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Why I Dont Dock Tails On My Australian Shepherds | Australian Shepherd Breeders That Don’T Dock Tails 192 Most Correct Answers

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Why I DONT dock tails on my Australian Shepherds – australian shepherd breeders that don’t dock tails, details of this topic

I breed AKC/ASCA Standard Size Australian Shepherds. I stopped docking tails all together in 2014 and have been shamed by other American breeders since making the decision, due to the fact that breed standards call for docked tails. My goal is to spread the word on tail docking and why this is not necessary procedure today! I am not here to bash anyone who prefers to dock, I just want dog owners to know that they should have a choice!

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US Aussie breeders that don’t dock tails, do they exist? – Reddit

Hi there, I am wondering if anyone knows of any good quality breeders who don’t dock tails? I’m situated in Houston Texas area but can …

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Date Published: 8/27/2021

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Aussies With Tails –

Today in the U.S., tail docking of Australian Shepherds remains the accepted custom among breeders, and efforts to ban the practice have been adamantly opposed …

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Source: www.buckhillaussies.com

Date Published: 5/9/2022

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Coast Ranch Company Dog Program

We sell the whole dog, tail and all. When I first started breeding Aussies I docked tails and removed dew claws just like everybody else.

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Source: coastranchcompany.com

Date Published: 12/30/2021

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Aussies WITH tails! -Breeders- Australian Shepherd & Mini …

Based in the USA, but worldwe welcome! This group is for breeders who do not dock tails on their Aussies, and for people in search of them to connect…

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Date Published: 4/2/2021

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Is it okay to ask an Australian Shepherd breeder to not dock a …

The standard began entirely for safety purposes as Australian Shepherds were created as working dogs; and because of that a docked tail just became show …

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Why I DONT dock tails on my Australian Shepherds
Why I DONT dock tails on my Australian Shepherds

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  • Author: Brooke Jordan
  • Views: 4,280 views
  • Likes: 174 likes
  • Date Published: Apr 11, 2021
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCX_CMl5UNo

Do Australian Shepherds need to have their tails docked?

Australian shepherds get their tails cut off (docked) primarily because of breed or conformation standards. Sometimes, it’s done just for cosmetic reasons, as breeders often want their pups to have a certain look. In other cases, it’s to prevent a working dog (especially herders) from an injury.

Do all Australian Shepherds have bobbed tails?

The Natural Bobbed Tail

Australian Shepherd dogs are one of only a few breeds that can boast the rare feature of a naturally bobbed tail. While not every Australian Shepherd dog is naturally tailless, about one in five Aussies are born without a tail.

Do Australian Shepherds have naturally docked tails?

Many have naturally short tails.

In addition to having a genetic predisposition for heterochromia, Aussies have a one-in-five chance of being born with a naturally bobbed tail,. Ranchers purposely bred Aussies that had these naturally short tails because they are safer when it comes to herding.

Is Tail Docking Cruel?

The American Veterinary Medical Association states that “ear-cropping and tail-docking are not medically indicated nor of benefit to the patient. These procedures cause pain and distress and, as with all surgical procedures, are accompanied by inherent risks of anesthesia, blood loss, and infection.

Does tail docking hurt puppies?

Tail docking is painful even in puppies. Cutting through skin, muscle, nerves, and between bones is never a non-painful procedure, even if a puppy is only 2 days old. It will still feel the procedure but many breeders do it without anesthetics or sedation since the puppies are easily restrained.

Why do breeders dock tails?

Though docking and cropping are done mostly for appearance’s sake, many owners and breeders say removing hunting and farm dogs’ tails might prevent injuries during chases or herding. Others say docking keeps energetic breeds like boxers from hurting their tails by thumping them against walls or dog crates.

Are mini Australian Shepherds born with tails?

Most Australian Shepherds and Mini Aussies are born with full long tails while some are born with short bobbed tails (NBT), and others are born with natural partial bobs, where the tail is mid length and appears stubby. Breeders have historically docked the tails when the puppies are born.

What is a black tri Australian Shepherd?

Black Tricolor Australian Shepherd

A three-colored black Australian Shepherd, or “black tri Australian Shepherd,” has both white and tan highlights. The white markings are most common on its muzzle, chest, stomach, and paws, while the tan marks are most prominent on its eyes, cheeks, and legs.

What two dogs make a Australian Shepherd?

There are many theories on which breeds were used to create the Australian Shepherd. It’s likely that the Aussie’s ancestors include collie and shepherd-type dogs that were imported with shipments of sheep from Australia during the 1840s — hence the name.

Do mini Aussiedoodles have tails?

Most poodles and Australian shepherds have their tails docked(cut off) and dew claws removed. These procedures are usually performed at 3 days old.

US Aussie breeders that don’t dock tails, do they exist? : AustralianShepherd

Hi there, I am wondering if anyone knows of any good quality breeders who don’t dock tails? I’m situated in Houston Texas area but can travel as far as needed. I’m originally from the UK where docking is illegal and already have one aussie with a tail, its honestly my favourite part of him. I would love to get him a brother or sister but I know almost every breeder in the US will dock as it’s the breed standard here. I obviously don’t want to support the nearest puppy mill so a quality breeder is important to me, yet those will strive to stick to breed standard. Are there any breeders you know of that would fit the description or is keeping the tail on an aussie that unheard of in the US? Thanks in advance to anyone who has any recommendations!

P. S. I really don’t want this to turn into a discussion of docking vs not docking. If you strongly believe in removing a dogs tail I don’t need to hear your reasons why or be told to find another breed because this is how we do it in the US.

Aussies With Tails –

So why do most Aussie breeders dock (cut off) the tails of their newborn pups? The answer, in a word, is CUSTOM. They dock the tails because breeders before them did, and it is customary to do so. It is the TRADITION.

Australian Shepherds evolved years ago in the American West, and inhabited rather harsh territory. They were rugged work animals, mainly used for the job their breed name suggests: they were excellent shepherds, rounding up and protecting sheep and other livestock.

The fields the Aussies worked in were covered with brush, weeds, vines and other scrub. As a result, their tails attracted and became snarled with burrs, stickers and other plant material. It was not only hard to remove this debris, it could possibly cause trauma and infection to the tail. As a result, Aussie owners began docking the tails of their young puppies.

Today in the U.S., tail docking of Australian Shepherds remains the accepted custom among breeders, and efforts to ban the practice have been adamantly opposed by Aussie breeding clubs.

Why Do Australian Shepherds Get Their Tails Cut Off? – Active Dog Breeds

Cutting off a dog’s tail is known as “docking,” while some dogs naturally have a bobbed tail. Most Australian shepherds are born with a tail, with only about one in five having a naturally bobbed tail. So, why do so many Aussies have their tails cut off?

Australian shepherds get their tails cut off (docked) primarily because of breed or conformation standards. Sometimes, it’s done just for cosmetic reasons, as breeders often want their pups to have a certain look. In other cases, it’s to prevent a working dog (especially herders) from an injury.

Throughout this article, I’ll discuss these reasons in more detail and explain how this trait came to be associated with Australian shepherds.

Why Some Australian Shepherds Don’t Have Tails

If you’ve spent any time looking at pictures of Australian shepherds, you may have noticed that some of these dogs have a full, bushy tail, and others don’t have much of a tail at all.

Below are several reasons why Aussies have their tails cut off:

Breeders Follow Appearance Standards of the Breed

Despite the rarity of a naturally occurring bobtail, many people prefer Australian shepherds with this bobbed tail look. Much of the appeal is driven by breed standards published by organizations like the American Kennel Club (AKC) or the Australian Shepherd Club of America (ASCA).

The AKC’s official standard for an Australian shepherd is that the tail is straight and doesn’t exceed 4 inches (10.16 cm) long (either naturally or docked). Similarly, the ASCA calls the Aussie’s natural or docked bobtail an “identifying characteristic.”

Because of these appearance standards, many breeders dock the tail shortly after birth to make the puppies more desirable and more fitting to the well-known characteristics of the breed.

Docking Fixes Cosmetic Problems, Like a Curvy Tail

Even if a breeder doesn’t automatically dock every Aussie’s tail or an owner doesn’t intend to use their pup for a show dog, there are still circumstances where docking the tail may be used to correct a cosmetic defect.

Some Australian Shepherds are born with a blunt tail that looks too short and doesn’t taper like most dogs’ tails. In this case, the tail is usually docked to look more “normal” and is more aesthetic.

Another cosmetic reason for tail docking is if the tail is curved or has what looks like a kink in it. Because this tail shape doesn’t look like the typical tapered, feathery type that many Aussies have, many breeders and owners choose to dock the tail. This shape is usually viewed as a malformation that should be corrected through docking.

In other cases, the tail is perfectly normal and looks like any other Australian shepherd, but the owner simply prefers the look of a docked tail. In these cases, the tail may be cut for aesthetic preference.

A Shorter Tail Can Prevent Injuries in Aussies

While cosmetic reasons and breed conformity are the most common reasons to cut an Australian shepherd’s tail, some owners dock the tail to prevent injuries to the dog. Some owners believe that the tail can become a risk for injury for working dogs.

Some examples of potential work-related hazards for tails include:

A guard dog or police dog could be grabbed by the tail during a pursuit, causing injury.

Hunting or herding dogs could injure the tail tip in the underbrush.

The tail could be stepped on, causing injury while working with larger animals.

The tail could collect sand spurs or other sharp items in certain environments.

However, some research has shown that the actual risk for tail injury is very low or that the risk for injury is only reasonable for specific dogs carrying out particular tasks.

Docking Makes Grooming the Tail Easier

Some breeders and owners dock their Aussie’s (or other dogs’) tails due to improved sanitation or cleanliness. Long-haired dogs (like Australian shepherds) can be challenging to groom, especially around the tail area.

The fur around the tail can become matted if it’s not cleaned and brushed. In addition, long hair can pick up dirt, debris, plant material, or waste. Without cleaning, the area around the tail can become irritated. The FURminator works great to remove the undercoat and the HERTZKO Slicker Brush can help crush out mats if this becomes a problem.

Some anti-docking advocates argue that docking the tail for sanitary purposes is unnecessary and doesn’t improve the animal’s health or wellbeing. Tail docking is a highly debated topic, with many people who think there is no reason to put the animal through such a painful procedure.

Others argue that the procedure is performed when the puppy is just days old when the nervous system isn’t fully developed, meaning the puppy won’t experience the same pain level as an older dog.

Is It Okay To Breed Bobtail Australian Shepherds?

Since some Aussies are born with a natural bobtail, some people may believe that they can or should be bred with this feature rather than docking the tail. An incomplete dominant gene causes this natural bobtail.

Puppies that inherit one copy of this gene are born with a naturally bobbed tail.

It is not okay to breed bobtail Australian Shepherds using two genes from dogs naturally born with bobbed tails, as puppies born through these genes may likely die. Such genes can also increase the risk of spina bifida or other defects related to the spinal cord in Australian Shepherds.

Spinal and other defects sometimes occur even if the breeding pair are not naturally bobtailed. The Australian Shepherd Health and Genetics Institute (ASHGI) performed a survey on Australian shepherd breeding dogs and found that 2% produced natural bobtail puppies with severe, fatal congenital disabilities.

Breeding Aussies with natural bobtails is extremely risky, as puppies can have severe defects that may require euthanasia, which is devastating to any breeder or owner.

Today, the need for docking the tail has remained prevalent within the breed.

Final Thoughts

Australian shepherds often have a very short tail, a look that’s become a well-known trait for the breed. Most Aussies are born with a tail, so a veterinarian usually removes the tail shortly after birth to achieve that look.

Australian shepherds have their tails cut off to meet the breed characteristics and appearance standards set by various kennel club organizations. Some remove it to prevent injury or keep the fur clean, but most people do so for cosmetic reasons.

Sources

Are Australian Shepherds Born Without Tails?

If you are the proud owner of an Australian Shepherd puppy then you know there is not much cuter than the hilarious attempted bobbed tail wag of an Aussie. The word “attempted” is a key part of the previous phrase as it tells you everything you need to know about the famous Aussie wag. For most Aussie dogs, a tail wag is more of a full-blown booty shake wherein they vigorously shake their entire hindquarters. This classic Australian Shepherd dog temperament is just one of the many fun facts about Australian Shepherds, but it begs the question, where’s the tail?

The Australian Shepherd is one of several dog breeds that is known for being tailless. While other dogs like Boxers and French Bulldogs are also known for being tailless, the back end of an Australian Shepherd dog is somewhat iconic in the canine community. The tailless look of the breed makes them look like adorable little bears, and again when they get excited, it’s a real spectacle. But are Australian Shepherds naturally tailless? Below you will find everything you’ve ever wanted to know about the bobbed tail of this unique breed.

The Natural Bobbed Tail

Australian Shepherd dogs are one of only a few breeds that can boast the rare feature of a naturally bobbed tail. While not every Australian Shepherd dog is naturally tailless, about one in five Aussies are born without a tail. The natural occurring bobbed tail is hard to distinguish from a manufactured bob but read on to learn a little bit about the differences between the natural bobbed tail and those created by the practice of tail docking.

What Creates the natural bobbed tail?

The natural bobbed tail is a recessive gene within the Australian Shepherd dog breed genetic code. This genetic mutation curbs the tail, naturally creating a shortened tail that is only about one or two vertebrae in length.

The recessive gene responsible for the naturally occurring bobbed tail of an Australian Shepherd dog is the T gene mutation, also known as the C189G gene. This genetic trait exists within every Australian Shepherd pup, and those puppies who are born with a bobbed tail have one copy of this gene. While not every Aussie pup exhibits the C189G gene mutation, every Aussie possesses the ability to pass on the recessive gene.

When genetic code is being written for a new puppy, there are three possibilities for whether or not the bobbed tail will naturally occur. The options are as follows:

Two copies of a normal tail gene will produce a genetically normal tail in the pup One copy of a normal gene and one copy of a C189G gene will produce a bobbed tail. Two copies of the C189G gene will likely result in a puppy that dies in the womb.

Although there are only three genetic outcomes for an Australian Shepherd puppy’s tail formation, it is interesting to note that only 20% of Aussies have a naturally occurring bobbed tail. Similarly, only about one in five dogs in the Aussie breed will be born with a merle coat. The merle coat is a similarly recessive gene, although the merle gene mutation does not carry the same dire effects.

What are other kinds of Aussie tails?

For those Australian Shepherd dogs born with a “normal” tail, the tail is commonly docked. We will get into tail docking in a little bit, but for now, it is important to know that the normal tail of an Australian Shepherd puppy is far from normal. The tail of an Australian Shepherd dog that is permitted to grow out past birth is often crooked and weak.

There are several variations of the Australian Shepherd dog tail, some of which are curved and some of which are straight, but if permitted to grow to its full length, every Aussie pup tail is completely covered in the same thick, matted fur that covers the rest of the dog.

Breeding for Bobbed Tailed Aussies

Breeding for the bobbed tail is a practice that is frowned upon due to the complicated nature of the potential outcomes. In most cases where a breeder is attempting to produce a litter of naturally bobbed tailed puppies, there will inevitably be more puppies that die during or shortly after birth than those that survive. The recessive gene that gives the breed a naturally occurring bobbed tail is not completely understood, and as such, breeding for a bobbed tail is widely regarded as unacceptable. This practice presents high risks of health problems. Read more on Common Australian Shepherd Health Problems: Everything You Need to Know.

Tail Docking: The heated debate

The medical benefits

For the Aussie breed, tail docking actually serves a positive medical purpose. While the surface level optics of tail docking appear to be cruel, there are several medical benefits for this standard procedure.

In Australian Shepherd dogs that have a full tail, there are several issues that can become rather complicated nuisances. The first involves the dog’s safety as the thick fur of the tail often gets caught in bushes and high brush, which could potentially leave the dog stuck or lead to a dislocated tail. Additionally, sanitation becomes a serious issue as fecal matter gets stuck in the matted fur of the tail, creating a terrible mess for the dog and their owner.

When the tail of an Australian Shepherd goes undocked, we face a potential medical threat to the life of the dog. The genetic makeup of the Aussie breed is such that the last third of the tail is brittle and delicate, making it prone to breaking or splitting, which would cause a lot more pain and trauma for the dog than the process of tail docking.

Additionally, when done correctly, tail docking is a painless procedure that leaves the puppy without any memory of the experience. There are those who have called for tail docking to be done only if a puppy is given anesthesia. Unfortunately, puppies are far too young for anesthesia without risking severe medical complications, and waiting until they were old enough to be given general anesthesia would result in a traumatic experience with a lot of pain that they would undoubtedly remember.

The Implementation

WARNING! If you have a squeamish instinct or do not want to read about how the actual method of tail docking is performed, then skip this section!

Tail docking is performed several days after the birth of a puppy before the nervous system is fully developed. Tail docking is a quick procedure that has two methods. The first method requires the tail to be cut with a pair of scissors just above the base of the tail in between the first and second vertebrae of the tail. The freshly cut area is quickly cauterized to seal the skin, and the entire procedure is over in less than 5 minutes.

The second method is thought to be less graphic with less pain, but it takes more time. Application of the second method requires that circulation be cut off between the first and second vertebrae resulting in blood loss and the ultimate rejection of the tail by the body’s own natural processes.

In both methods, the puppy is not old enough to register or feel pain, as their nervous system is still underdeveloped. The American Kennel Club recognizes tail docking as a safe and suitable method for creating a tail length that is both medically and aesthetically suitable for the dog.

In the case of the Australian Shepherd pup, tail docking is a procedure that benefits the life of the dog. A shorter tail prevents potential breaking later in life and ensures a cleaner and more sanitary lifestyle for the dog and its owner.

While not all Australian Shepherd dogs are born naturally bobbed tailed, the majority of Aussies sport the classic bobbed tail look. Whether you are anti-docking or indifferent, it is hard to ignore the medical benefits and reduction in memorable pain that come as a result of the procedure.

The classic tailless look of the Australian Shepherd breed is one that many owners gravitate towards. The adorable wiggly backend of an excited Aussie is hard to resist, but it very clearly comes at a cost. It is crucial that you take away from this article that no opinions have been expressed, but rather, the facts of this breed’s past and current history have been conveyed with truth and clarity. Dogs deserve unconditional love and the best chance at a happy and healthy life, and that is a stance that all people can get behind.

9 Things You Might Not Know About the Australian Shepherd – American Kennel Club

The Australian Shepherd, or Aussie for short, is one of the most popular breeds in the United States. Their boundless energy and high intelligence make them fun, entertaining, and hardworking pets and assistance dogs. Here are some interesting facts about the Australian Shepherd:

1. They are not actually Australian.

The Australian Shepherd probably came from the Basque region of Spain. Basque shepherds first took their dogs with them to Australia and then to the United States, so Americans called the dogs Australian Shepherds. The breed, as we know it today, was developed solely in the United States.

2. They gained popularity from rodeos.

American ranchers loved Australian Shepherds because they were great herders, but Aussies rose to fame among the general population because of their frequent appearances in rodeos. Not only could Aussies help herd the bulls, they could also perform tricks.

3. They’ve had many names.

Australian Shepherds have also been called Spanish Shepherds (which makes more sense, given their place of origin), Pastor Dogs, Bob-Tails (more on that later), Blue Heelers, New Mexican Shepherds, and California Shepherds.

4. Native Americans considered them sacred.

Legend has it that Native Americans called Australian Shepherds “ghost eye” and thought they were sacred. These dogs do not always have blue eyes, but pale blue, “ghostly” eyes are common among the breed.

5. They often have two different colored eyes.

The Australian Shepherd is one of a few dog breeds that commonly have two different colored eyes, called heterochromia. Aussies might have any combination of brown, blue, hazel, amber, or green eyes. Some Aussies even display more than one color within the same eye.

6. Many have naturally short tails.

In addition to having a genetic predisposition for heterochromia, Aussies have a one-in-five chance of being born with a naturally bobbed tail,. Ranchers purposely bred Aussies that had these naturally short tails because they are safer when it comes to herding.

7. Aussies are serious shedders.

Some owners will claim that their Aussie only sheds twice a year…for six months at a time.

8. Aussies have many jobs.

In addition to being herding dogs, Australian Shepherds serve as Seeing Eye dogs, hearing dogs, drug sniffing dogs, and search and rescue dogs. Because of their high intelligence, Aussies are well suited to do a wide variety of jobs.

9. One Aussie was a Frisbee champion.

An Australian Shepherd, named Hyper Hank, rose to fame for his Frisbee skills in the 1970s. Hank and his owner, Eldon McIntire, dominated canine Frisbee competitions, and they even got to perform at the Super Bowl and play with the Carter family at the White House.

Impression dogs. Our Dogs. Most beautiful dogs in the world

Our Mini Aussies ( Miniature American Shepherds & Miniature Australian Shepherds)

We are one of very few breeders in the country who does NOT dock tails on our mini Aussies! We have decided to go against the grain with our future litters of mini ausssies and… WE DO NOT DOCK TAILS on ANY of our mini aussie puppies! After much research and consideration, we have decide to allow our puppies to keep their natural long tails. For more information about our decision please scroll to the bottom of the page. ​

Our Boys

Our Girls

These are our own personal dogs and family members. We chose our dogs because they were ideal matches for our family’s personalities, lifestyles, and best suited to us as pets. Each dog is not necessarily bred every year, so available puppies are somewhat limited. However, if you are fortunate enough to own one of our puppies, we gaurantee they will leave an amazing impression on your life! We don’t have a kennel! …So how do we have so many dogs?? Not all of our dogs live with us all the time, many of them live in Foster homes (sometimes known as guardian homes) with our friends or family who live nearby. For more info on our foster homes please scroll down to the bottom of the page. ​ ​ ​

Cooper

Ember

Dallas

Flash

Denver

Chloe

Sweden

Memphis

Britain

Indi

Tierah Founding mother of our breeding program. Tierah is the mother of Sibby, Ember, London & Paris. 4 daughters who will continue on her legacy. She and Cooper have produced for us the most incredible dogs, some of which have gone all over the world. They are known for their rock solid temperaments, those eyes that stare into your soul, incredible intelligence, and stunning coats & conformation. Tierah has absolutely loved being a mother and she has taught us SO much about love, patience, resilience, and joy.

Sibby Daughter of Cooper and Tierah from their “Water” litter. Sibby was the first girl we kept back for our breeding program. She bonded closely with our oldest daughter and they showed in 4-H and UKC shows in Obedience, Agility and Conformation. Sibby is very athletic, extremely intelligent and VERY devoted. She is retiring with some our extended family in Kentucky and is enjoying mountain hikes! She gets “oohs and aahs” everywhere she goes, she is so well behaved! We love that we get to visit with her from time to time.

Bria Full sister to Dallas, Bria has raised many beautiful puppies for us. Her exceptionally sweet and loving nature has been passed down through all of them, as well her love for fetch! Bria gets to enjoy a fun and relaxing retirement with her foster and now forever family. 🙂

The Tail Change After much thought and consideration we have decided that we will not be docking ANY of our puppies tails! In the past we docked the tails of our mini-Aussies mainly because it was “breed standard.” ​ WHY DOCK?? It is thought that the Aussie’s tail was originally docked because they were hard working dogs herding livestock, and their tails woud collect so much mud, burrs, briars and supposedly could be broken by cattle stepping on them, the ranchers thought it safer to dock their Aussie’s tails. Some say that Aussie’s tails were docked so the breed could be identified as an Aussie from distance. Or that maybe docking was to avoid paying taxes on them, as taxes were determined by the “tailed animals” on the farm. There are actually many theory’s as to why their tails were originally docked. Whatever the reason was in the past, there is no good reason for us to dock the tails on our Aussies any more. I feel that my responsibility is to prioritize the well being of my puppies. Cutting (essentially) a limb off them is just not in the best interest of the dog. As a trainer, I especially value the tail as a major means of communication, as well as being important for a dog’s balance in fast movement. We feel that there are enough people out there who will still love and maybe even prefer an Aussie with a long natural tail. Their tails are beautiful (I always hated having them docked). I really think people will love our Aussies WITH tails and we hope it catches on! **Miniature American Shepherds are now a FULLY recognized breed to the AKC as of July 2015! AND the breed standard for Miniature American Shepherds actually allows for undocked tails! (Although a docked tail may still be preferred in the showring, it is not considered a fault anymore) …YAY!

About the name… American or Australian? Miniature American Shepherd is a brand new name to the AKC! But they are not actually a new dog at all. The AKC/FSS (Foundational Stock Service) for a while allowed smaller Australian Shepherds to register under the new name of Miniature American Shepherd. Other registries such as the NSDR or ASDR, call them as Miniature Australian Shepherds, but just to clarify…they’ve come from the Exact same breed – the Australian Shepherd! Some of our dogs are dual registered with AKC and ASDR. ASDR calls them Mini Australian Shepherd.

AKC calls them Mini American Shepherds. Don’t get confused, they are the same dog! We just call them ALL Mini Aussies 🙂 ​

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