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Can You Use A Planer Without A Jointer | Milling Rough Lumber Without A Jointer Using A Few Simple Jigs The 128 New Answer

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Board going through jointer. Traditionally, a jointer flattens boards and a planer brings them to thickness (see Parallel universe, below). But if you don’t own a jointer, or you need to flatten a board wider than your jointer beds, your planer or router can do the flattening when you follow these steps.Most woodworkers know that you need both a planer and a jointer to get the most out of rough lumber (at least for power tool users). The jointer is used to flatten one face and square up one edge and the planer is then used to make the second face flat and parallel to the first.Perhaps the best substitute for edge jointing is a router table with a fence that can be shimmed.

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I get asked a lot about which tool to purchase first, a Planer or a Jointer? I always say PLANER because you can get around not having a Jointer with a few simple jigs!
For more details, check out my website – https://www.3x3custom.com/tutorials/
Planer Sled Video from Wood Work Web – https://youtu.be/OK5CxqYmUSo
Using a Router Table as a Jointer Video – https://youtu.be/ozsFaOnaL84
Tapering Jig Video – https://youtu.be/qwp0a-_YxSo
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0:00 Intro
0:27 STEP ONE: Flatten One Face
6:24 STEP TWO: Make The Opposite Face Parallel
7:33 Policygenius Sponsorship
9:13 STEP THREE: Square Up One Edge
15:35 STEP FOUR: Square Up the Opposite Edge
17:18 Some Things to Note…
Links above are affiliate links, I make a small commission if you click on them at no extra cost to you. clicking on them really helps me continue to make more projects 🙂

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How to flatten boards without a jointer – FineWoodworking

If you lack a we jointer, you’re going to need your planer sled pretty often, so it’s nice to have one that is quick to set up and always …

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Planer without jointer or vice versa? : r/BeginnerWoodWorking

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Can I get away with no jointer and just a planer?

So, YES you can get away without having a jointer. Straight edges can be done with a circular saw and a straight edge gue OR a straight line …

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Which Comes First: Planer or Jointer? – The Wood Whisperer

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Woodworking Without a Jointer or a Planer (Easy Tips And …

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Q&A: Planing Without Jointing – Popular Woodworking

A: As the saying goes: “Garbage in, garbage out.” Normally, a planer can’t take the twist out of a board; it merely makes the top se parallel …

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How to Use Your Planer as Jointer for Milling Large Pieces of …

A planer can be used as a jointer by following a few woodworking tricks.

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Milling Rough Lumber Without a Jointer Using a Few Simple Jigs

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  • Author: 3x3Custom – Tamar
  • Views: 997,238 views
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  • Date Published: Jan 24, 2021
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWOB-WIDkOs

Do I need a jointer if I have a planer?

Most woodworkers know that you need both a planer and a jointer to get the most out of rough lumber (at least for power tool users). The jointer is used to flatten one face and square up one edge and the planer is then used to make the second face flat and parallel to the first.

What can I use if I don’t have a jointer?

Perhaps the best substitute for edge jointing is a router table with a fence that can be shimmed.

Can a planer replace a jointer?

A planer can be used as a jointer by following a few woodworking tricks. Woodworking jointers and planers are used to mill wood so they can be used to build furniture and other projects to correct dimensions.

Do I need a jointer if I have a table saw?

Jointing with Table Saw to Square Both Sides of a Wood Piece (without jointer) Although the table saw can be used as a jointer to make the faces of a wood piece flat, it can also be used to square an edge to have perfectly perpendicular faces.

Can a planer flatten a cupped board?

It is difficult to flatten a cupped board with a thickness planer because the downward pressure of the feed rolls will press out much of the cup, thereby not allowing the planer knives to flatten the board. As it emerges from the planer, it simply springs back to its original cup.

Should I plane or jointer first?

That is why you should go for the planer first. Then later, you can get a jointer. Also, even if you have flat faces of wood but the edges of the board are not flat or square, you can always use a circular saw with a guide, a table saw or a hand planer to get the edges square.

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Are planers worth it?

If you really want to get into woodworking, a thickness planer is worth the cost. Once you have it, you’ll never regret the expenditure, because you’ll be in control of your stock thickness like never before.

Are handheld planers any good?

A: Electric hand planers can make your life much easier especially if you have a lot of project planing doors. This tool makes smoothing out wood an easy job and there are plenty of budget option to consider if you want to make this aspect of woodworking easier without splurging.

Face-jointing Without a Jointer

Tditionally, a jointer flattens boards and a planer brings them to thickness. But if you don’t own a jointer, your planer or router can do the flattening when you follow these steps.

Traditionally, a jointer flattens boards and a planer brings them to thickness (see Parallel universe, below). But if you don’t own a jointer, or you need to flatten a board wider than your jointer beds, your planer or router can do the flattening when you follow these steps.

Parallel universe The standard procedure for milling lumber starts with flattening one face of a board on the jointer, then surfacing the opposite face flat and parallel to the first at the planer. You may be tempted to skip the first step and head straight to the planer. But this approach usually yields less than satisfactory results.

With both a planer and jointer, the board travels over a bed while a spinning cutterhead shaves off material. On a jointer, you guide the workpiece by hand over the cutterhead, removing material from the bottom face. A planer’s cutterhead removes material from the top face driven by pressure rollers that press the board flat to the bed. If the bottom face isn’t flat, the board simply springs back to its distorted shape after clearing the rollers. So instead of a flat face, you end up with a board that is just as twisted as when you started (only thinner).

Run along the sidelines

For a slightly cupped workpiece, attach a pair of runners to the edges of the board to support the workpiece during planing. Start by cutting a pair of runners 2″ longer and thick enough so they stand 1⁄ 8 ” proud of the cupped board you’re flattening. Place the board on your workbench or a flat surface, then attach the runners to the edges of the board with glue or double-faced tape [Photo A]. Make sure both runners rest flat on the worksurface.

Sides being clamped to board. With the cupped surface facing down, glue and clamp runners to the edges of the workpiece.

With the board fully supported by the runners, feed it through the planer, taking light passes. The runners take the brunt of the force from the planer feed rollers, preventing them from distorting the workpiece during planing. With one face flat, remove the runners and flip the workpiece over to plane the opposite face.

Tip!

Scribble lines across the face of the board to help monitor the planing progress.

For extra-wide or severely cupped boards, rip the board into two equal-width pieces (cupped side facing up so the board doesn’t bind the blade). Plane the pieces individually using runners. Then re-rip the edges at the tablesaw or joint them at the router table to ensure they’re square to the now-flat faces before gluing them back together. (Mark the ends of the boards before planing so you can glue them back together in the same orientation.) This divide-and-conquer approach minimizes the amount of wood removed, yielding a thicker finished board.

Resist the twist

Tip!

For a severely twisted board, knock down the high spots on the bottom face with a hand plane first to reduce the amount of shimming needed.

A planer can also flatten one face of a twisted or warped workpiece, so long as you “fix” the workpiece in a stable position. To do this, make a sled from MDF or plywood a couple of inches longer and wider than your workpiece (but not wider than your planer’s capacity). Glue to the top of the sled at the trailing end a cleat thinner than the stock you’re flattening.

Butt one end of the workpiece against the cleat and press down on the board at opposite corners to locate gaps where it doesn’t contact the sled. Insert wedges or shims under these trouble spots to remove the wobble [Photo B].

Shims under a board. After shimming the board so it rests solidly on the sled, remove the shims one at a time and secure them with double-faced tape.

With the shims installed, feed the sled and workpiece through the planer, taking light passes until the face is flat [Photo C]. Remove the workpiece from the sled and flip it over to plane the opposite face flat.

Two boards going through jointer. Support the sled as it exits the planer to avoid snipe on the end of the workpiece.

Going wide

Flattening slabs or boards wider than the width of your planer presents some additional challenges. If ripping the boards to fit through your planer isn’t an option, consider skipping the planer altogether and using a router flattening jig. Start by cutting a plywood base large enough to accommodate the piece you wish to flatten [Drawing 1]. Add a pair of rails along the edges. Make a carriage to straddle the base and cut a piece of acrylic to fit inside the carriage. Remove the subbase from your router and mount the router to the acrylic plate [Drawing 2]. Attach a fitting for your shop vacuum hose [Sources] to the plate.

Base for router carriage.

Illustration showing router plate.

To use the jig, place the workpiece on the base and shim underneath to prevent rocking. Screw hardwood cleats to the base to trap the workpiece. With a shop vacuum attached, rout back and forth across the workpiece, taking no more than a 1⁄ 8 “-deep cut [Photo D]. Slide the carriage along the base until you’ve worked the entire length of the board. If necessary, plunge the bit a little deeper and take another series of cuts, until you flatten the entire face. Then flip the board over, remove any shims, and repeat the process to flatten the second face. Sand both sides to remove the router marks.

Using a flat-bottom planer.Using a flat-bottom planer or dado bit [Sources], work your way back and forth along the length of th Using a flat-bottom planer or dado bit [Sources], work your way back and forth along the length of the board to flatten the entire surface.

Sources:

Conveyor brush: 2″×6′ conveyor strip brush, no. 7372T11, $75.51; 27⁄ 16 “×3′ (right-angle) conveyor strip brush, no. 7372T15, McMaster-Carr, 630-833-0300,

mcmaster.com.

Dust port: 21⁄ 2 ” dust port,

no. 42137, Rockler,

800-279-4441, rockler.com.

Which Comes First: Planer or Jointer?

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Machine Substitutions: Woodworking Without a Jointer

About: Maker on YouTube. Helping others break barriers to making by inspiring and informing.

No jointer, no problem! This Instructable is all about how to do everything a jointer does, without a jointer.

This is intended to be a reference. If you have some experience, my brief explanation will be enough to send you on your way! But if you’re newer to this hobby, I’ve also included links along the way to other videos me and some of my friends have done that provide full explanations of the substitute techniques.

This Instructable is organized under each task you can perform on a jointer and then providing substitute techniques.

You can find my full article on my website at: https://www.ycmt2.com/jointer_substitutions

How to Use Your Planer as Jointer for Milling Large Pieces of Wood

Woodworking jointers and planers are used to mill wood so they can be used to build furniture and other projects to correct dimensions. If your workshop doesn’t have a jointer to square up an edge or your wood piece is too large to fit through, you can use your planer to flatten both pieces of wood.

Colin from the YouTube channel WoodWorkWeb, takes us through the exact scenario of trying to joint a twisted piece of wood that is too large to fit through his jointer.

This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

By setting up your stock on a flat table that can slide through the planer, and using a sticky mat and shims to level the wood out, you can get the first side of the wood flat, the biggest obstacle in milling wood. Once one side is flat you can plane the other side which will make it parallel to the first and you’ve got yourself a milled piece of wood using only a planer.

Timothy Dahl DIY Editor Timothy is a lifelong DIY enthusiast who is fixated on smart home tech, beautiful tools, and wrenching on his FJ62 Land Cruiser.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

How to flatten boards without a jointer

One of the first milling tools most people buy is a thickness planer. That’s because a 12- or 13-in.-wide lunchbox-style planer is relatively affordable. Soon afterward, you discover your beautiful planer’s Achilles heel: Send in a curved board, and it emerges just as curved—smooth, yes, with uniform thickness, but what good is that if the board is still warped?

You’ve encountered one of woodworking’s inconvenient truths: You need a way to flatten one side of a board before sending it through the planer. The best solution is a jointer: Joint one surface of any board flat and straight, send that board through the planer—flat face down on the bed—and a beautiful workpiece rolls out the other side, with two, flat, straight, smooth, parallel faces.

Here’s the rub: The jointer is a heavier, pricier tool than a basic planer, and any model wider than 6 in. starts getting pretty expensive, even if you buy it used (not a bad idea). That means you don’t just need a jointer; you need one as wide as the boards you’ll commonly use.

Don’t panic just yet. While you are waiting to buy an 8- or 12-in.-wide jointer that can keep up with your planer, or maybe even a 12-in. jointer/planer combo machine with a segmented carbide head (insert angelic chorus), here are a few great ways to get flat, straight boards without owning a wide jointer. I’ll start with the simplest option, showing you just how easy it is to get out of jointer jeopardy.

Buy straight boards to begin with

The simplest method is to be choosy at the lumberyard. If you can sort through the stacks, you’ll likely find nice-looking boards that are almost perfectly straight to start with.

A few words of warning. This works best if the lumber was stored indoors, closer to the conditions of your shop. That’s because wood moves and warps when the relative humidity changes. So this is a good method for finding straight boards to put through your planer, but not the best.

All three of the following methods let you take full control of your lumber and flatten any board. All involve some kind of sled, which provides a flat reference surface for the planer, with the wonky board held on top and wedged so it doesn’t rock as the planer rolls. Better yet, these videos and articles are all free on FineWoodworking.com. The only difference between the sleds is how long it takes to make each one vs. how long it takes to set it up.

Simple sled is quick to build

In this quick video, Dillon Ryan demonstrates the simplest path to flattening wide boards in your planer, using the most basic of sleds. This one is nothing more than a piece of plywood with a stop on one end, to keep the board from sliding off the sled, plus small edges hot-glued under the stock on the top side. You can make it from scrap in about 10 minutes, and if you make it long enough, it will work on all sorts of boards.

A few construction notes. If you do make the sled longer, I would be sure to make it from 3/4-in. plywood for rigidity. And be sure to wax the bottom for easy sliding, as noted in the video. You might also make it from melamine particleboard so it will slide easily and any stray hot glue will be easier to peel off.

Use a straightedge clamp for a sled that sets up fast

If you lack a wide jointer, you’re going to need your planer sled pretty often, so it’s nice to have one that is quick to set up and always ready to go. That’s why this jointing sled is my personal favorite. It offers an excellent balance of short construction time and fast setup.

This sled is drawn from the Workshop Tips department of FWW, and is built around one of those long clamp-on straightedges you can use to guide a circular saw or router. In this case, it’s inset into the sled, so it can grab the front and back edge of any board. After that, you just stick a few wedges under the board to level and stabilize it, and into the planer it goes. Like the next sled below, you could just build this one and use it indefinitely, never needing a jointer at all.

That said, you’ll still want a wide jointer someday, if you have the space and cash. It’s lovely to have that amazing machine always at the ready.

Like building cool jigs? This planer sled is the king

With built-in leveling bars that will stabilize any board, this amazing jig sets up the fastest. It takes more time to build than the previous two, but it’s darn impressive. It’s also heavier than the other sleds, so I would add a support stand at the back end of the planer to help me handle it.

You can get the full article just by entering your email address, and/or watch the free video that goes with it. It’s pretty cool!

Bonus tip: Flatten boards just a little wider than your jointer

This tip is an exception to the others, but it’s the easiest approach of all if you have a jointer but it’s just an inch or two narrower than your boards. It’s actually a combination of a special jointer technique and the simplest of planer sleds: a plain piece of plywood.

While the inestimable Mike Pekovich didn’t invent this technique, he demonstrates it beautifully in his video series on making a hayrake-style dining table. You’ll need a membership to watch this one, but a FWW.com membership is the best tool you can buy!

Sign up for eletters today and get the latest techniques and how-to from Fine Woodworking, plus special offers. Sign Up

Which Comes First: Planer or Jointer?

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Woodworking Without a Jointer or a Planer (Easy Tips And Tricks)

If you’ve ever worked on rough lumber, then you probably already know a little bit about a planers and jointers.

Whether you are building large furniture pieces, or making small gifts, jointers and planers can help you make quick work of straightening and smoothing down timber.

But lets say that for one reason or another, you can’t access a jointer or a planer right now. Does that mean you can still make a success out of your next woodwork project?

Short answer? Yes, you can – but you may need to stretch your budget a little bit next time you pop round to the lumber yard.

If you purchase S4S (surface four sides) hardwood boards, you can get rough lumber that has already been prepared, planed and straightened for you. However, S4S wood is often pricier than rough discount lumber.

Still, more often than not, even S4S hardwood will need at least a little extra work to fine-tune it for your projects exact specifications.

And if you simply don’t have the budget right now for S4S boards, then what other options are there?

Keep reading to find out…

This post may contain affiliate links to products that we receive a commission for (at no additional cost to you). Learn more here.

The answer to whether you need a jointer and a planer seems simple enough… in an ideal world you would have both in your toolkit.

But, deciding whether you need a jointer and/or a planer actually depends on what kind of woodwork project you’re working on.

That is because jointers and planers are used to accomplish two related, yet very different, tasks.

What is a jointer used for?

When you buy boards from your local hardware store, you will notice that the wood tends to be all twisted up – a far cry from the smooth level planed wood you ideally want to work on.

The reason for this is simple; Moisture.

Trees have a lot of water in them. And when they’re logged and cut down into small sized boards, these moisture filled boards need to be air-dried completely before they can be used.

Now, wood is quite malleable when it comes to moisture. Wood will expand as it takes in moisture, and then shrink as it dries and hardens.

That expansion and shrinking process is what causes wood to twist and warp.

If wood is thoroughly dried – and then stored away from high humidity environments – then you can greatly minimize that warping effect.

However, there will always be some measure of distortion in hardwood boards.

So then, coming back to the original question, the job of a jointer tool is to flatten out all of those warps and twists in the wood.

In other words, you need to straighten out rough lumber with a jointer prior to using a planer.

3 Reasons Why Woodworking Is So Goo… To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video 3 Reasons Why Woodworking Is So Good For You Do you really need a jointer?

In my opinion, if you want to save yourself a lot of frustration and time, then you should try to get your hands on a decent jointer.

If money issues are holding you back from getting a jointer tool, then you could consider purchasing a second hand jointer.

Online classified websites such as Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist are a great way to find used workshop tools locally.

On the other hand, if you have a set of hand planes in your toolbox – coupled with a decent table saw – then you don’t need to bother with a jointer. You can get rough lumber flat enough for use with a combination of just the planes and the table saw.

Can you plane wood without a planer?

Yes, but it will take a little bit of elbow grease (and a good dose of ingenuity).

If you don’t have a planer, then here are a couple of alternatives you can try;

Sandpaper

This will be a very time intensive way to plane out the surface of the wood grain.

However, if you are working on a compact craft such as a small gift box, then using coarse sandpaper, (and applying some pressure as you sand), can be a viable alternative to a planer.

Routers

You can opt to use a router as a planer. You would need to construct a router sled like the one in the video below first. But once you set it up, it will get the job done!

Final Thoughts

So do you really need a jointer and planer? No you don’t.

But only if you are willing to substitute in some alternative woodwork tools, opt for S4S hardwood, and you are ready to put in a little bit of extra effort.

Q&A: Planing Without Jointing

Q: Help! For the life of me, I can’t get the twist out of rough lumber when I run it through my planer. I don’t own a jointer yet, but isn’t there some way to make flat boards with a planer?

A: As the saying goes: “Garbage in, garbage out.” Normally, a planer can’t take the twist out of a board; it merely makes the top side parallel to the bottom. To get a board flat without a jointer, fool the planer into thinking the bottom of your board is already flat.

Build a sled from two 3/4-in. medium density fiberboard (MDF) shelves. These shelves are cheap and widely available. Two of them make a really stiff sled. Shim the high spots with playing cards taped to the sled. Using shallow cuts, run the board through the planer until you’ve cleaned up the top side. Then flip the board over and plane to thickness.

How to Use Your Planer as Jointer for Milling Large Pieces of Wood

Woodworking jointers and planers are used to mill wood so they can be used to build furniture and other projects to correct dimensions. If your workshop doesn’t have a jointer to square up an edge or your wood piece is too large to fit through, you can use your planer to flatten both pieces of wood.

Colin from the YouTube channel WoodWorkWeb, takes us through the exact scenario of trying to joint a twisted piece of wood that is too large to fit through his jointer.

This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

By setting up your stock on a flat table that can slide through the planer, and using a sticky mat and shims to level the wood out, you can get the first side of the wood flat, the biggest obstacle in milling wood. Once one side is flat you can plane the other side which will make it parallel to the first and you’ve got yourself a milled piece of wood using only a planer.

Timothy Dahl DIY Editor Timothy is a lifelong DIY enthusiast who is fixated on smart home tech, beautiful tools, and wrenching on his FJ62 Land Cruiser.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Machine Substitutions: Woodworking Without a Jointer

About: Maker on YouTube. Helping others break barriers to making by inspiring and informing.

No jointer, no problem! This Instructable is all about how to do everything a jointer does, without a jointer.

This is intended to be a reference. If you have some experience, my brief explanation will be enough to send you on your way! But if you’re newer to this hobby, I’ve also included links along the way to other videos me and some of my friends have done that provide full explanations of the substitute techniques.

This Instructable is organized under each task you can perform on a jointer and then providing substitute techniques.

You can find my full article on my website at: https://www.ycmt2.com/jointer_substitutions

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