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Can You Transplant Tiger Eye Sumac | Planting A Tiger Eyes Sumac Tree In Our Garden! The 34 Latest Answer

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It is possible to dig up and transplant suckers. Early spring (while the shoot is still leafless) would be the best time to dig up a sucker. Replant immediately. Keep the plant well watered.Dear Reader: If the plants are small, they can be transplanted now by taking a ball of soil with the roots. For every inch of trunk diameter, you need 12 inches of soil. In the fall, once the leaves drop, the plants can be moved bare root, which is easier than balling. And you can do this until the ground freezes.Tiger Eyes has no significant pest problems. It does sucker a bit, but not nearly as much as the larger form of sumac. You also may need to prune it to maintain the desired shape. This can be done in late winter when you can see the shrub’s form clearly.

How to Prune Rhus Tiger Eyes
  1. Prune tiger eyes sumac in early spring. Clean garden clippers with a rag dipped in denatured alcohol before beginning. …
  2. Shape the shrub by light pruning. Trim back any overly long branches just above a bud or lateral shoot. …
  3. Top trim the sumac if it is growing too tall for its space.

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The day has finally come! Today I planted our first tree into our landscape in one of our garden beds! I’ve had my eye on this plant since I heard of it and saw it’s glorious display of fall color. With a good price I pulled the trigger! In today’s video I explain how I plant a Tiger Eye Sumac tree, some specs on the tree, and what supplies I used to do so, which include:
– Large auger attached to heavy duty drill – we use a DeWalt 60V
– Cottonburr Compost
– Biotone Starter Fertilizer
– Will likely come back in with leaf mulch from the yard at the end of fall for a little extra protection over winter
Overall the process wasn’t too laborious or demanding – I mean, it’s definitely hard work – but not impossible to do on your own by any means. I encourage you to try if you’re on the edge!
Please comment below and let me know your experience with Tiger Eyes Sumac! Please and subscribe to support my channel if you’ve found this at all helpful or informative – it greatly helps the channel grow. We’d love to have you!
Happy Planting!
-Steph

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DO YOU THINK I CAN SUCCESSFULLY TRANSPLANT …

Some plants are easier to transplant than others. For your Tiger Eye Sumac, you could do it in the fall or wait until spring. First, dig the new hole.

+ Click here for details

Source: garden-gab.com

Date Published: 1/5/2022

View: 507

Anyone transplanted a tiger eye sumac? – Houzz

However I’ve never tried uprooting a fullgrown sumac. Your best bet is to wait it out til Fall. For certain you cannot avo cutting out some of the roots- but …

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Source: www.houzz.com

Date Published: 6/23/2022

View: 4808

Keep your eye on this Tiger – IndyStar

Dear Reader: If the plants are small, they can be transplanted now by taking a ball of soil with the roots. For every inch of trunk diameter, …

+ Click here

Source: www.indystar.com

Date Published: 10/16/2022

View: 873

How to Transplant Sumac Bushes | eHow

Plant the sumac sucker in the prepared bed. Hold the plant inse the hole with the roots resting lightly on the surface of the soil beneath. Fill in around the …

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Source: www.ehow.com

Date Published: 8/28/2022

View: 6638

Plant Profile: Tiger Eyes Sumac

Yes, you could transplant it if it is not too large. Reply. LM on June 22, 2019 at …

+ Show more here

Source: northerngardener.org

Date Published: 4/22/2021

View: 2598

Some plants are easier to transplant than others … – Pinterest

Oct 23, 2020 – Some plants are easier to transplant than others. For your Tiger Eye Sumac, you could do it in the fall or wait until spring.

+ Click here for details

Source: www.pinterest.com

Date Published: 8/25/2021

View: 6077

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Planting a Tiger Eyes Sumac Tree In Our Garden!
Planting a Tiger Eyes Sumac Tree In Our Garden!

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  • Author: Tiny’s Garden
  • Views: 350 views
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  • Date Published: Nov 1, 2021
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLfWw0oyLHA

How do you transplant Tiger Eye?

Dear Reader: If the plants are small, they can be transplanted now by taking a ball of soil with the roots. For every inch of trunk diameter, you need 12 inches of soil. In the fall, once the leaves drop, the plants can be moved bare root, which is easier than balling. And you can do this until the ground freezes.

Should I prune my tiger eye sumac?

Tiger Eyes has no significant pest problems. It does sucker a bit, but not nearly as much as the larger form of sumac. You also may need to prune it to maintain the desired shape. This can be done in late winter when you can see the shrub’s form clearly.

How do you remove Tiger Eye sumac?

How to Prune Rhus Tiger Eyes
  1. Prune tiger eyes sumac in early spring. Clean garden clippers with a rag dipped in denatured alcohol before beginning. …
  2. Shape the shrub by light pruning. Trim back any overly long branches just above a bud or lateral shoot. …
  3. Top trim the sumac if it is growing too tall for its space.
See also  Annabelle: Creation | Full Movie Preview | Warner Bros. Entertainment | Annabelle Creation Full Movie 123Movies Trust The Answer

Can sumac be transplanted?

Yes, transplant them anyhow and dig up a few of the ones that weren’t potted and give them a try too. If the leaves fell off the plant and the stem is still rigid, it is probably still alive. If the plant drooped and shrivelled up with the leaves still on it, it is likely a goner.

Why is my tiger eye sumac dying?

It’s one of those plants that can be loved to death!

Tiger Eyes Sumac does fine being ignored. It needs just enough water to keep it alive and get the roots growing. Too much water, and the leaves fall off. Avoid fertilizing it, especially, in the fall.

How fast do tiger eyes grow?

It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 40 years or more. This shrub does best in full sun to partial shade. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water.

How big does a tiger eye sumac grow?

Lemon-lime foliage, fuzzy stems, and intense fall color make this sumac cultivar a standout. It grows into an upright, rounded form about 6 feet tall and as wide.

Is Tiger Eyes sumac Evergreen?

Sumac ‘Tiger Eyes’ … you’ll either love it or hate it. * What it is: A native, drought-tough, deer-resistant, bright-gold-leafed deciduous shrub with horizontal branches and opposite cut-edged leaves that give a lacy look to the plant. Fall color is vibrant orange/gold.

Can you cut back sumac?

The staghorn sumac (Rhus Typhina) should be pruned as little as possible. As this tree is famous for its outlandish growing habit, a slight correction of the crown may be desirable. This modest trimming can be done in June. If you want to prune more drastically, it is better to wait until late autumn or winter.

When should sumac bushes be trimmed?

Sumac, includes Staghorn and Smooth. In general, these plants need a minimal amount of pruning. Pruning, however, can improve the overall look of the plant. Only prune in early spring before the plant leafs out.

Do sumac trees have deep roots?

While the roots are relatively shallow and may only reach about 10 inches underground, many sumac species tend to spread rapidly. Sumac aggressively reproduces through seeds and grows in dense thickets, cutting off other plants’ access to vital nutrients.

What kind of soil do sumac like?

Sumac is a versatile plant that grows in almost any well-drained soil. Full sun or partial shade is fine for most varieties, but flameleaf or prairie sumac has better flowers and fall color if grown in full sun.

How fast do sumac trees grow?

Growth Rate

The African sumac (Rhus lancea) is a quickly growing tree, winter hardy to U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8 through 10, which can add 24 inches per season to its height.

Ask the ISU Extension Gardening Experts

My neighbor’s ‘Tiger Eyes’ sumac has produced several suckers. Can I dig up one of the suckers and plant it in my yard?

Suckering (the production of shoots from the plant’s roots) is a very distinctive characteristic of sumac (Rhus species). Sometimes the suckers are annoying as they pop up in areas where they’re not wanted.

It is possible to dig up and transplant suckers. Early spring (while the shoot is still leafless) would be the best time to dig up a sucker. Replant immediately. Keep the plant well watered. There’s a good chance that the transplanted sucker will survive.

What is the common name of the tree that produces yellow-green hedge balls?

Hedge balls or hedge apples are produced by the Osage orange (Maclura pomifera). Other common plant names include hedge apple, bodark, bois d’arc and bowwood.

The Osage orange is a small- to medium-sized tree. It commonly grows 30 to 40 feet tall, occasionally as tall as 50 to 60 feet. It typically has a short trunk and a rounded or irregular crown. The leaves of the Osage orange are a shiny medium to dark green. They turn yellow in the fall. The twigs are buff to orange-brown and are armed with ½ -inch long spines. The stems exude a milky sap when cut. The Osage orange is dioecious. Male and female flowers are produced on separate trees. The small, green flowers appear in May or June. The female trees produce 3- to 5- inch-diameter fruit. The fruit somewhat resemble a yellow-green orange. Mature fruit fall to the ground in September or October.

The wood of the Osage orange is golden yellow or bright orange when first cut, but turns brown on exposure. The wood is extremely hard, heavy, tough, and durable. It also shrinks or swells very little compared to the wood of other trees. The wood is used for fence posts, insulator pins, treenails, furniture and archery bows. In fact, many archers consider the wood of the Osage orange to be the world’s finest wood for bows. (The name bodark is from the French bois d’arc meaning “bow wood.”)

The common name of Osage orange is derived from the Osage Indians (who used the wood to make bows and other tools) and the fruit’s resemblance to a yellow-green orange.

My ‘Sunburst’ locust is not growing well. What could be the problem?

The ‘Sunburst’ honeylocust has distinctive yellow-green foliage. Unfortunately, it is not a vigorous grower. It grows slowly and is susceptible to cankers and mimosa webworms.

Cankers, caused by fungal pathogens, are localized dead areas on branches, twigs and the trunks of trees. The most common canker on honeylocust is Thyronectria canker. It typically attacks trees weakened by adverse environmental conditions or poor care. Thyronectria cankers are usually elongated and slightly sunken when young, with callus ridges at the edges. Initially, the surface of the destroyed bark is frequently orange-brown. It later bleaches to bright yellow-orange. Fungal cankers cannot be controlled with fungicides. The best way to prevent cankers from attacking trees is to keep the trees in good health with proper care.

Mimosa webworms are grayish brown caterpillars. Damage occurs when the caterpillars tie the honeylocust leaflets together and feed on the foliage inside the protective webs. Damaged areas eventually turn brown. There are two generations per year. If necessary, mimosa webworms can be controlled with insecticides. Insecticides must be applied shortly after egg hatch (typically mid-June and early August in Iowa) and before webbing is apparent.

For more gardening information visit us at Yard and Garden Online.

Contacts :

Richard Jauron, Horticulture, (515) 294-1871, [email protected]

Keep your eye on this Tiger

Dick Crum

Dear Dr. Dirt: I usually research plants before I buy, but recently while at Lowe’s, a chartreuse mini-tree with jagged leaves caught my eye. The tag said “Rhus First Editions Tiger Eyes Sumac.”

Long ago, my dad said, “Damn sumac,” and I have avoided it ever since. However, this one seemed to be a hybrid, so I bought one. I took it home, and the description sounds amazing. Then I read another site: “Highly invasive. Avoid at all costs.” But a second site said “invasive but not aggressive.” And so it went, back and forth — one site yes, one site no; aggressive to the point of annoyance and beyond, to a welcome addition to any yard.

I don’t know which one to believe, but I keep hearing my dad’s curse in my ears and have some doubts about having planted the pretty little thing. Should I allow this plant to root or just pitch it now? — Peter, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: Some of our best fall color comes from the common sumac growing along roadsides. It will grow just anywhere if the area has good soil drainage. Tiger Eyes, Rhus typhina ‘Bailtiger’, was discovered in a Minnesota nursery, and it was a real find. I first observed the plant in the Meijer Horticultural Park in Grand Rapids, Mich., two years ago. Visiting this beautiful sculpture and horticultural garden is well worth the trip! A Japanese Garden is being added, so one could easily spend a day there.

This beautiful, fine-textured, deciduous shrub with golden yellow leaves that turn orange red in the fall has a height and spread of 4 to 6 feet. In time, the plants will sucker and spread to about 6 feet. Select planting sites that have full sun to light shade and medium to well-drained soil. The plants are low-maintenance and are basically pest-free. You and your dad will certainly enjoy this relatively new addition to the sumac family.

Dear Dr. Dirt: Five years ago, I planted a Japanese Maple. It has done quite well. I was gone for the winter and when I got back, the large limb on the left side had been torn loose from the tree and was lying on the ground. Is it possible to use some landscaping tape and try to reattach it? — Janet, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: The 50-some inches of snow this past winter did a lot of damage to shrubs and trees. If the limb is completely detached from the tree, it would be impossible to reattach it. Do some pruning to shape the tree to make up for the loss of the limb.

Dear Dr. Dirt: I have two lilac bushes that I want to transplant. When is the best time of year to do that? — Mary Ann, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: If the plants are small, they can be transplanted now by taking a ball of soil with the roots. For every inch of trunk diameter, you need 12 inches of soil. In the fall, once the leaves drop, the plants can be moved bare root, which is easier than balling. And you can do this until the ground freezes.

Dear Dr. Dirt: We had six large ash trees removed and the stumps ground out. I want to place a raised garden bed on top of the ground-out stumps. Will this cause a problem with the plants in the bed? Should I use garden soil? — Andy, Greenwood

Dear Reader: Raised beds are great for gardening. Make them 4 to 6 feet wide, remembering that you can reach in from either side of the bed. There should be no problem placing the beds over the ground-out stumps. The chips from the stumps will cause a nitrogen shortage in the soil. Thus, you will have to use twice the amount of fertilizer (6 pounds of 12-12-12 rather than 3 pounds per 100 square feet of area) the first two years after starting the beds.

There is no need to add soil to the beds. Instead, add 3 or 4 inches of compost, peat moss or rotted manure, and work it into the soil. Every year, add this amount of organic matter, and the beds will soon fill up.

Dear Dr. Dirt: Who sells rubber mulch, and is it heavy enough so a blower can be used to clean debris from it? We like the dark-colored mulch, but it gets messy-looking with tree beans and other debris. — Ray, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: The larger garden centers, lawn-care companies and nurseries should be a source of rubber mulch. Some of the blowers are pretty powerful, so blow often before the debris becomes imbedded in the mulch. My neighbor has had no problems clearing his rubber mulch with a blower.

Send your garden questions to [email protected]

Plant Profile: Tiger Eyes Sumac

Staghorn sumac is a large treelike shrub native to the eastern edge of Minnesota, Wisconsin and much of southeastern Canada. Tall with an umbrella habit as it matures, stagorn or cutleaf sumac is a great choice for larger, wilder landscapes. Birds love it and the fruits can be used for everything from dyes to lemonade. But it has a few characteristics home gardeners resent: It is large (16-feet-tall by 20 feet wide), it sends up sprouts everywhere and (as I well know) a mature staghorn sumac can be easily uprooted in high winds.

With these disadvantages in mind, breeders created Tiger Eyes™ sumac (Rhus typhina ‘Bailtiger’), a chartruese-leaved, shorter variety that adds a striking presence to foundation beds and other garden spaces. The bright color of Tiger Eyes makes it a perfect focal point or use a row or clump of them to draw the eye toward a section of the garden. Its horizontal form makes it a good addition to Asian-influenced garden areas. In addition to the chartreuse to gold color it has in summer, Tiger Eyes has a bright reddish orange color in fall.

Tiger Eyes grow to about 6 feet tall and about that wide in an ideal situation. The plants like sun to part-sun and tolerate dry soil well. Some sources list it as hardy to USDA Zone 4, but other Minnesota-based sources, say it is hardy to zone 3, so this may be a good bet for northern Minnesota gardeners, too.

It’s important to maintain a regular watering schedule when the plants are getting established during the first year after planting. Like the species staghorn sumac, Tiger Eyes has a shallow root system and benefits from some mulch, especially at first. It does not do well in very clay soil, so if that is what you have, you may want to amend the soil carefully or choose another shrub.

Tiger Eyes has no significant pest problems. It does sucker a bit, but not nearly as much as the larger form of sumac. You also may need to prune it to maintain the desired shape. This can be done in late winter when you can see the shrub’s form clearly.

Tiger Eyes is a medium-sized shrub with striking color and interesting form. It would be a great addition to many garden styles and spaces.

How to Prune Rhus Tiger Eyes

Enjoy the sweep and structure of sumac without all that messy excess growth. Rhus tiger eyes (Rhus typhina “Tigereye Bailtiger”), commonly called tiger eyes sumac, stops growing somewhere around 6 feet in height and width, rather than charging up to 30 feet like native sumac. Tiger eyes sumac bursts on the scene in spring with leafy chartreuse foliage that turns to intense scarlets and oranges in autumn. Yellow flowers are followed by dark red fruit. The cultivar thrives in U.S.Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through 8. Its compact, upright rounded form needs little pruning.

DO YOU THINK I CAN SUCCESSFULLY TRANSPLANT TIGER EYE SUMAC?

Some plants are easier to transplant than others.

For your Tiger Eye Sumac, you could do it in the fall or wait until spring. First, dig the new hole. Then, get an empty bucket ready for the sumac you are about to dig up. Water the base of the sumac to help hold the dirt together. When digging, go out a little ways and as deep as necessary to get as many roots as possible with the root ball. Place the shrub with the root ball into the bucket. Or, if it isn’t too large, just keep the sumac in the shovel and move it to the new home. Pack in dirt around the roots. Water and mulch and it should be good to go.

Thanks for writing!

Anyone transplanted a tiger eye sumac?

I planted one of these 3 yrs ago and it has now outgrown the space I put it in, plus it is suckering quite a lot. We need to dig it out but are wondering how deep the root system would be, as the gas line is somewhere close by. Has anyone dug one up? Also does anyone know exactly how deep the gas lines are? I heard 4 feet but wasn’t sure.

Any help would be appreciated.

Keep your eye on this Tiger

Dick Crum

Dear Dr. Dirt: I usually research plants before I buy, but recently while at Lowe’s, a chartreuse mini-tree with jagged leaves caught my eye. The tag said “Rhus First Editions Tiger Eyes Sumac.”

Long ago, my dad said, “Damn sumac,” and I have avoided it ever since. However, this one seemed to be a hybrid, so I bought one. I took it home, and the description sounds amazing. Then I read another site: “Highly invasive. Avoid at all costs.” But a second site said “invasive but not aggressive.” And so it went, back and forth — one site yes, one site no; aggressive to the point of annoyance and beyond, to a welcome addition to any yard.

I don’t know which one to believe, but I keep hearing my dad’s curse in my ears and have some doubts about having planted the pretty little thing. Should I allow this plant to root or just pitch it now? — Peter, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: Some of our best fall color comes from the common sumac growing along roadsides. It will grow just anywhere if the area has good soil drainage. Tiger Eyes, Rhus typhina ‘Bailtiger’, was discovered in a Minnesota nursery, and it was a real find. I first observed the plant in the Meijer Horticultural Park in Grand Rapids, Mich., two years ago. Visiting this beautiful sculpture and horticultural garden is well worth the trip! A Japanese Garden is being added, so one could easily spend a day there.

This beautiful, fine-textured, deciduous shrub with golden yellow leaves that turn orange red in the fall has a height and spread of 4 to 6 feet. In time, the plants will sucker and spread to about 6 feet. Select planting sites that have full sun to light shade and medium to well-drained soil. The plants are low-maintenance and are basically pest-free. You and your dad will certainly enjoy this relatively new addition to the sumac family.

Dear Dr. Dirt: Five years ago, I planted a Japanese Maple. It has done quite well. I was gone for the winter and when I got back, the large limb on the left side had been torn loose from the tree and was lying on the ground. Is it possible to use some landscaping tape and try to reattach it? — Janet, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: The 50-some inches of snow this past winter did a lot of damage to shrubs and trees. If the limb is completely detached from the tree, it would be impossible to reattach it. Do some pruning to shape the tree to make up for the loss of the limb.

Dear Dr. Dirt: I have two lilac bushes that I want to transplant. When is the best time of year to do that? — Mary Ann, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: If the plants are small, they can be transplanted now by taking a ball of soil with the roots. For every inch of trunk diameter, you need 12 inches of soil. In the fall, once the leaves drop, the plants can be moved bare root, which is easier than balling. And you can do this until the ground freezes.

Dear Dr. Dirt: We had six large ash trees removed and the stumps ground out. I want to place a raised garden bed on top of the ground-out stumps. Will this cause a problem with the plants in the bed? Should I use garden soil? — Andy, Greenwood

Dear Reader: Raised beds are great for gardening. Make them 4 to 6 feet wide, remembering that you can reach in from either side of the bed. There should be no problem placing the beds over the ground-out stumps. The chips from the stumps will cause a nitrogen shortage in the soil. Thus, you will have to use twice the amount of fertilizer (6 pounds of 12-12-12 rather than 3 pounds per 100 square feet of area) the first two years after starting the beds.

There is no need to add soil to the beds. Instead, add 3 or 4 inches of compost, peat moss or rotted manure, and work it into the soil. Every year, add this amount of organic matter, and the beds will soon fill up.

Dear Dr. Dirt: Who sells rubber mulch, and is it heavy enough so a blower can be used to clean debris from it? We like the dark-colored mulch, but it gets messy-looking with tree beans and other debris. — Ray, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: The larger garden centers, lawn-care companies and nurseries should be a source of rubber mulch. Some of the blowers are pretty powerful, so blow often before the debris becomes imbedded in the mulch. My neighbor has had no problems clearing his rubber mulch with a blower.

Send your garden questions to [email protected]

How to Transplant Sumac Bushes

Nearly 250 species of sumac exist in temperate and subtropical woodland environments around the world, including several species that are cultivated as ornamental shrubs for their reddish berries and attractive foliage. It is sometimes difficult to determine the species or cultivar of sumac shrubs since there is a strong superficial resemblance throughout the genus Rhus, and so many gardeners turn to vegetative propagation methods such as sucker transplantation since most cultivars cannot be grown true from seed. Transplanting sumac suckers is a very simple task, and within one to two growing seasons, the shrubs will establish and begin to bloom.

Plant Profile: Tiger Eyes Sumac

Staghorn sumac is a large treelike shrub native to the eastern edge of Minnesota, Wisconsin and much of southeastern Canada. Tall with an umbrella habit as it matures, stagorn or cutleaf sumac is a great choice for larger, wilder landscapes. Birds love it and the fruits can be used for everything from dyes to lemonade. But it has a few characteristics home gardeners resent: It is large (16-feet-tall by 20 feet wide), it sends up sprouts everywhere and (as I well know) a mature staghorn sumac can be easily uprooted in high winds.

With these disadvantages in mind, breeders created Tiger Eyes™ sumac (Rhus typhina ‘Bailtiger’), a chartruese-leaved, shorter variety that adds a striking presence to foundation beds and other garden spaces. The bright color of Tiger Eyes makes it a perfect focal point or use a row or clump of them to draw the eye toward a section of the garden. Its horizontal form makes it a good addition to Asian-influenced garden areas. In addition to the chartreuse to gold color it has in summer, Tiger Eyes has a bright reddish orange color in fall.

Tiger Eyes grow to about 6 feet tall and about that wide in an ideal situation. The plants like sun to part-sun and tolerate dry soil well. Some sources list it as hardy to USDA Zone 4, but other Minnesota-based sources, say it is hardy to zone 3, so this may be a good bet for northern Minnesota gardeners, too.

It’s important to maintain a regular watering schedule when the plants are getting established during the first year after planting. Like the species staghorn sumac, Tiger Eyes has a shallow root system and benefits from some mulch, especially at first. It does not do well in very clay soil, so if that is what you have, you may want to amend the soil carefully or choose another shrub.

Tiger Eyes has no significant pest problems. It does sucker a bit, but not nearly as much as the larger form of sumac. You also may need to prune it to maintain the desired shape. This can be done in late winter when you can see the shrub’s form clearly.

Tiger Eyes is a medium-sized shrub with striking color and interesting form. It would be a great addition to many garden styles and spaces.

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