn is a great way to design yarns with the exact features you want, such as thickness, texture, colors and fiber types. I do custom handspinning, but you can also check out spinning guilds in your area.

Handspun yarn is a great way to incorporate natural colors in your rugs. There is an amazing variety of breeds of sheep, fleece types and colors. This is a feature that is simply not available when hooking with fabric strips, and is something that I really enjoy in my rugs.

That being said, while I go through a ton of the above yarns, I also consume vast amounts of other brands. Halcyon Yarn (a mail order yarn company, also online) has three yarns that I love; Deco, Rug Wool and Botanica. Deco and Botanica are both worsted weight, Rug Wool is bulky.

Basically any yarn company will have a variety of weights, so look for their worsted/bulky offerings. Some of the brands I like are Patons Bulky, Reynold’s Lopi (lopi yarns are single ply yarns, lovely to work with, but not my first choice for floor rugs, not as durable as a plied yarn), Rowan Big Wool, Briggs & Little Super and Atlantic, Peace Fleece, Cascade Yarns,

Universal Deluxe Chunky, Araucania, Sensations Licorice, Lion’s Pride Organic Cotton, Blackberry Ridge, New Zealand Woolpack. I am always on the lookout for sales. (And by the way, Knitpicks.com is having a sale on wool yarns in worsted weight and bulky. I haven’t yet tried those brands but they look lovely!).

And one of the best sources of yarn is your very own stash! You have one, admit it. All those leftovers from knitting or crochet, or weaving, or macrame, whatever. All those gorgeous yarns you bought because you simply had to have them, regardless of what you might do with them. These are some of the most fun yarns to work with, because you can do such whimsical hit-or-miss designs.

Do yourself a favor, take out all those leftovers, all those yarn purchases and get them out where you can see them. Organize them by color, so color planning your project is a breeze. This will take up some space in your home studio, but it is so helpful. Every time I walk into my workroom, I feel inspired, like I get to ‘go shopping.’

The Featured Rug of the Month at http://www.littlehouserugs.com this month is a super easy hit or miss design, called Velkommen (Norwegian for ‘welcome’). Any and all of your leftover yarns will work great for this design, and it’s an easy way to get the hang of rug hooking.

Subscribers to this blog can get 30% off on Vilkommen kits and patterns at http://www.littlehouserugs.com/velkommenspecial.html.

Next topic: Which backing is best for rug hooking?

Non-Skid Rug Backing: 11 Easy Options for your Handmade Rug

Handmade rugs are beautiful and practical, but they have one potential flaw: slippage. It’s not only frustrating to slip and slide on a rug, it’s dangerous—one misstep and you can fall. Handmade rugs, whether they’re crocheted, knitted, or woven, need a non-skid rug backing.

Here are some easy ways to make your rug stick to the floor using products from hardware stores, your crafting stash, and your sewing basket. Not all of them are ideal for every situation. Some products are easier to apply but need periodic reapplication. Other options will show under lacy stitches or weave structures, so they’ll work better for “unholey” fabrics. Be sure to compare the options below to see what will work best for your project.

11 Non-Skid Rug Backing Options for Knit, Crocheted and Woven Rugs

Note: Follow the directions on the product for safety information and application instructions.

1. Nonslip Rug Pad and Double-Sided Tape

Cut a nonslip rug pad 1″ smaller than your rug on all sides. Adhere double-sided tape to the back of the rug, then press the rug onto the rug pad. This option allows you to position the rug somewhere else in your house. You can also remove the pad to wash the rug. (You can reuse the pad, though you’ll need to apply fresh tape.) The pad will be visible if used under a lacy rug.

2. Anti-Slip Spray

Simply spray the back of your rug with the product, which you can find in the spray paint section of hardware stores. This option is great for lacier fabrics. The spray may require multiple applications, as it can soak into the rug. It may also need reapplication after you wash your rug.

3. Shelf Liner and Adhesive-Backed Velcro

Cut a piece of non-adhesive shelf liner 1″ smaller than your rug on all sides. Cut the hook side of the Velcro into strips and stick them to the shelf liner. Lay your rug on top of the shelf liner—you won’t need the fuzzy Velcro side because the hooks will latch onto your yarn. Again, this option is not great for lacy rugs because the shelf liner will show through. Shelf liner can also discolor your floor (which might not be a problem if you are trying to cover up a nasty looking floor).

4. Rug Fasteners

These handy doodads are also called rug anchors or rug grippers. Depending on the brand you use, sometimes you stick the fasteners onto the rug and sometimes you stick them onto the floor. Then press the rug onto the floor, and it sticks like magic. Some brands can be removed for repositioning or laundering the rug. All of them come in small sizes, so you may be able to use them on lacy fabrics.

5. Puff Paint

Apply beads of puff paint to the back of your project, making sure the paint firmly grips the fabric. This option works well on lacy and solid rugs. You may have to reapply puff paint after laundering the rug.

6. Silicone Sealant

Apply long lines of silicone to the back of the rug, running the lines around the rug’s edges and all around the inside. For best results, flatten the lines so the silicone grips the fabric. Silicone is not water soluble, so can be a bit of a pain to clean off application tools, but it shouldn’t wash off the rug. You’ll find many sealant options in hardware stores.

7. Plastic Dip

Spray or brush this product on the back of your rug. You may only see it in black at your hardware or automotive supply store, but you can find it in clear or white on Amazon.

8. Fiber-Lok Non-Skid Backing

Paint this on the back of your rug. It is machine-washable and -dryable and cleans up with soap and water.

9. Acrylic Latex Caulk

Apply long lines of caulk to the back of the rug, running the lines around the rug’s edges and all around the inside. Then dab your finger in water and press caulk to rug so that it grips the fabric.

10. Carpet Tape

Adhere double-sided tape to your rug, then remove the coating on the second side and press to the floor. Don’t use it to tape rugs onto carpeting—it’s for hard surfaces only. Because it’s meant to be a permanent solution, it will leave a sticky residue on the floor if you remove the rug to reposition or launder it.

11. Rug Tape

Adhere tape to your rug and press to floor. Unlike carpet tape, rug tape sticks to the floor through a rubber backing rather than an adhesive, so it works great for almost any surface.

Non-Skid Rug Backing in Action

We tried a couple of these non-slip options on some recent crochet projects.

Geometric Throw Rug

This rectangular rug by Annie Modesitt was made with Willow Yarn Feather, a blend of linen and cotton. Annie used a brush to apply a thin coat of Fiber-Lok Non-Skid Backing. The coating was thin, which allows the rug to be rolled or folded without creating weird cracks or creases. The product does have a slight odor, so you may want to let your rug sit outside to air out.

Chunky Doily Rug

Pamela Wynne created a beautiful star-shaped rug for Crochet at Home. Susanna Tobias, our crochet project editor, made the project shown here. She modified the pattern into a half circle so she could place her rug at a door or at the kitchen sink. I decided to back the rug with acrylic latex caulking, which seemed like the most invisible option for the lacy motif.

Have you applied non-skid rug backings to your crocheted, knitted or woven rugs? I’d love to know what’s worked and what hasn’t. Leave me a comment.

—Dana

Crochet Home Decor to Inspire Your DIY Approach

DIY – How to Make Your Own Burlap Bedroom Rug from a Recycled Grain Sack

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Coffee bags and other burlap products have been recycled in just about anything. I’ve seen Victorian chairs and poofs upholstered with them. They’ve been made into anything from Easter bunnies to Christmas tree ornaments, and most of all, been transformed into other kinds of bags.

However, today’s burlap idea is way easier: transform your bag into a fun bedroom rug. Just like Irina Nunez from ‘Creative Babies’ did. And if you want to make it easiest, cut out the hunt for burlap bags, and purchase a stretch of inexpensive Burlap Fabric , which you can stencil later to your liking.

Howto Make Your Own Burlap Bedroom Rug

1. Wash your bag in cold water. Use fabric softener. Iron bag when nearly dry. Measure the circumference of your rug.

2. In contrast colored fabric, cut a 3” strip. Pin fabric onto bag and sew a 1.25 “ hem all around.

3. Iron edges for a flat finish.

Made by: Creative Babies

Click here for More Home Decoration & Creative Craft Ideas for Your Bedroom

tag: coffee bag

What kind of backing fabric is best for rug hooking?

As of January 2020, Hooking With Yarn has moved and has a new name, Rug Hooking Adventures. Same monthly posting, with tips & techniques, Featured Rug of the Month, web specials and more (just no more pesky ads!). Click here to sign up for the new blog. Thanks!

For rug hooking, we need an open-weave fabric, and the best ones are linen, burlap and monk’s cloth.

Linen is the most durable backing fabric you can use for rug hooking, and durability is a key component for making rugs that will last 100 years or more. Linen is made from the flax plant, and in order to be spun up, the plant must first be soaked in water to get rid of the outer plant material. What is left over, the part that has not rotted in the water, is what is spun into linen.

When we put rugs on the floor, we expect them to hold up to a good deal of wear and tear, and they will occasionally need to be washed. Linen is the best fiber because not only is it very strong, it is rot resistant, so it can get wet without degrading. If you want proof of linen’s extraordinary durability, you have only to look at the Bayeux Tapestry.

The Bayeux Tapestry (actually not a tapestry, it is an embroidery) is a very unique medieval textile made from wool yarn on linen fabric. It is amazing for many reasons. It is the only textile of its kind which tells, through embroidered cartoon, the story of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 (or at least one side of the story). It measures approximately 270 feet long and around 20 inches high.

It is also a marvel because it has lasted over 900 years, and for most of those centuries, was not kept under ideal conditions. It has survived being stored in damp, dingy cellars, two world wars and the French Revolution, and countless fires and natural disasters. Now it is displayed in a museum in the city of Bayeux, France, where ordinary humans like you and me can view it up close and personal. It is one of the coolest things I have ever seen, and inspired me to make a few rug hooking designs (more about them in a later post).

The only reason the Bayeux Tapestry exists today is because it was embroidered on linen. If any of my hooked rugs last for 900 years, that would make me very, very happy.

Burlap is a fabric that is very inexpensive and easy to find, so I use it in my beginner kits, as well as for small pillows, stuffed animals and other small ornaments that will not need to be washed. Burlap is made from the jute plant, which is wonderfully biodegradable. If you have ever purchased a shrub with the root ball wrapped in burlap, you don’t need to remove the burlap before planting it, because it will quickly deteriorate. So if I am making a project that is intended to go on the floor, I would use linen. If I am making a small wall hanging, I might use burlap, assuming that it will rarely, if ever need to be washed. However, if I am making a large wall hanging, I would still want linen because then I know the project will last.

There is a pretty big price difference between linen and burlap. Linen sells for $30-$35 per yard (or approximately $2 per square foot), whereas burlap sells for $4 per yard (around 44 cents per square foot). You can pay more for something called Scottish Burlap, but you are paying for a smoother fabric that is nicer to work with. Scottish Burlap is still made from jute, so it is prone to rot if it gets wet.

If you are anything like me, you would balk at spending $30 a yard for fabric, especially for fabric that won’t even be seen when the rug is finished! But linen is the only fabric that will ensure that my rug will be enjoyed for many generations to come. When you look at the cost per square foot for a hooked rug (mine start at $70 per square foot), and consider the cost of the yarn ($4-$20 per square foot of hooked area), the majority of the value of a hooked rug is by far the cost of my time and labor. I would spend exactly the same amount of time on a hooked rug that is made on burlap (saving myself $1.56 per square foot) but it would only last a fraction of the time, 20 years at best. So just trust me on this one, if you’re going to put the rug on the floor, it is penny wise but pound foolish to use burlap.

The third type of fabric that is commonly used in rug hooking is called Monk’s Cloth, which is made with cotton. Cotton is washable, so it is much better than burlap in that regard, but the fibers will become brittle with wear, so it’s not the most durable fabric you can use. And at around $15 per yard, it’s not that great of a bargain either. If you are bothered by working with burlap, and you are making something that won’t have to endure wear and tear, like a wall hanging, then Monk’s Cloth would work well for that.

I have been told that Monk’s Cloth is good for punch hooking. I can’t say with personal experience, since I don’t punch hook, but it may be preferred for punch hooking because it accommodates the punch tool better. In any event, I don’t use Monk’s Cloth because burlap and linen satisfy my needs.

Burlap and Monk’s Cloth can be purchased at your local fabric store, but linen is only sold by rug hooking companies (including Little House Rugs). As a special for my blog subscribers, you can order linen for 25% off for the month of March. Go to http://www.littlehouserugs.com/linen-blog-special.html to order.

Remember that for every $50.00 you spend at Little House Rugs between now and November 25, 2015, you will be entered to win this hand-hooked Santa (a $165.00 value).

Have fun and happy hooking!

Judy Taylor

http://www.littlehouserugs.com

Even before burlap bags were available in the market, burlap was the standard backing fabric used for rug hooking. Rug hooking is an art and craft practice where rugs are manufactured by stretching loops of fabric through a firm woven base such as burlap or linen. Some studies indicate that burlap backing was in practice since the colonial days!

Burlap backing benefits the customer in two ways, as it is both reliable and cheap. As burlap is a fabric, which has an ideal pore size, it is the most comfortable fabric to hook with. If you’re a beginner, you can start learning the basics of backing with burlap fabric, as it easy to work with. Burlap base is strong enough to hold all kinds of wool and threads and is also known to restrict curl formation, provided you place your hooks well. Once the rug is completed, the burlap fabric allows you to make finishing touches or size related alterations to the rug, a sheer indication of its firm nature. Burlap fabrics add elegance to an event, with their attractive texture and solid colors. Burlap backing for rug hooking involves a homemade rug, which is revamped by giving it a classic, rugged, feel while not compromising its authenticity.

We, at Hometex, offer a wide range of burlap roll lengths to comply with your specific needs.

Rug Hooking 101: A How to Guide for Beginner Rug Hookers

How to Hook Rugs from Start to Finish

A Free Beginner How to Course in Hooking Rugs

compliments of Deanne Fitzpatrick Rug Hooking Studio

Hooking rugs is easy. You can even teach yourself. You pull strips of wool cloth, usually recycled clothing, washed , dried , and torn apart through a burlap or linen backing loop by loop. There are no hard and fast rules. The simplest way to learn is to pick out a kit at our online shop or you can start from scratch. We have a free instructional video to teach you how to hook. Either way these are the basic steps you will need to know:

Getting Started

The rug above is my very first project. I went off to a meeting of the Nova Scotia Rug Hooking Guild at the Tatamagouche Centre and Marion Kennedy sold me a kit and and taught me how to hook rugs. As I was hooking, she pointed out some mistakes I was making and I asked her, “Should I pull it out and start again?” She said, “Don’t do that you will learn as you go along. Finish it, that’s your job, finish it.” With less than three square inches of the rug hooked this seemed like a dauntingly job but it wasn’t. It turned out that as I kept at it , I learned as I went along. I kept her voice in my head, “finish the mat” and I finished this first project with in a week, and quickly moved on to design my next rug.

Rug Hooking is a simple craft that you can easily teach yourself. I recommend a kit for beginners because you have everything you need to get started.Here are some basic instructions for rug hooking. You can also learn lots more through our online courses or studio workshops.

1. You first fasten your pattern, which is a piece of burlap with a picture drawn upon onto a frame such as a heavy duty quilting hoop, or a stretcher bar.

2. Cut a strip of wool cloth about one quarter an inch wide, and about eight to twelve inches long.

3. Hold your hook in the hand you use to hold your pencil, and the strip of wool in the other hand. Put your hook down through a hole in the burlap backing, and catch the piece of wool, pulling it up thru the burlap. Bring the first end right up through, then continue the hooking pulling it up loop by loop.

4. In primitive hooking , you generally start by outlining an area and then filling it in.

5.Continue hooking until the whole mat is done. Bring all your ends of wool to the surface and clip them evenly with your loops.

6.When you finish your project, cut the excess burlap away from the edge, leaving no more than two inches all around. Use this to bind the rug by folding it and sewing it along the backside of the rug. You can also use cotton twill tape to bind it along the edge.

7.The final stage is to press you rugs with a wet cloth and hot iron on both sides to even out the loops and give your rug a finished look

Videos and How To That Tell You the Basics of Hooking Rugs:

Some of the kits from our online shop:

Pitched Roof Starter Pack

Grey Barn in the Field

Coastal Girls

You can also learn on our online courses or studio workshops.

7 Burlap rug hooking ideas

I’m so excited by this one…this was in the latest Purple Kitty Yarns newsletter that I get, and I have been looking for it for years. Why? Because a friend of my mother’s commissi…

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