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Can You Travel Abroad With A Felony Conviction | Can Felons Travel Abroad? Quick Answer

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Convicted felons may face travel restrictions that limit their ability to move freely. However, in most cases, felons that have served their sentence can enter other countries, assuming they have a valid passport. There are exceptions to this, with some countries explicitly prohibiting the ability of felons to enter.In the end, getting into Europe with a criminal record is not as problematic as some other territories, as long as the offences are not serious. The best option for citizens of eligible countries will be to get the ETIAS visa waiver before traveling to Europe once it becomes available.Can Felons Travel Outside the U.S.? Assuming you are a U.S. citizen, you should not have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport or traveling outside the U.S. with a felony conviction on your record.

You can travel to the following countries if you are a convicted felon:
  • Brazil.
  • Cambodia.
  • Chile.
  • Egypt.
  • Ethiopia.
  • Hong Kong.
  • Indonesia.
  • Ireland.

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In today’s video, I’m answering the question of whether or not Felons can travel abroad? This has been asked to me many times, so here’s a video addressing it. The short answer is yes, felons can travel but… there are so things that need to be in order first. Those that are on probation or parole, can’t travel without permission. Those that owe more than $2,500 in child support will be denied a passport. See this video to get the full details.

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Can Felons Travel Abroad?

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  • Author: David Darang
  • Views: 3,692 views
  • Likes: 555325 Like
  • Date Published: Nov 16, 2020
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syVqHITD2N8

What countries can you travel to if you have a felony?

You can travel to the following countries if you are a convicted felon:
  • Brazil.
  • Cambodia.
  • Chile.
  • Egypt.
  • Ethiopia.
  • Hong Kong.
  • Indonesia.
  • Ireland.

Can I travel to Europe with a felony?

In the end, getting into Europe with a criminal record is not as problematic as some other territories, as long as the offences are not serious. The best option for citizens of eligible countries will be to get the ETIAS visa waiver before traveling to Europe once it becomes available.

Can someone with a felony travel outside the US?

Can Felons Travel Outside the U.S.? Assuming you are a U.S. citizen, you should not have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport or traveling outside the U.S. with a felony conviction on your record.

What felonies disqualify you from getting a passport?

What felonies can prevent you from getting a passport? Under federal law 22 U.S.C. 2714, drug-related felonies as well as some drug-related misdemeanors will cause you to be ineligible to receive a U.S. passport.

Can you go to Mexico if you have a felony?

Prior Criminal Convictions: U.S. citizens should be aware that Mexican law permits immigration authorities to deny foreigners entry into Mexico if they have been charged or convicted of a serious crime in Mexico or elsewhere.

Can you go to Spain with a felony?

However, anyone with a criminal record for more serious or recent crimes may face additional entry restrictions or a travel ban. In all cases, foreign visitors with a criminal record need to apply for ETIAS for Spain (if eligible) or a Spanish visa.

Can you go to Dubai with a felony?

Traveling to Dubai

The only restriction for them flying would be if they have a felony warrant outstanding against them. The other possible issue would be if their name is on what is called the no-fly list maintained by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) for those suspected of being terrorists.

Can a felon go to Canada?

Any American that has a felony conviction on their criminal record may not be permitted entry into Canada unless they have received special permission from the Canadian Government.

Can I go to Jamaica with a felony?

Visit the Embassy of Jamaica web site for the most current visa information. Jamaican law prohibits entry by all persons convicted of a felony and still under community supervision.

Can felons go to the Bahamas?

Unless the Bahamas was notified of his crime (unlikely), there should be no issue. The Bahamas immigration form does not ask if you have any convictions and unless the immigration officer has reason to ask, it is not a question you are likley to be asked.

Can a felon travel to Bora Bora?

Felons may have served time in prison, but they have the same interests as any other U.S. citizen. Traveling to Bora Bora is no exception.

Can Felons Leave the Country?

Convicted felons may face travel restrictions that limit their ability to move freely. However, in most cases, felons that have served their sentence can enter other countries, assuming they have a valid passport. There are exceptions to this, with some countries explicitly prohibiting the ability of felons to enter. In this article, we provide more information on felons leaving the country, below you’ll find more detailed information on countries that don’t allow felons.

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Can a Convicted Felon Leave the Country?

Whether or not a convicted felon can leave the country depends on several things:

Whether or not the felon has completed their sentence. The nature of the crime on their criminal record. The travel restrictions imposed by the country in question.

Restrictions of Travel During Probation

In many cases, convicted felons will be sentenced to imprisonment. They have to complete their sentence before they are free to travel. In other cases, felons are sentenced to a probation period and fines rather than prison time. When a felon is still serving their probation, there will be restrictions on their movement. These limitations depend on the conditions of their probation, which is determined by the nature of the crime.

For example, felons on probation need to report to a probation officer regularly to check that they are sticking to the terms of their sentence. This would be impossible if the convict was abroad or in another state at the time of the meeting. If the felon does wish to travel, they can only do this with the permission of their probation officer. Again, whether or not this will be granted depends on the nature of the crime they committed. Once the probation period has been fulfilled, travel restrictions ease.

Restrictions of Travel After Serving Your Sentence

Once the felon has served their sentence, be that probation, imprisonment, or parole as determined by court order, most can travel freely. However, to do so, they must obtain a valid passport. Most felons can get a US passport without any issue, but this does depend on the conviction and current financial status of the individual. Under federal law, the State Department cannot issue a passport if any of the following apply:

The person was convicted of a felony drug charge that involved crossing international borders.

The felon committed a crime that plotted against the US government.

The individual owes over $2,500 in outstanding child support or government loans.

The felon has active warrants against them.

Once the felon has a valid passport, traveling becomes easier. However, whereas they will not run into any problems moving around the US, they may face issues trying to enter other countries. Their passport is a form of international identification and will always allow the person back into the United States, but it does not guarantee entry into another country. Few countries ban felons that have committed serious crimes.

Note, depending on where you want to travel, some countries require US citizens to acquire visas before entry, alongside their passports. While many US felons can get a passport, getting a visa can be more challenging. When applying for a visa, you must tell the truth about past convictions. Anyone found lying could get a permanent travel ban on their record.

Are There Countries That Don’t Allow Felons?

The answer to the question “Are felons allowed to leave the country?” largely depends on which country the felon wants to enter. To find out whether or not a country imposes restrictions on felons, the immigration policies of the country in question need to be looked at. For most countries, the acceptance or denial of entry depends on the crime in question, with certain offenses such as crimes of a violent nature causing the most limitations.

Below we look at the entry conditions of some countries many US residents want to visit.

The United Kingdom

Any US felon can enter the United Kingdom if their conviction is considered spent. Spent convictions refer to those that happened over 10 years ago if the prison sentence was between six and 30 months. In cases where the prison sentence was over 30 months, the conviction can never be spent. This means felons that have committed more serious crimes and thus received larger and harsher sentences might struggle to gain entry to the country.

The European Union

The majority of European countries are part of the European Union (EU). There is free movement between all EU countries, meaning if a felon can enter any one of them they will be granted access to all others as well. The EU is pretty lenient in allowing a person with a previous felony conviction into the country. As long as the prison sentence was less than three years, most felons will be allowed in. The exception is if the crime involved trafficking people or drugs, which have a two-year prison sentence limitation.

Canada

Canada has strict entry requirements and is one of the only countries that ban the entry of almost all felons. Indeed, no felon can pass through the border without special permission and people will be stopped even for an old felony arrest on record. They are particularly strict on individuals with an arrest or conviction for driving under the influence (DUI), regardless of whether they were charged with a misdemeanor or felony offense.

If you wish to enter Canada, you need to submit a request for rehabilitation. This is true even if the crime and conviction happened 10 plus years ago. In Canada, a felony is never overlooked automatically after a designated period has passed. To be deemed rehabilitated, the felon must not be involved in any current criminal activity. However, it is solely down to the authorities to decide whether the felon is deemed safe. If not, travel is not permitted.

Australia

According to Australian legislation, a visa will only be granted to people that do not have any convictions that resulted in prison sentences of longer than 12 months. This means that felons with longer sentences will struggle to gain a visa and thus access to the country. They also won’t allow anyone to enter that has been convicted of two or more offenses whose combined sentences total more than 12 months or anyone with a suspended prison sentence of this length.

Conclusions

The rules on felons leaving the country depend on whether or not their sentence has been served. When it has, most convicted felons will be able to apply for a passport that allows them to leave the US. The exception is people with drug trafficking offenses or crimes that pose a security threat to the US, or those with outstanding debts for $2,500 or greater.

However, the ability to leave the US does not guarantee entry into the country of question. Always check the country’s immigration policies before traveling, and never lie on visa applications. This could result in a permanent travel ban to the county.

Travel to Europe with a criminal record

Having a criminal record can prohibit a person from doing many things in life, including travelling to certain counties. But while entry restrictions against criminal offenders are incredibly strict in countries like the USA and Canada, the rules in most European countries are far more relaxed. European criminal conviction checks are uncommon, and most EU borders have employed other security measures, including the introduction of the ETIAS visa waiver program.

Can someone with a criminal record travel to Europe?

Many countries in the world have strict no-admission policies for foreign visitors with criminal records, especially for violent or serious crimes. In the United States, travellers can be denied entry even if they have a minor criminal conviction from as far back as 50 years prior.

In comparison, European countries and especially the Schengen Area countries have far more relaxed rules surrounding entry for travellers with a criminal record. In general, visitors to the Schengen Area will not receive a European criminal conviction check at border control.

However, it is important to tell the truth if asked about a criminal record by a border official or on a form. Minor criminal offences should not prohibit entry to the Schengen Area. Travellers who have served 3 years in prison or more, or who have been convicted of illegal smuggling or drug offences with a 2-year prison term or more, are likely to be refused visa entry.

What European countries can I visit with a criminal record?

Although most European countries will not refuse entry for prior criminal offences, some have stricter policies, while others are even more relaxed. For example, the UK allows entry for the concept of “spent” convictions, which means that any conviction with a prison term between 6 and 30 months, served more than 10 years previously, does not need to be declared.

On the other end of the spectrum, Germany has its own specific rules regarding criminal records. Those convicted of a public order violation with jail time of more than 3 years, drug-related crimes with prison sentences of more than 2 years or any kind of human trafficking offense will be refused entry. Lying to a border official is also immediate grounds for rejection. However, like many other EU member states, German officials will be more concerned with crimes committed within their own borders or in other EU countries.

How can European countries detect criminal history?

While European countries are largely unconcerned with minor offences committed outside EU borders, crimes registered within the EU are another matter. Since 2012, all EU countries have been connected to ECRIS, the European Criminal Records Information System.

This shared database was created in order to improve the exchange of information about criminal convictions in the European Union. In addition to allowing local security forces easy access to the full record of any previous convictions across the EU, it also takes away the possibility of escaping convictions by relocating to a different EU country. Therefore, it is important to tell the truth about any EU criminal record attached to the passport of the traveller.

Currently, ECRIS is used around 3 million times a year to exchange information of previous criminal convictions. A criminal record is shared in around 30% of the cases when one is requested. These requests are normally made during criminal proceedings or when someone applies for certain authorised purposes, such as a firearms licence or working with children.

Apply for the ETIAS visa waiver with a criminal record

The ETIAS visa waiver will launch in 2023 and it will become a requirement for many nationalities which can currently enter the Schengen Area without any form of travel authorisation.

On the ETIAS application for there will be some security questions regarding criminal activity and all applicants will be screened by eU-LISA (the department of the EU responsible for criminal data management). However, the EU have made it clear that only those responsible for serious crime or terrorism will be denied an ETIAS visa waiver.

The ETIAS visa waiver is being implemented in order to provide a better travel experience to third-country nationals, and to improve border control against terrorist and other security threats and will be available for 60 eligible countries. Applicants will have to complete a simple ETIAS application online, filling in personal data and details about travel plans. Once approved, the ETIAS will be received by email and the applicant can print a copy of their travel authorisation to Europe to present at border control.

In this regard, it is of the utmost importance to understand that ETIAS is a visa waiver, which is not the same as a visa.

In the end, getting into Europe with a criminal record is not as problematic as some other territories, as long as the offences are not serious. The best option for citizens of eligible countries will be to get the ETIAS visa waiver before traveling to Europe once it becomes available.

Traveling Overseas With a Felony On Your Record

If you’re like a lot of U.S. citizens, at some point you’ll want or need to travel outside the United States. Perhaps you’ll want to go to Italy for your honeymoon or you’ll want to go to South America for a mission trip for your church.

Perhaps you’ll need to travel to Canada for work, or perhaps you’ll want to fly to Jamaica for your brother’s “destination wedding.” Whatever your reason for traveling outside the States, if you have a felony conviction on your record, you may be wondering if it could bar you from traveling abroad.

“Aspiring travelers with criminal histories may have to do a little extra homework before booking flights to go abroad since certain criminal histories sometimes restrict travel plans. In most cases, people who have spent time in prison and completed parole are eligible to apply for passports and can still leave the United States – they just might have to jump through a few extra hoops,” according to USA Today.

Can Felons Travel Outside the U.S.?

Assuming you are a U.S. citizen, you should not have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport or traveling outside the U.S. with a felony conviction on your record. However, if you happen to owe $2,500 or more in back child support, your U.S. passport will be denied, but it won’t be denied for a felony conviction on your record.

On the other hand, if there is an active warrant for your arrest or if you are on probation, community supervision, or parole, leaving the U.S. may come with serious repercussions.

If you’re on probation or community supervision, a judge may have ordered you to stay within a certain area until you satisfactorily complete your term. If you were to leave the U.S., it could look like you were trying to flee the country to avoid your punishment and as you can imagine, this wouldn’t end well.

Now, let’s say you are cleared to leave the United States. You satisfactorily paid your fines and completed your probation or parole and now you’re free to leave the States. You may be able to leave the U.S., but that doesn’t mean all countries will accept you.

Canada, for example, is one country that is very strict about DWI and it may not let you in, even if you had one misdemeanor DWI on your record. So, it’s very important to research the country’s rules that you’re intending to travel to before you book a flight.

If you’re facing criminal charges and concerned they will bar you from traveling outside the United States, contact Alband, Lane & Balderama for assistance.

Can I Travel Abroad with a Felony?

When you’re facing criminal charges, you’ll probably hear your defense attorney, the prosecutor, and the judge say, “Don’t go too far” or something to that effect. In other words, they’re implying that you should probably stay in the area and avoid traveling out of state, let alone out of the country. If you’re placed on probation, community supervision, or parole for any reason during a criminal case, the court may even order you to stay in a certain area – this is common.

But what if your criminal case is complete? What if you have served your sentence and are no longer under the court’s close supervision? If you were convicted of a felony, can you travel abroad, to a foreign country? Or, does a felony conviction bar you from international travel?

Applying for a U.S. Passport

Suppose you’re a convicted felon who’s completed their sentence. You want to travel out of the country, so in that case, your first step is to apply for a U.S. passport. Will you be denied a U.S. passport? You should not have any issues obtaining a U.S. passport with a felony on your record because a passport simply proves your citizenship to the United States. However, you could be denied a U.S. passport under the following circumstances:

You owe $2,500 or more in back child support;

You’ve been convicted of drug trafficking;

You’ve been charged with a felony;

You’ve been charged with a federal crime;

A court order has forbidden you from traveling abroad;

As a condition of probation or parole, you’ve been barred from traveling outside the U.S.;

You’re currently under a supervised release program for a felony, or possession or distribution of a controlled substance on the state or federal level.

If you’re a convicted felon and none of the above exceptions apply, you should not have any problem obtaining a U.S. passport. As long as you’ve completed your sentence and no court has barred you from traveling abroad, you should be able to travel overseas. However, some countries do not let convicted felons in.

Canada, for example, frowns heavily on DUIs, even misdemeanor DUIs, and it will block foreigners from entering with DUIs on their record. If you plan to travel overseas with a felony on your record, make sure the country you plan to visit will let you in.

Countries a Convicted Felon can visit

Updated As of Nov 11, 2020 Ask the Pro

Some countries do not require a U.S. citizen to have a passport before entering. So, a convicted felon will not have a problem going to any of these countries. But, there are plenty of countries that do require a passport and a visa. A convicted felon with a passport is not guaranteed entry when a visa is required.

No Visa Country and Convicted Felon

There are plenty of countries that do not ask a U.S. citizen for a visa when visiting them. So, any persons with a valid U.S. passport can enter without issues, even a convicted felon. Some of these nations include the following:

Caribbean countries

Mexico

Columbia

Ecuador

Peru

Venezuela

European countries

South Africa

Thailand

Keep in mind a valid passport is a necessity and the six-month passport validity rule applies. For more information on travel restriction for a convicted felon here.

Countries Where Visas is Required and Criminal Records is Requested

Some countries that require a U.S. citizen to have a visa for entry may want you to get it before traveling or upon arrival. During the visa application, these countries will ask about your criminal history and may not issue a visa depending on the crime. Such countries are

Australia

China

Fiji

Japan

With a felony conviction, you may be denied entry. Other nations that require a pre-entry visa are Brazil and India. The good news about Brazil and India, their visa application does not ask about a criminal record. So, a convicted felon can travel to any of these nations without fear of denying entry.

Where to Apply for a Visa?

Most countries have an embassy in the U.S. For that reason; many require you to apply for one at the embassy in the state you reside in. Others prefer you use online. An electronic visa called ETA (Electronic Travel Authority) is required to travel to Australia or India. Some visas are valid for 90 days while others can be for up ten years. You may need a visa valid for one entry while others like China and Brazil visas are good for multiple uses in a ten-year span.

Some countries have complicated visa processes. The best advice is to seek visa services to prevent any delays; especially, if a visa is required in advance or even if you can get one at a port of entry. Getting one when you arrive can take time away from your trip. Also as a felon, you do not want to be denied entry after making your trip.

Overall

If you plan to visit any country that requires a visa for entry, apply at an embassy way in advice to prevent any disappointment. If a visa is only granted at the port of entry, it is best to ask at an embassy if you will be denied entry based on your conviction before boarding your flight. It is necessary to so that you can go to another country that may not need a visa to visit.

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Traveling Overseas With a Felony On Your Record

If you’re like a lot of U.S. citizens, at some point you’ll want or need to travel outside the United States. Perhaps you’ll want to go to Italy for your honeymoon or you’ll want to go to South America for a mission trip for your church.

Perhaps you’ll need to travel to Canada for work, or perhaps you’ll want to fly to Jamaica for your brother’s “destination wedding.” Whatever your reason for traveling outside the States, if you have a felony conviction on your record, you may be wondering if it could bar you from traveling abroad.

“Aspiring travelers with criminal histories may have to do a little extra homework before booking flights to go abroad since certain criminal histories sometimes restrict travel plans. In most cases, people who have spent time in prison and completed parole are eligible to apply for passports and can still leave the United States – they just might have to jump through a few extra hoops,” according to USA Today.

Can Felons Travel Outside the U.S.?

Assuming you are a U.S. citizen, you should not have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport or traveling outside the U.S. with a felony conviction on your record. However, if you happen to owe $2,500 or more in back child support, your U.S. passport will be denied, but it won’t be denied for a felony conviction on your record.

On the other hand, if there is an active warrant for your arrest or if you are on probation, community supervision, or parole, leaving the U.S. may come with serious repercussions.

If you’re on probation or community supervision, a judge may have ordered you to stay within a certain area until you satisfactorily complete your term. If you were to leave the U.S., it could look like you were trying to flee the country to avoid your punishment and as you can imagine, this wouldn’t end well.

Now, let’s say you are cleared to leave the United States. You satisfactorily paid your fines and completed your probation or parole and now you’re free to leave the States. You may be able to leave the U.S., but that doesn’t mean all countries will accept you.

Canada, for example, is one country that is very strict about DWI and it may not let you in, even if you had one misdemeanor DWI on your record. So, it’s very important to research the country’s rules that you’re intending to travel to before you book a flight.

If you’re facing criminal charges and concerned they will bar you from traveling outside the United States, contact Alband, Lane & Balderama for assistance.

Can I Travel Abroad with a Felony Record?

Can I Travel Abroad with a Felony Record?

If you’re a U.S. citizen who was convicted of a felony in the past, you may be wondering if you can travel abroad with a felony on your record. This is a very good question and one that should be answered before you book your big trip.

For starters, let’s discuss U.S. passports. Generally, if someone has a felony conviction on their record, they should not have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport. Why? Because passports are merely identifying documents that state what country you are a citizen of; they don’t contain criminal record information.

However, not everyone qualifies for a U.S. passport. There are some exceptions where someone cannot obtain a passport. For example, anyone who owes $2,500 or more in child support will be denied a U.S. passport. You may also be denied a U.S. passport for any of these reasons:

You were convicted of drug trafficking and you crossed an international border when committing the crime;

You’re currently subject to a federal arrest;

You’re subject to felony subpoena;

A court order, probation, or parole has forbidden you from leaving the country; or

You are on a supervised release program for a drug crime;

If you have satisfactorily completed your sentence and you were not convicted of drug trafficking, there is a very strong possibility that your U.S. passport application will be approved.

Will the Country Let You In?

While you may not have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport, the real issue may come down to the country you’re traveling to. You see, not all countries let criminals in. Canada, for example, won’t let people with DUI records in their country, even misdemeanor DUIs. So, while the United States may not bar you from leaving the country with a felony conviction, certain countries may stop you at the gates and send you straight back home.

If you want to travel abroad with a felony record, our advice is to contact your destination country and make sure they won’t bar you from entering. To learn more, we recommend reading “Travel Restrictions for Convicted Felons.”

Traveling Overseas with a Felony Record

If you’ve been convicted of a felony in Florida, you can probably recall having restrictions set upon you at one point. Perhaps a judge or a court-ordered you to stay in the county or the state and to avoid travel until all of your sentencing conditions were satisfied. Assuming you’ve completed your sentence, now you may be wondering if you can travel abroad without any negative consequences from the court – a reasonable question indeed!

For starters, if you’re a convicted felon, you shouldn’t have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport. Why? Because a passport is merely an identification document like a driver’s license. It says what country you’re a citizen of; it does not contain your criminal record information. Most convicted felons won’t have any issues obtaining a U.S. passport unless they:

Were convicted of drug trafficking and crossed an international border when they committed the crime;

Are currently subject to a felony-related subpoena or federal arrest;

Have been forbidden to leave the country by probation, parole, or active court order; or

Are currently under a supervised released program because of a felony-related drug charge.

Note: Anyone’s U.S. passport application can be denied if they are in arrears $2,500 or more in child support.

Do Your Research Before Booking Tickets

Even if you have no trouble obtaining a U.S. passport with a felony on your record, that doesn’t mean the country you wish to travel to will let you enter. Canada, for example, is one country that frowns heavily upon DUIs, even misdemeanor DUIs. If a traveler had a DUI on their record, more than likely Canada would not let them enter the country. So, it’s important to do your research with the U.S. Department of State before you book your plane tickets. Some countries refuse to issue travelers visas if they have felony convictions on their records.

Outstanding Warrants & Traveling Abroad

Are you a U.S. citizen with a felony record who wants to travel abroad? If so, you should not have any issues traveling outside the U.S. (providing the country lets you in), even though you have a criminal record. However, if you currently have an outstanding warrant for your arrest for a serious crime, such as a felony, you should not try to leave the U.S. If you do, it could appear as if you’re evading arrest and you can face serious ramifications.

If you need legal advice, contact my office at (561) 475-2752 today.

Countries That Dont Allow Felons 2022

It is notable that the destination country may have different regulations regarding what constitutes a felony. This can impact the granting or denial of a visa. For example, a traveler from Australia hoping to visit China may have committed a criminal act that is considered a regular offense in Australia, but if China defines that same act as a felony, the Chinese government may still deny that visitor a visa.

When preparing to visit (or immigrate to ) another country, one might have to go through the process of applying for a visa from the destination country. A visa is a document, usually stamped in a person’s passport, that gives that person official permission to enter a particular sovereign country. The process of applying for a visa varies from country to country. Some countries do not allow people who have a felony on their criminal records to obtain a visa, so they are unable to visit.

In Australia, tourists who wish to visit but who have a criminal record must first apply for a visa. Certain offenses can generally disqualify someone from obtaining permission, but whether or not a visa is an issue is up to the discretion of the official reviewing the paperwork. If the offense occurred a long time in the past and the person has been in good standing since then, a visa may still be granted. However, if your crime resulted in a prison sentence of a year or longer, you will likely not be allowed to immigrate to Australia.

Canada

Canada reserves the right to refuse entrance to any would-be visitors who have a criminal history. This includes those who have committed felonies, primarily if the offense resulted in a 10-year prison sentence. However, if the person was officially pardoned or considered to be rehabilitated (according to the Canadian law definition of the term), they may still be allowed to enter the country. Similarly, people who wish to immigrate permanently are subject to extra scrutiny if they’ve committed crimes such as theft, assault, manslaughter, dangerous driving, DIU, or certain drug-related offenses. The potential immigrant must wait until five years after their sentence is completed and demonstrate to Canadian authorities that they’ve been reformed.

Japan

Japan allows visits of up to 90 days without a visa. However, a visa is required for a longer stay, and visitors who have been imprisoned for more than a year (or have a drug-related conviction) are likely to be denied a visa. Similarly, Japan has a zero-tolerance policy against immigrants with drug-related convictions.

New Zealand

Those wishing to immigrate to New Zealand must not have committed a crime that resulted in imprisonment in their original country of 12 months or longer within the past ten years. Those sentenced to five or more years in prison are also not allowed, no matter how long ago the sentence was handed down.

One must fill out a visa application and list any criminal convictions on the form to visit Russia. If severe enough, those convictions can disqualify someone from obtaining a visa. A visa is not required to visit Japan for 90 days or fewer, but to get a long-term visa, one must pass a criminal background check. If Japanese officials find that a person has a new drug-related offense, mainly if it resulted in prison time, the visa may be declined.

United Kingdom

Visitors to the United Kingdom who have an American passport do not need to apply for a visa. However, for people with passports from a country for which the UK requires an advance visa, the government will conduct a background check. The permit may be declined if the officials reviewing the application believe that the person intends to commit harm while in the UK. Additionally, the immigration official at the border may refuse entrance.

United States

The United States may have the world’s largest foreign-born population and attract immigrants from all over the globe, but that doesn’t mean it lacks entry requirements. Those who have been convicted of offenses that would be defined as aggravated felonies in the United States—which is loosely defined as any offense that merited imprisonment for a year or longer in the person’s home country—are unlikely to be granted entrance or permanent residency.

Countries that will deny entry to felons if discovered

Some countries have laws prohibiting people who’ve been convicted of a felony, but don’t actively screen visitors’ criminal records. In these countries, a person convicted of a felony may be allowed in on good faith, but kicked out if and when their criminal record is discovered.

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