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Can You Travel The Chisholm Trail | Travel The Chisholm Trail! The 76 Correct Answer

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The Chisholm Trail has left a permanent hoof print on the culture and heritage of western Oklahoma. Travel along this famed trail to experience the stories of pioneering cattle drives on a legendary piece of the Old West.Chisholm Trail, 19th-century cattle drovers’ trail in the western United States. Although its exact route is uncertain, it originated south of San Antonio, Texas, ran north across Oklahoma, and ended at Abilene, Kansas. Little is known of its early history.PROJECT UPDATE WINTER 2022

Work has continued to progress along phase 1 of the Chisholm Trail, and we are now pleased to announce that the Trail is now open for public use. Access to the Trail is available, connecting Cambridge North to Coldham’s Lane via the Abbey-Chesterton bridge.

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Chisholm Trail | Texas Time Travel

Mobile Tour – Go mobile with the Chisholm Trail mobile tour, … All veos in the series are linked below, and you can watch the first one in the series …

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Source: texastimetravel.com

Date Published: 10/16/2021

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Texas Road Trip: The 8 Best Stops Along the Chisholm Trail

From Kingsville to Fort Worth, this Chisholm Trail-inspired road trip will introduce you to Texas history, fantastic attractions, …

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Source: www.travelawaits.com

Date Published: 6/1/2022

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Chisholm Trail – Wikipedia

The Chisholm Trail was a trail used in the post-Civil War era to drive cattle overland from ranches in Texas to Kansas railheads. The trail was established …

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Source: en.wikipedia.org

Date Published: 10/1/2022

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Chisholm Trail – Greater Cambridge Partnership

The Chisholm Trail is an exciting new walking and cycling route, creating a mostly … The first two sections of the Trail we are looking to deliver are: -.

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Source: www.greatercambridge.org.uk

Date Published: 6/8/2021

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Enid and the Chisholm Trail

You can now drive the Chisholm Trail through En thanks to the City of … DVD and audio travel gue CD featuring Bob Klemme and the Chisholm Trail as it …

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Source: www.visitenid.org

Date Published: 1/1/2021

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The Chisholm Trail: Exploring the Folklore and Legacy

This mobile tour will gue you along one of the most famous cattle trails in history: the Chisholm Trail. We’ll travel back in time, and soak up dozens of …

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Source: texastimetravel.oncell.com

Date Published: 7/23/2022

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Travel the Chisholm Trail! – Bell County Museum

Packets of materials can be picked up at the museum starting on. September 5. You will need the following additional supplies for the activity:

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Source: www.bellcountymuseum.org

Date Published: 9/21/2022

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How many states does the Chisholm Trail go through?

Chisholm Trail, 19th-century cattle drovers’ trail in the western United States. Although its exact route is uncertain, it originated south of San Antonio, Texas, ran north across Oklahoma, and ended at Abilene, Kansas. Little is known of its early history.

Is the Chisholm Trail Cambridge Open?

PROJECT UPDATE WINTER 2022

Work has continued to progress along phase 1 of the Chisholm Trail, and we are now pleased to announce that the Trail is now open for public use. Access to the Trail is available, connecting Cambridge North to Coldham’s Lane via the Abbey-Chesterton bridge.

What is the length of the Chisholm Trail?

Eventually the Chisholm Trail would stretch eight hundred miles from South Texas to Fort Worth and on through Oklahoma to Kansas.

Did the Chisholm Trail go through Texas?

The Chisholm Trail was the major route out of Texas for livestock. Although it was used only from 1867 to 1884, the longhorn cattle driven north along it provided a steady source of income that helped the impoverished state recover from the Civil War.

Why did people stop using the Chisholm Trail?

Violence, vigilante groups, and cattle rustling caused further problems for the drovers. By 1859, the driving of cattle was outlawed in many Missouri jurisdictions. By the end of the Civil War, most cattle were being moved up the western branch of trail, being gathered at Red River Station in Montague County, Texas.

How much is the Chisholm Trail Tollway?

Tolls. As of August 2020, it costs a two-axle passenger vehicle $8.70 in cash to drive the entire length of the toll road in either direction. Two-axle vehicles paying with TollTag are only charged $5.79 for the same trip.

Which towns were along the Chisholm Trail?

The Chisholm Trail in Kansas generally follows a true north route through or near the following communities in Central Kansas: Caldwell, Clearwater, Wichita, Newton, Goessel, Lehigh and Abilene.

What state is the Chisholm Trail in?

What is the Chisholm Trail in Oklahoma?

The Chisholm Trail was a series of trails that led from ranches around San Antonio, Texas, crossing the Red River though current-day Oklahoma to the expanding Kansas railheads of Abilene, Ellsworth, and Dodge City.

How fast did a cattle drive move?

Movement of cattle

On average, a herd could maintain a healthy weight moving about 15 miles (24 km) per day. Such a pace meant that it would take as long as two months to travel from a home ranch to a railhead. The Chisholm Trail, for example, was 1,000 miles (1,600 km) long.

Which cattle trail was the longest?

The Great Western Trail, the last and longest of the major routes for driving Texas cattle to northern markets, has existed in the shadow of the famous Chisholm Trail, which ran approximately 100 miles farther east. The trail had many names as it moved north 2,000 miles.

How long did it typically take to traverse the Chisholm Trail?

Joseph, Mo. Texas cowboys had driven cattle to Missouri along the well-established route for at least 20 years, and the drive should have taken about two months.

What was the largest cattle drive?

But there’s a group of stubborn men and women in Wyoming who every spring push thousands of cows along the same 70-mile route their ancestors pioneered 125 years ago. This throwback to the Old West is called the Green River Drift, and it’s the longest-running cattle drive left in America.

How many men served on a cattle drive?

There were nine or 10 wranglers and drovers – sometimes called “thirty-dollar men” – per crew. The wrangler managed the herd of spare horses, known as the remuda, made up of eight or 10 horses for each man. The remaining drovers were appointed to their posts along the line of cattle in the drive.

Why did the great Texas cattle drives end?

In the 1890s, herds were still driven from the Panhandle of Texas to Montana, but by 1895 trail driving had virtually ended because of barbed wire, railroads, and settlement.

Road Trip: The Chisholm Trail

Located along what is now U.S. 81, the Chisholm Trail is packed with beautiful landscapes and a wildly exciting history.

Located along what is now U.S. 81, the Chisholm Trail is packed with beautiful landscapes and a wildly exciting history. This iconic cattle trail, carved into the red Oklahoma dirt, once provided a pass for south Texas ranchers to distribute beef to northern states. Today, the route winds through charming small towns boasting big landmarks and historical centers. 2017 marks the 150th anniversary of the famed route, and Oklahoma has tons of special events in store. Read on for must-see events and attractions along the way.

Duncan

Between 1867 and 1877, more than three million head of cattle passed along the Chisholm Trail in Oklahoma. One of the most famed strips of land in the American West was created by trader Jesse Chisholm, a character you’ll meet at the Chisholm Trail Heritage Center in Duncan. Here, you’ll be introduced to an assortment of historical figures who helped carve out this famous route. Visitors to the center are greeted by life-size sculptures of cowboys driving longhorns along the trail. Step inside to find the trail drawn out on a path to give visitors a sense of the trail’s geography and the cultural impact it had on the region.

Interactive exhibits let little cowpokes try their hand at tossing a lasso on a steer or riding a bucking bronco. Step into the multi-sensory theater to feel the splash of the herd through a creek and smell the coffee cooking over an open flame. Then, gather around the museum’s campfire to hear Jesse Chisholm himself impart the history of the trail.

While in Duncan, one must-see stop includes the Trail Ruts at Monument Hill where you can spot visible remains of the famed Chisholm Trail etched by the hooves of cattle. Opt to explore the area on your own or sign up for a guided Chisholm Trail Tour to get the inside scoop on Duncan’s historic markers.

Marlow

Continue on the trail to Marlow to find a piece of the route packed with outlaw legends. Imaginations run wild in this town, which was named for the Marlow brothers, a group falsely accused of rustling cattle on the Chisholm Trail. Their story was most famously portrayed in the film, “The Sons of Katie Elder,” starring John Wayne. Head to the Marlow Area Museum to see artifacts from the Marlow family including the contract signed by the members of the family handing over the rights for the film. The museum also houses the original tombstones of Marlow brothers Alfred, Boone and Lewellyn.

At Marlow’s Redbud Park, a Western-themed playground called “The Hideout” adds to the outlaw experience. The playground gives young travelers the opportunity to play outlaw, while setting out on the half-mile walking trail gives visitors the chance to glimpse the rugged cattle route. Redbud Park encompasses 10 city blocks and is also home to Redbud Chapel, one of the first churches built in the area.

Yukon

Make a stop in Yukon to follow in the footsteps of cattle drivers who saw this pleasant piece of Oklahoma land as a great place to rest. Their stopping point is memorialized at the Chisholm Trail Watering Hole & Historic Marker. Located near the Freedom Trail Playground, it’s the ideal stop for young history buffs to enjoy a dinosaur dig in addition to on-site playground.

Step into the multi-sensory theater to feel the splash of the herd through a creek and smell the coffee cooking over an open flame.

Another Yukon stop that beckons travelers is the Express Clydesdales Ranch. Step into a beautiful Amish-built barn that’s been standing strong along the Chisholm Trail since 1936 and you’ll be greeted by impressive horses weighing almost a ton each and standing about six feet tall at the shoulder. The Yukon Historical Society has paired with the ranch to present the history of the Old West cattle drives through exhibits in the barn’s loft area and throughout the property. From the loft, gaze out over miles and miles of rolling Oklahoma farm land.

Pay tribute at trailblazer Jesse Chisholm’s Grave Site located outside of Geary. For the last 40 years of his life, the Cherokee trader, guide and peacemaker lived his life in Indian Territory and passed away near a well-known watering stop along old Chishom Trail called Left Hand Spring. Today, his grave is marked with a granite monument denoting his importance to the area.

Kingfisher

A visit to Kingfisher solidifies the impact the Chisholm Trail had on the community with a life-size statue of Jesse Chisholm standing right in the center of downtown. The iconic trailblazer is depicted on top of a horse, extending a peace pipe just as he might have done while traveling through Indian Territory to trade buffalo hides in Kansas.

The Chisholm Trail Museum & Governor Seay Mansion in Kingfisher is packed with impressive exhibits that reveal the timeline of the trail beginning with Jesse Chisholm and ending with the land runs at the end of the century. Some of the museum displays feature a frontier village with a church, bank and log cabin that was once home to the mother of the Dalton Gang, one of the region’s most famous outlaw outfits.

Fun photo op: Located 20 minutes north of Kingfisher, you’ll find Bull Foot Park in Hennessey, which was once a re-supply stop on the Chisholm Trail and is now a park with a cattle drive sculpture garden.

Enid

Wrap up your road trip in Enid to see how this famous route through Oklahoma forever changed the state and its settlers. Head to the Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center to see how the trail blazed by cattlemen later welcomed a boom with the Land Run of 1893 that settled Enid. The movement of cattle through the area laid the foundation for the farming and cattle industries that continue today.

In addition to a one-of-a-kind museum packed with educational exhibits, the center is home to the Humphrey Heritage Village, a living history village that reveals every aspect of pioneer life. Go back in time as you stroll through a one-room schoolhouse, Enid’s first Episcopal church, a family home built in 1905 and the only remaining land office from the 1893 Land Run.

While in Enid, take a jaunt over to Simpson’s Old Time Museum & Movie Studio for a fun and fascinating glimpse of Wild West history. An authentic trail scene complete with a campfire, chuck wagon cook and life-size bison will take you right back to the dusty trail days.

Chisholm Trail | Definition, History, & Facts

Chisholm Trail, 19th-century cattle drovers’ trail in the western United States. Although its exact route is uncertain, it originated south of San Antonio, Texas, ran north across Oklahoma, and ended at Abilene, Kansas. Little is known of its early history. It was probably named for Jesse Chisholm, a 19th-century trader. In 1867 a cattle-shipping depot on the Kansas Pacific Railroad was established in Abilene by Joseph G. McCoy. Between 1867 and 1871 about 1,500,000 head of cattle were driven north along the trail to Abilene, which was the departure point for shipment of the cattle to eastern markets. The trail’s importance declined after 1871, as other railheads were established, but increased again in the 1880s when the Santa Fe Railroad reached Caldwell, Kansas. The long cattle drives gradually declined as the railroads built branch lines in the late 19th century.

Chisholm Trail Chisholm Trial, mural in Fort Worth, Texas. John Margolies Roadside America photograph archive/Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. (mrg 04847)

Chisholm Trail

PROJECT UPDATE PHASE 2

SUMMER 2022

We are about to start work on phase 2 of the Chisholm Trail and would like to hear your views.

Over the past few months, the project team have been looking at the design of specific sections of the Trail including improving the on-road sections and identification of which junctions need improving.

The first two sections of the Trail we are looking to deliver are: –

Coldham’s Lane junction

Cromwell Road

Before we start work on these sections we would like to your views.

We had initially planned to engaging on Great Eastern Street car park alongside Coldham’s Lane junction and Cromwell Road.

Following further consideration, we now plan to undertake the engagement on the car park at the same time as we talk to residents about the rest of the Trail in this area. That can’t be done until we have reached agreement with Network Rail.

You have until midday on Tuesday 06 September 2022 to submit your feedback on the proposed plans for the areas in question.

The proposed plan for each area are available on our ConsultCambs engagement page. Please visit https://www.greatercambridge.org.uk/ChisholmTrailColdhamsCromwell where you can find further information, including maps of the proposed plans, and complete the survey should you wish.

Please note that the results of the “A new road classification for Cambridge” consultation may have the capacity to impact our proposals on Coldham’s Lane junction and Cromwell Road. Should the feedback from the consultation lead to changes to the area, we would ensure any appropriate changes are reflected into the Chisholm designs for these areas.

To stay up to date on the latest developments of phase 2 of the Chisholm Trail, please subscribe to the Chisholm Trail phase 2 updates via our website – Greater Cambridge Partnership (govdelivery.com)

SPRING 2022

On 17th March the GCP Executive Board resolved to:

• Endorse recommendations for public engagement on designs for Coldham’s Lane Junction, and Cromwell Road in Summer 2022 to further inform the design.

• Endorse recommendations for public engagement on designs for Great Eastern Street Car Park in Summer 2022 to further inform the design.

• Approve the land acquisition at Clifton Road.

• Approve plans for continued work in partnership with stakeholders and the landowners to develop a package of local mitigation to support the scheme.

• Approve the negotiation of land and rights required for the early delivery of the scheme including Compulsory Purchase and Side Road Orders as appropriate.

• Approve the further work on a Public Path Order to secure the links from Cromwell Road Shops into the Timber works development.

• Approve work for the further design of all other elements of the Chisholm Trail Phase 2.

The technical work to support this summer’s engagement on sections of the Trail is currently ongoing, and further details surrounding this will be communicated in due course.

SUMMER 2021

Phase 1 of the Chisholm Trail is approaching completion, and we have now started the planning work for Phase 2.

During this early design review stage, we are starting to talk to landowners and stakeholders. We will need their agreement to build phase 2 of the Trail as we will require access to land owned by Network Rail and others in order for the Trail to be completed.

We are also starting to look at the design elements of the Trail including improving the on road sections, which junctions need improving, and how we link the parts of the Trail that are close to the railway line with the other sections.

We want to deliver phase 2 as quickly as possible. The best way to do this is to deliver sections as the land that we need becomes available, rather than wait for everything to be agreed before we start.

The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture

CHISHOLM TRAIL.

In its time, the Chisholm Trail was considered to be one of the wonders of the western world. Herds with as many as ten thousand cattle were driven from Texas over the trail to Kansas. The trail acquired its name from trader Jesse Chisholm, a part-Cherokee, who just before the Civil War had built a trading post in what is now western Oklahoma City. Black Beaver, a Delaware Indian scout and friend of Chisholm, had led Union soldiers north into Kansas along part of the route after the federal government abandoned Indian Territory to the Confederates at the beginning of the Civil War.

During the Civil War, while many Texans were away fighting for the Confederacy, the cattle multiplied. By 1866 they were only worth four dollars per head in Texas. In the North and East they could be worth forty dollars per head. In 1866 some herds traveled the Shawnee Trail in eastern Oklahoma, but the woods and the region’s rough terrain discouraged trail driving.

In 1867 Joseph McCoy built stockyards on the Kansas-Pacific railroad in Abilene, Kansas. He sent men south to encourage Texas cattlemen to send herds to his stockyards. He also encouraged cattle buyers to come to Abilene, where cattle would be waiting. Drovers followed assorted minor trails through south and central Texas northward to the Red River crossing and then joined the Abilene Cattle Trail, which later became famous as the Chisholm Trail. It was so named at least by 1870 for trader Jesse Chisholm, who had operated a ranch near Wichita, Kansas, during the war. After being driven north along the Chisholm Trail to Abilene, the cattle were shipped east to the beef packers.

Herds varied in size from five hundred to ten thousand; however, they usually averaged from 2,500 to 3,000 head. A rancher entrusted his herd to a trail boss, who would hire ten to fourteen cowboys, a cook and wagon, and a wrangler (horse handler) for the 100 to 150 horses. The trail boss would also provision the wagon and plan the drive.

On the trail the cattle were watered in the morning, and then they slowly ate their way northward. The cowboys kept them from stopping, turning back, or leaving the herd. The herd would walk about ten miles per day, stopping only to water and eat. At night the herd would stop at a watering hole and bed down. These herds were less than ten miles apart and were spaced so that each herd could spend the night at a watering point. As a result of this spacing, if any problems occurred, the herds could stack up and time or cattle might be lost. At the Abilene railhead the trail boss would sell the cattle and horses, pay the cowboys, and return to Texas with the money for the owner, often repeating the trip year after year.

Eventually the Chisholm Trail would stretch eight hundred miles from South Texas to Fort Worth and on through Oklahoma to Kansas. The drives headed for Abilene from 1867 to 1871; later Newton and Wichita, Kansas became the end of the trail. The Cimarron cutoff on the north side of the Cimarron River allowed cattle to be driven to Dodge City, Kansas. From 1883 to 1887 herds headed up the trail to Caldwell, Kansas, making it the last great cow town on the trail.

The Chisholm Trail crossed from Texas over into Indian Territory at Red River Station, near present Ringgold, Texas, heading north. Along the way it passed Fleetwood Store, Blue Grove, Reid Store, Old Suggs Camp Ground and Tank, Monument Hill, Old Duncan Store, Cook Brothers Store, and Silver City on the South Canadian River. North of Silver City, the trail divided. The western route, primarily for freight and stages, curved slightly northwestward, ran through Concho, Fort Reno, and Kingfisher Stage Station, and then turned northeast. The eastern branch, used primarily for cattle, left Silver City, curved slightly northeastward, passed west of present Mustang, crossed through Yukon, and passed to the west of Piedmont, crossing the Cimarron where Kingfisher Creek joins that river. The eastern trail rejoined the western trail at Red Fork Ranch, or Dover Stage Stand, now the town of Dover. North of Dover the trail passed by Buffalo Springs Stage Station (near present Bison), Skeleton Ranch (near Enid), Sewell’s Ranch (near Jefferson), and Lone Tree (near Renfrow), before heading into Kansas south of Caldwell.

The biggest cattle trailing years were 1871 and 1873. After 1881 the drives diminished considerably. The range was fenced in the Cherokee Strip after 1884, an 1886 Kansas quarantine law (against Texas fever) prohibited the entry of Texas bovines, and in 1887 a blizzard destroyed most of the range cattle industry. The Land Run of 1889 into the Unassigned Lands opened central Oklahoma to settlement, peopling the plains with farmers, who built fences and towns. These factors ended the trail-drive era. An estimated six million cattle had traveled the Chisholm Trail during its life, giving rise to many cowboy legends that have survived.

From 1990 through 1997 Robert Klemme of Enid, Oklahoma, researched the route of the Chisholm Trail through Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas and planned to place four hundred concrete markers along the route across Oklahoma. The four hundredth marker was placed on Wilshire Road near Yukon in September 1997. Klemme erected other markers in Brownsville, Texas, and Abilene, Kansas. At the end of the twentieth century the Chisholm Trail remained visible at many places, including a spot near Bison, in Garfield County, 1.5 miles south of U.S. 81 and one-third mile west on a county road.

Chisholm Trail

The Chisholm Trail was the major route out of Texas for livestock. Although it was used only from 1867 to 1884, the longhorn cattle driven north along it provided a steady source of income that helped the impoverished state recover from the Civil War. Youthful trail hands on mustangs gave a Texas flavor to the entire range cattle industry of the Great Plains and made the cowboy an enduring folk hero.

When the Civil War ended, the state’s only potential assets were its countless longhorns, for which no market was available—Missouri and Kansas had closed their borders to Texas cattle in the 1850s because of the deadly Texas fever they carried. In the East was a growing demand for beef, and many men, among them Joseph G. McCoy of Illinois, sought ways of supplying it with Texas cattle. In the spring of 1867 he persuaded Kansas Pacific officials to lay a siding at the hamlet of Abilene, Kansas, on the edge of the quarantine area. He began building pens and loading facilities and sent word to Texas cowmen that a cattle market was available. That year he shipped 35,000 head; the number doubled each year until 1871, when 600,000 head glutted the market.

The first herd to follow the future Chisholm Trail to Abilene belonged to O. W. Wheeler and his partners, who in 1867 bought 2,400 steers in San Antonio. They planned to winter them on the plains, then trail them on to California. At the North Canadian River in Indian Territory they saw wagon tracks and followed them. The tracks were made by Scot-Cherokee Jesse Chisholm, who in 1864 began hauling trade goods to Indian camps about 220 miles south of his post near modern Wichita. At first the route was merely referred to as the Trail, the Kansas Trail, the Abilene Trail, or McCoy’s Trail. Though it was originally applied only to the trail north of the Red River, Texas cowmen soon gave Chisholm’s name to the entire trail from the Rio Grande to central Kansas. The earliest known references to the Chisholm Trail in print were in the Kansas Daily Commonwealth of May 27 and October 11, 1870. On April 28, 1874, the Denison, Texas, Daily News mentioned cattle going up “the famous Chisholm Trail.”

The herds followed the old Shawnee Trail by way of San Antonio, Austin, and Waco, where the trails split. The Chisholm Trail continued on to Fort Worth, then passed east of Decatur to the crossing at Red River Station. From Fort Worth to Newton, Kansas, U.S. Highway 81 follows the Chisholm Trail. It was, Wayne Gard observed, like a tree—the roots were the feeder trails from South Texas, the trunk was the main route from San Antonio across Indian Territory, and the branches were extensions to various railheads in Kansas. Between 1871, when Abilene ceased to be a cattle market, and 1884 the trail might end at Ellsworth, Junction City, Newton, Wichita, or Caldwell. The Western Trail by way of Fort Griffin and Doan’s Store ended at Dodge City.

The cattle did not follow a clearly defined trail except at river crossings; when dozens of herds were moving north it was necessary to spread them out to find grass. The animals were allowed to graze along for ten or twelve miles a day and never pushed except to reach water; cattle that ate and drank their fill were unlikely to stampede. When conditions were favorable longhorns actually gained weight on the trail. After trailing techniques were perfected, a trail boss, ten cowboys, a cook, and a horse wrangler could trail 2,500 cattle three months for sixty to seventy-five cents a head. This was far cheaper than shipping by rail.

The Chisholm Trail led to the new profession of trailing contractor. A few large ranchers such as Capt. Richard King and Abel (Shanghai) Pierce delivered their own stock, but trailing contractors handled the vast majority of herds. Among them were John T. Lytle and his partners, who trailed about 600,000 head. Others were George W. Slaughter and sons, Snyder Brothers, Blocker Brothers, and Pryor Brothers. In 1884 Pryor Brothers contracted to deliver 45,000 head, sending them in fifteen separate herds for a net profit of $20,000.

After the Plains tribes were subdued and the buffalo decimated, ranches sprang up all over the Plains; most were stocked with Texas longhorns and manned by Texas cowboys. Raising cattle on open range and free grass attracted investments from the East and abroad in partnerships such as that of Charles Goodnight and Irish financier John Adair or in ranching syndicates such as the Scottish Prairie Land and Cattle Company and the Matador Land and Cattle Company. Texas tried to outlaw alien land ownership but failed. The XIT Ranch arose when the Texas legislature granted the Capitol Syndicate of Chicago three million acres for building a new Capitol.

The Chisholm Trail was finally closed by barbed wire and an 1885 Kansas quarantine law; by 1884, its last year, it was open only as far as Caldwell, in southern Kansas. In its brief existence it had been followed by more than five million cattle and a million mustangs, the greatest migration of livestock in world history.

Texas Road Trip: the Chisholm Trail

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Last Updated on January 21, 2022 by Jim Ferri

A Texas cattle drive through Fort Worth on the old Chisholm Trail / photo: Anthony George via Flickr

For some Texans the Chisholm Trail is as historic as the Freedom Trail in New England…

Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

By Jim Ferri

For a Texas road trip, the Chisholm Trail is a great choice since the entire trail is of historical significance. For many the Trail is as significant as walking the Boston Freedom Trail in New England.

You may have heard of the Chisholm in your high-school history class or, more likely, in an old western movie. In fact, the Chisholm is the trail that made the American cowboy an enduring folk hero throughout the world.

It was used only from 1867 – 1884 before barbed wire and an 1885 quarantine law caused it to close. But during that time cowboys drove more than 5 million cattle and 1 million mustangs up it. It was the greatest migration of livestock in world history.

Sunset near Salado / photo: Steven via Flickr

Lots of History on This Texas Road Trip

On this Texas road trip it’s good to know a bit of history about the Chisholm Trail.

Following the South’s defeat in the Civil War, Texas Longhorns were a primary source of income for impoverished Texas. Thankfully, there was a demand for beef back east, and Texas had a growing supply. Also, the U.S. Government needed to feed Plains Indians on reservations and soldiers in forts.

Consequently, from 1867-1884 cattlemen drove their herds from all over southern Texas to San Antonio. From there they moved north to Fort Worth, and then on to a newly built rail head in Abilene, Kansas. Today San Antonio is a good place to start a Chisholm Trail road trip, as well. If you’re new to road trips, we have a few hints to help you along.

San Antonio’s Fiesta Flambeau Parade / photo: Visit San Anotnio

Start Your Trip in Either San Antonio or Cuero

There are numerous things to do in San Antonio (even if you’re on a budget) whether you’re following the Trail or just wandering about the city.

One thing to do is to visit the 19th-century Buckhorn Saloon and Museum. It has an eccentric collection of antlers, horns, and stuffed animals and buttermilk pie in its restaurant. Purportedly, Teddy Roosevelt and his Rough Riders used to visit the place. So did Pancho Villa, it’s said, who allegedly planned his revolution here.

This map shows the route from Cuero to St. Jo. It is interactive; press +/- to enlarge it or make it smaller. It can also be viewed, and the route followed, on your smartphone.

You’ll likely enjoy San Antonio’s Texas Pioneer, Trail Drivers, and Texas Rangers Memorial Museum. If you can, also drive to Cuero, 1½ hours east, where you’ll find the Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum.

Chisholm Trail Days at the Williamson Museum / photo: Williamson Museum

North to Georgetown

From San Antonio head north on I35 towards Georgetown, about a two-hour drive. (History buffs can stop in Austin where the Texas State Library has documents covering all phases of Texas history).

Historic Georgetown revels in the fact that four areas of the city are listed as National Register Historic Districts. Also of note is the Williamson Museum with its exhibits relating to the culture and heritage of Williamson County.

The museum hosts an annual Chisholm Trail Days Event at San Gabriel Park in October. It could be a good time to take a Texas road trip to coincide with the event. There’s also a Pioneer Day at Old Settlers Park in May. Both include hands-on educational programs, exhibits, and tours. Check with the museum for this year’s dates.

Bell County Museum / photo: Bell County Museum

Salado and Belton, Great Stops on the Trail

20 minutes north of Georgetown you’ll enter Salado, where Main Street was actually part of the Chisholm Trail. In fact, in one area of town ruts from wagon wheels still appear in the bedrock.

You may want to visit the 1861 Stage Coach Inn, which claims to be the oldest continuously operating Texas hotel. It was originally named the Shady Villa Inn and was a site on the Chisholm Trail.

Its guest book ostensibly included the signatures of Robert E. Lee, Sam Houston, General George Custer, Jesse James and others. One will never know, however, since the registers mysteriously disappeared years ago.

Leaving Salado, continue on I-35 for 12 miles, and you’ll come to Belton, the county seat of Bell County, TX. A tributary of the Chisholm Trail, it cut across the central part of the county.

Belton’s Bell County Museum celebrates the trail with the unique “Up the Chisholm Trail” monument. Its 17 bronze panels, three Longhorns, barbed wire, and Texas star represent various aspects of the history of the trail. It’s a unique, educational interpretation of a significant aspect of Texas history.

“Branding the Brazos” statues, Waco / photo: Waco CVB

Waco

Continue your Texas Road Trip up I-35 to Waco but exit the freeway before you reach the Brazos River.

Follow the river a few blocks westward to Indian Spring Park and the western approach of Waco’s Old Suspension Bridge. It’s the grand dame of the city.

Completed in 1870, it took 2.7 million bricks to construct and is really part of the Chisholm Trail. It was an easier crossing for drovers and their cattle than the sometimes-treacherous Brazos River below. Even so, back in those days paying the toll for a herd could often prove costly.

Near the western approach to the Waco Suspension Bridge, you’ll find the bronze sculpture “Branding the Brazos.” The larger-than-life artwork depicts three cowboys – a white, Hispanic and black – driving a herd of cattle to the bridge.

The sculpture, part of the Waco Chisholm Trail Heritage Monument, is now one of the most-photographed sites in the city. You’ll find it near the bridge in Indian Spring Park. Bring your kids and camera.

Fort Worth Stockyards barrel racing / photo: Stockyards Rodeo

Follow the Trail into Fort Worth

Continue on I-35 to Fort Worth, which served as a supply depot for the Chisholm Trail. It’s only a 1½-hour drive north, and chockablock with plenty of western history, memorabilia, and excitement.

Riding on the prairie

Your target here is the Stockyards National Historic District, where restored mercantile buildings and corrals preserve the city’s great past. It covers 15 square blocks filled with entertainment, restaurants, and shops.

Incredibly, there’s even a cattle drive down the main street, at 11:30 am and 4:30 pm daily. Authentic cowboys and cowgirls in period clothing from the Chisholm Trail era drive the herd.

There’s also the Cattle Raisers Museum, which will regale you with the history of the Texas ranching industry. Also visit Thistle Hill, the last surviving mansion of cattle baron era, only five miles away.

Additional places to visit include the National Cowgirl Museum/Hall of Fame, Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame, and Sid Richardson Collection of Western Art, among others.

You may also enjoy: Things to Do in San Antonio on a Budget / The Texas Panhandle – Route 66, the Cadillac Ranch and Buddy Holly / Cowboy Trail Rides Entice Las Vegas Visitors

If you haven’t yet had your fill of western action on your Texas road trip, join the crowds at the Stockyards Championship Rodeo. It’s held every Friday and Saturday night.

If you can break the kids away from the cowboys and cowgirls, you may also want to take a ride on the Grapevine Vintage Railroad.

Stonewall Saloon / photo: Texas Highways

End Your Texas Road Trip in Saint Jo

To follow the Chisholm Trail to the Oklahoma border on the Red River, continue on I-35 north to Gainsville. There take Route 82 west to Route 81 and the Red River.

En route, stop in little St. Jo (population 977) at the Stonewall Saloon. A welcome stop for thirsty drovers moving cattle along the Chisholm Trail, it was the first permanent structure in town. Today the saloon serves as a museum depicting the history of Saint Jo and the Chisholm Trail.

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Texas Time Travel

Bosque Collection, The Archives of the Bosque County Historical Commission101 North Main St.

Meridian, TX 76665

Texas Road Trip: The 8 Best Stops Along the Chisholm Trail

The Chisholm Trail, named for Indian trader and guide Jesse Chisholm, was the primary route for cattle and longhorns heading north to the Kansas cattle market from south Texas between 1867 to 1885. More than five million cattle and a million mustangs completed the most remarkable livestock migration in world history. Let’s explore the Chisholm Trail, then and now, from Kingsville to Fort Worth, and points in between.

1. Kingsville

Kingsville, southwest of Corpus Christi, is known for its small-town charm and Texas-sized pride. The King Ranch, sitting on 825,000 acres, an area larger than Rhode Island, is a National Historic Landmark and offers daily ranch history tours. Founded by Henrietta M. King and named after her husband, Captain Richard King, Kingsville is a leading center for ranching, trade, technology, and industry. In a restored icehouse near downtown, the King Ranch Museum displays photographs of the famous vaqueros and ranch life in the 1930s and ’40s. The 1904 Train Depot Museum takes you back to the local railroad system, linking Corpus Christi to Brownsville, which helped establish Kingsville as a trading center in South Texas.

For birding, visit the resident tropical birds in South Texas, from wetland to grasslands, including the vermillion flycatcher, green jay, crested caracara, and more.

Editor’s Note: If you’re new to birding, our own Sue Reddel and Diana Laskaris have some tips for planning the best birding trip.

Pro Tip: Stay at Birds of Paradise Inn and Gardens, about 17 miles southeast of Kingsville on the serene Baffin Bay. It’s cozy and out of the way, has fully equipped kitchens, and is great for birding and fishing.

2. Corpus Christi, The Gulf Coast Capital

In Chisholm Trail days, Nueces County flourished with over 56,000 cattle and 10 meat packing plants, making Corpus Christi the main gulf port that shipped cattle to New Orleans.

Get your See You Soon CC Attractions Pass and learn more about the cattle industry at the Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History, one of five attractions included in your pass. See the USS Lexington Museum, the WWII aircraft carrier with ship tours and an expansive flight deck.

You’ll see sharks and stingrays, dolphins, birds, and turtles at the Texas State Aquarium on the North Shore. Get a bite to eat at the Pepsi Shoreline Grill or get wet at the H-E-B Splash Park. Explore nature trails and floral gardens on the south side at the South Texas Botanical Gardens and Nature Center. Located in the Bayfront/Downtown area, see the Art Museum of South Texas with a waterfront view.

Get up close and personal with the sea turtles at Padre Island National Seashore, the most extended undeveloped barrier island globally and the most essential U. S. nesting beach for the endangered Kemp’s Ridley sea turtles.

Pro Tip: I love staying at the Omni Hotel in the downtown Marina District with beautiful bay views. Dine at the Republic of Texas Bar and Grill for chef-prepared fresh seafood and prime cuts.

3. San Antonio

Many cattle herds started their long journey around San Antonio, a gathering location for the critical local cattle industry. See local exhibits and artifacts and learn more about Texas cowboy life at the Witte Museum and Buckhorn Saloon and Museum.

The San Antonio River Walk is the number one attraction in Texas. Don’t hesitate to splurge for a River Walk hotel with a river view. Be sure to visit El Mercado and La Villita Historic Village near the downtown River Walk. Visit the museums along the Museum Reach and the Spanish missions that date back to the 1600s along the Mission Reach River Walk Trail.

Editor’s Note: There’s even more to this attraction. Janie has you covered with the best restaurants and hotels and the best overall experiences on the San Antonio River Walk.

Pro Tip: I like to stay at the St. Anthony Luxury Collection Hotel just off the River Walk or the Hotel Contessa, with the Las Ramblas Restaurant for gourmet eats and the Cork Bar for daily happy hours.

4. Lockhart

Two herding routes converged in Lockhart, and on some days, five to six thousand heads of cattle passed along this outpost during the old Chisholm Trail days.

Today, Lockhart, northeast of San Antonio, is the Barbecue Capital of Texas. Black’s Barbecue, since 1932, is one of the oldest barbecue restaurants in Texas. In the 1960s, President Lyndon Johnson asked Black’s to cater barbecued sausage, and it was served on the U.S. Capitol grounds in front of the Smithsonian Institute.

Kreuz Market (pronounced Krites) serves beef, sausage, and pork on brown butcher paper with no sides. Enjoy cheddar cheese, tomatoes, onion, and avocado with your favorite beverage. Don’t ask for barbecue sauce here. The owners say “good barbecue doesn’t need the sauce.”

Floyd Wilhelm opened Chisholm Trail BBQ in 1978 after selling his boat to start up his business. Order by the pound, family packs, plate lunches, sandwiches, sides, and desserts like brownies, pecan pie, or homemade banana pudding. The daughter of Edgar “Smitty” Schmidt opened Smitty’s Market in October 1999, serving their barbeque on brown paper with all the same fixings, plus Grandpa Smitty’s secret recipe — beans!

Pro Tip: After antiques shopping along Main Street, take a selfie in front of the historic Caldwell County Courthouse.

5. Austin, The Texas Capital

Cattle herds crossed the Colorado River near Austin. One of the herders, Colonel Jesse Driskill, settled in Austin, bought an entire city block for $7,500, and opened the Driskill Hotel in 1886. The Driskill is still a legendary Austin landmark offering luxurious accommodations.

Visit the Texas State Capitol Building, which is 14 feet taller than the United States Capitol. When you walk into the grand rotunda, look down to see the seals of the six countries that have governed Texas, then look up to the beautiful dome. Opened in 2001, the Bob Bullock Museum is the state’s official history museum, honoring Bullock, the 38th lieutenant governor of Texas.

See the Elizabet Ney Museum, a tribute to an early leader in the Texas Women’s Movement, with the sculptures of world figures on display. Catch live music at Austin City Limits at the Moody Theatre or Antone’s for blues. Spend a day on the water at Lake Austin or Lake Travis with Keep Austin Wet, who will provide a professional crew and mandatory captain to keep you entertained.

Pro Tip: Enjoy dinner at Jeffrey’s with prime steaks, king crab and avocado toast, lobster bisque, and chocolate souffle with salted caramel anglaise.

6. Round Rock

Cattle herds continued north of Austin by crossing Brushy Creek near the famous circular limestone rock that marked the lower-water crossing near Round Rock. Stop at Chisholm Trail Crossing Park with scenes of the old cattle drive. A gunfight between train robber Sam Bass and Texas Ranger A.W. Grimes called the “Sam Bass Shoutout” resulted in Sam’s capture and death. Find his grave in the Round Rock Cemetery northwest of Old Town.

See the historic, Victorian Woodbine Mansion, constructed 1895-1900, home for weddings and social events. Other historical architectures in Round Rock built between 1876 and 1881 tell an ongoing story of the old days.

Pro Tip: Kalahari Resorts is America’s largest indoor water park with 14 restaurants, bars, ice cream shops, and coffee, plus luxury accommodations. It’s huge!

7. Waco

In 1870, the Waco Suspension Bridge, a National Historic Landmark, provided a costly but convenient bridge for cattle herds to cross the Brazos River in Waco. A sculpture of trail riders near the bridge still honors the famous Chisholm Trail.

Visit the Magnolia Market and Silos, of Chip and Joanna Gaines fame. Waco is home to the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum, Baylor University, and the Dr. Pepper Museum. Visit Cameron Park with the zoo, Lovers Leap, Jacob’s Ladder, and more. Ride the Silo District Trolley to explore the downtown cultural district’s restaurants, art galleries, boutiques, wineries, and famed farmers market.

Pro Tip: Stay at the Magnolia House and eat at Magnolia Table, but get there early to avoid the lines.

8. Fort Worth

Fort Worth was the last main stop for rest, raucous behavior, and restocking of supplies before heading into Native American territory along the Chisholm Trail. Today, the Fort Worth Herd, the only twice-daily longhorn cattle drive, commemorates the old Chisholm Trail, and it goes right down Exchange Boulevard.

Visit the Fort Worth Stockyards and be transported back to Cowtown history. Stay at the new Drover Hotel beginning in March, dance the two-step at Billy Bob’s, the world’s largest honky-tonk, and dine at Chef Tim Love’s Lonesome Dove restaurant. Stroll the new Mule Alley with stores, restaurants, entertainment venues, and a winery. Shop for Lucchese boots and Stetson hats on Main Street and sit astride a saddle at Booger Red’s saloon in the Stockyards Hotel.

Sundance Square anchors the downtown Fort Worth area with numerous hotels, restaurants like Reata and Toro Toro, and entertainment venues, including the Bass Performance Hall and Jubilee Theater.

Pro Tips: Visit the Fort Worth Zoo, the number one zoo in the nation! And, as Will Rogers once said, “Always drink upstream from the herd.”

Editor’s Note: For more Texas inspiration, consider our picks for Best Of Texas: From Big And Bold To Quaint And Charming, These TX Towns Deserve A Visit. For more on the Chisolm Trail, see our source for the info provided in the first paragraph of this article here.

Chisholm Trail

Historic trail in the central United States used for cattle drives

1873 Map of Chisholm Trail with Subsidiary Trails in Texas (from Kansas Historical Society

The Chisholm Trail was a trail used in the post-Civil War era to drive cattle overland from ranches in Texas to Kansas railheads. The trail was established by Black Beaver, a Lenape guide and rancher, and his friend Jesse Chisholm, a Cherokee merchant. They collected and drove numerous cattle along the trail to Kansas, where they could be shipped east to achieve higher prices. The southern terminus was Red River Station, a trading post near the Red River along the northern border of Texas. The northern terminus was a trading post near Kansas City, Kansas. Chisholm owned both of these posts. In the years of the cattle drives, cowboys would drive large herds from ranches across Texas to the Red River Station and then north to Kansas City.

Overview [ edit ]

Texas ranchers using the Chisholm Trail had their cowboys start cattle drives from either the Rio Grande area or San Antonio. They joined the Chisholm Trail at the Red River, at the border between Texas and Oklahoma Territory. They continued north to the rail head of the Kansas Pacific Railway in Abilene, Kansas, where the cattle would be sold and shipped eastward. The trail is named for Jesse Chisholm, a multiracial trader from Tennessee of half Cherokee descent. Together with scout Black Beaver, he developed the trail to transport his goods from one trading post to another. The two men were the first to drive cattle north along this route.[1]

Business aspects [ edit ]

By 1853, Texas cattle were being driven into Missouri. Local farmers began blocking the herds and turning them back because the Texas Longhorns carried ticks that caused diseases in other species of cattle. Violence, vigilante groups, and cattle rustling caused further problems for the drovers. By 1859, the driving of cattle was outlawed in many Missouri jurisdictions. By the end of the Civil War, most cattle were being moved up the western branch of trail, being gathered at Red River Station in Montague County, Texas.

In 1866, cattle in Texas were worth $4 per head, compared to over $40 per head in the North and East. Lack of market access during the Civil War had produced an overstock of cattle in Texas. In 1867, Joseph G. McCoy built stockyards in Abilene, Kansas. He encouraged Texas cattlemen to drive their herds to his stockyards. O. W. Wheeler answered McCoy’s call, and he along with partners used the Chisholm Trail to bring a herd of 2,400 head from Texas to Abilene. This herd was the first of an estimated 5,000,000 head of Texas cattle to reach Kansas over the Chisholm Trail.[2][3] McCoy’s stockyards shipped 35,000 head in 1867 and became the largest stockyards west of Kansas City, Kansas.

The construction of the Union Pacific Railway through Nebraska eventually offered a cattle drive destination that was an attractive alternative to the Kansas Pacific Railroad. The Texas Trail emerged as an alternative to the Chisholm Trail. Between 1876 and 1884 some drives went along the Texas Trail instead of the Chisholm Trail.[4]

Route [ edit ]

In Texas, hundreds of feeder trails headed north to one of the main cattle trails. In the early 1840s, most cattle were driven up the Shawnee Trail. The Chisholm Trail was previously used by Indian hunting and raiding parties; the trail crossed into Indian Territory (present-day west-central Oklahoma) near Red River Station and entered Kansas near Caldwell. Through Oklahoma, the route of U.S. Highway 81 follows the Chisholm Trail through present-day towns of El Reno, Duncan, Chickasha, and Enid.[5]

Historians consider the Chisholm Trail to have started either at Donna or San Antonio. From 1867 to 1871, the trail ended in Abilene, Kansas, but as railroads incrementally built southward, the end of the trail moved to other cities. The end of the trail moved to Newton and soon afterward to Wichita. From 1883 to 1887, the end of the trail was at Caldwell.

Challenges [ edit ]

On the long trips—up to two months—the cattlemen faced many difficulties. They had to cross major rivers such as the Arkansas and the Red and innumerable smaller creeks, as well as handle the topographic challenges of canyons, badlands and low mountain ranges. The major drives typically needed to start in the spring after the rains stimulated the growth of green grasses for the grazing cattle. The spring drives, with those rains and higher water levels with the runoff, always meant more danger at the river crossings, which had no bridges. The half-wild Texas Longhorn cattle were contrary and prone to stampede with little provocation.

The days of longest sunlight, near mid-June, were also an important consideration in the timing of drives. In addition to natural dangers, the cowboys and drovers encountered rustlers and occasional conflicts with Native Americans. The cattle drives disrupted the hunting and cultivation of crops in Indian Territory. Tribal members demanded that the trail bosses pay a toll of 10 cents per head to local tribes for the right to cross Indian lands (Oklahoma at that time was Indian Territory, governed from Fort Smith, Arkansas).

The only woman known to run her own cattle drive traveled from Texas to Wichita using the Chisholm Trail. Margaret Borland took her family, hired hands, and 2,500 Longhorns through the trail in 1873 in search of profit for her cattle, which was worth triple in Kansas over Texas prices. She died from what was called trail fever just after arriving in Wichita, after an otherwise successful journey.

Representation in media [ edit ]

The cattle drives have been a popular topic among Western genre movies. At least 27 movies have portrayed fictional accounts of the first drive along the Chisholm Trail, including The Texans (1938), directed by James P. Hogan and starring Randolph Scott and Joan Bennett; and Red River (1948), directed by Howard Hawks and starring John Wayne and Montgomery Clift. Walter Brennan co-starred in both films.

The trail is the subject of at least two pop songs: “The Last Cowboy Song,” written and recorded by Ed Bruce, also performed by The Highwaymen; and the song “The Old Chisholm Trail.” Among those who have covered the song are Gene Autry, Girls of the Golden West, Woody Guthrie, Michael Martin Murphey, Tex Ritter, and Roy Rogers. Lead Belly (Huddie Ledbetter) also covered this song, although his version was titled “When I Was A Cowboy”. Nova Scotia-born Wilf Carter recorded a version of the song, titled, “Come A Ty-ya Yippie Yi Yo”.

Legacy [ edit ]

In 1964, Texas rancher Charles Schreiner III founded the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America. The next year, he conducted a cattle drive from San Antonio to Dodge City with a stop at the LBJ Ranch in Gillespie County, home of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. The drive was promoted as a centennial commemoration of the original Chisholm Trail drives.[6]

Many schools in this region have been named after the Chisholm Trail, including:

The Chisholm Trail is roughly traced by U.S. Route 81 through Oklahoma, and that state has multiple museums and sites paying respect to the trail.[11] The Chisholm Trail Heritage Center in Duncan, Oklahoma has educational and interactive exhibits, a large monument depicting a scene from a Chisholm Trail cattle drive, and a trail walkway.[11][12] Trail Ruts at Monument Hill just outside of Duncan has visible traces of cattle hoofs and wagons actually left on the trail.[11] Kingfisher, Oklahoma, has a life-size statue of Jesse Chisholm in the middle of downtown, as well as the Chisholm Trail Museum and Governor Shea Mansion which gives a clear timeline of the trail.[11] Yukon, Oklahoma, has the Chisholm Trail Watering Hole and historic marker, while Jesse Chisholm’s gravesite is a bit further north outside Geary, Oklahoma.[11] A mural in Enid, Oklahoma depicting the trail is located in the downtown area.[11]

Lockhart, Texas, in Caldwell County, holds a four-day festival on the second weekend of June, to celebrate its place on the Chisholm Trail. Newton, Kansas holds a three- to four-day Chisholm Trail Festival, combining it with the annual Fourth of July celebration. On September 26, 2009, a historical marker on the Chisholm Trail was unveiled at the site of Red River Station in Montague County. The 5.5-foot concrete marker is the last of 12 erected in Montague County as part of a joint project of the Texas Lakes and Trails and the Montague County Historical Commission to define the Chisholm Trail in this area (as said in Wichita Falls Times Record News).

In 2014, the North Texas Tollway Authority constructed a 26-mile-long toll road named after the trail, the Chisholm Trail Parkway. It connects downtown Fort Worth to the nearby city of Cleburne in Johnson County. In 2017, the Texas Historical Commission released The Chisholm Trail: Exploring the Folklore and Legacy, an online tour and mobile app.[13] The tour includes audio tracks and short videos that retell the history of communities and local heritage in towns and cities that line the route of the former Chisholm Trail.

References [ edit ]

Further reading [ edit ]

Guide Map of the Best and Shortest Cattle Trail to the Kansas Pacific Railway ; Kansas Pacific Railway Company; 1875. (Read Online)(Map)

; Kansas Pacific Railway Company; 1875. Morality and Money: A Look at how the Respectable Community Battled the Sporting Community over Prostitution in Kansas Cowtowns, 1867-1885; Jessica Smith; Kansas State University; 2013. Read Online

Chisholm Trail

PROJECT UPDATE PHASE 2

SUMMER 2022

We are about to start work on phase 2 of the Chisholm Trail and would like to hear your views.

Over the past few months, the project team have been looking at the design of specific sections of the Trail including improving the on-road sections and identification of which junctions need improving.

The first two sections of the Trail we are looking to deliver are: –

Coldham’s Lane junction

Cromwell Road

Before we start work on these sections we would like to your views.

We had initially planned to engaging on Great Eastern Street car park alongside Coldham’s Lane junction and Cromwell Road.

Following further consideration, we now plan to undertake the engagement on the car park at the same time as we talk to residents about the rest of the Trail in this area. That can’t be done until we have reached agreement with Network Rail.

You have until midday on Tuesday 06 September 2022 to submit your feedback on the proposed plans for the areas in question.

The proposed plan for each area are available on our ConsultCambs engagement page. Please visit https://www.greatercambridge.org.uk/ChisholmTrailColdhamsCromwell where you can find further information, including maps of the proposed plans, and complete the survey should you wish.

Please note that the results of the “A new road classification for Cambridge” consultation may have the capacity to impact our proposals on Coldham’s Lane junction and Cromwell Road. Should the feedback from the consultation lead to changes to the area, we would ensure any appropriate changes are reflected into the Chisholm designs for these areas.

To stay up to date on the latest developments of phase 2 of the Chisholm Trail, please subscribe to the Chisholm Trail phase 2 updates via our website – Greater Cambridge Partnership (govdelivery.com)

SPRING 2022

On 17th March the GCP Executive Board resolved to:

• Endorse recommendations for public engagement on designs for Coldham’s Lane Junction, and Cromwell Road in Summer 2022 to further inform the design.

• Endorse recommendations for public engagement on designs for Great Eastern Street Car Park in Summer 2022 to further inform the design.

• Approve the land acquisition at Clifton Road.

• Approve plans for continued work in partnership with stakeholders and the landowners to develop a package of local mitigation to support the scheme.

• Approve the negotiation of land and rights required for the early delivery of the scheme including Compulsory Purchase and Side Road Orders as appropriate.

• Approve the further work on a Public Path Order to secure the links from Cromwell Road Shops into the Timber works development.

• Approve work for the further design of all other elements of the Chisholm Trail Phase 2.

The technical work to support this summer’s engagement on sections of the Trail is currently ongoing, and further details surrounding this will be communicated in due course.

SUMMER 2021

Phase 1 of the Chisholm Trail is approaching completion, and we have now started the planning work for Phase 2.

During this early design review stage, we are starting to talk to landowners and stakeholders. We will need their agreement to build phase 2 of the Trail as we will require access to land owned by Network Rail and others in order for the Trail to be completed.

We are also starting to look at the design elements of the Trail including improving the on road sections, which junctions need improving, and how we link the parts of the Trail that are close to the railway line with the other sections.

We want to deliver phase 2 as quickly as possible. The best way to do this is to deliver sections as the land that we need becomes available, rather than wait for everything to be agreed before we start.

Enid and the Chisholm Trail

The Chisholm Trail was the superhighway of its day, the 1800’s version of I-35. Cowboys drove millions of cattle from Texas through Oklahoma to the Kansas railheads from 1867-1887 for shipment to the East Coast, where cattle prices were as much as 10 times higher than they were in Texas.

The Chisholm Trail rolled through the heart of what we now know as Enid, and while our city and many others along the trail celebrated the 150th anniversary of the Chisholm Trail in 2017, that doesn’t mean the trail has gone away. You can still come to Enid and see all we’ve done to recognize the Chisholm Trail as an important event in our nation’s history.

You can now drive the Chisholm Trail through Enid thanks to the City of Enid painting hoofprints on streets where the Trail passed. See the story here.

It’s Enid’s chance to also recognize the late Bob Klemme (right), the Chisholm Trail historian who made it his personal mission to keep the memory of the trail alive for future generations by making and placing over 400 concrete markers in Oklahoma wherever the Chisholm Trail crossed a section line.

Beside’s Mr. Klemme’s markers, Enid has a piece of public art that depicts life on the Chisholm Trail. “The Trail,” was dedicated on Bob Klemme’s birthday, December 15, 2016, at the corner of Grand and Maine on the Garfield Furniture mattress store building. This location sits directly on the Chisholm Trail, and the cowboy on the horse guiding the herd is Bob Klemme, just another way Enid recognizes all he did to preserve the history of the Chisholm Trail.

The Enid Television Network has produced an outstanding video tribute featuring Bob Klemme telling his story of marking the Chisholm Trail as well as the story behind “The Trail” mural. View this video tribute here.

We also encourage you to visit Ruth Monro Augur’s Murals inside the Garfield County Courthouse, just one block north of “The Trail.” These murals were painted in the 1930s and portrays a fascinating depiction of life in this region from before white men lived on the Plains through the Great Land Run of 1893 and includes a mural of the Chisholm Trail. Click on the link to learn more about these fabulous murals.

The Enid Welcome Center has Chisholm Trail 150 memorabilia available, including a custom coin, handcrafted wood ornaments and stoneware mugs marking this historic anniversary. Also available is “Guardian of the Chisholm Trail,” a documentary DVD and audio travel guide CD featuring Bob Klemme and the Chisholm Trail as it passed through what is now Garfield County. We’re located at 201 W Garriott.

Visit ChisholmTrail150.org, a website dedicated to detailing the history of the Chisholm Trail

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