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Sr. Maria Caritas of the Cross, SOLT shares a reflection for the 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time. She reflects on the Gospel and encourages us to intercede for those who need prayers and are unable to pray.

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Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle B | Loyola Press

Say: We celebrate Jesus’ healing presence in our lives today. We pray for those who are ill. We ask Jesus to heal them. We share the Good News that Jesus loves …

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In his homily for 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B, Father Hanly offers beautiful insights into the story of the man who could not hear.

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Homily for 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time. Someone once asked me where I get my stories … was the case when I attended a wedding reception many years ago. I.

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Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time · Reading 1 · Responsorial Psalm · Reading 2 · Alleluia · Gospel.

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  • Author: SOLT Liturgy Prep
  • Views: 2,591 views
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  • Date Published: Sep 3, 2018
  • Video Url link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gADaTKJAxas

Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle B

First Reading

Isaiah 35:4-7a

Isaiah prophesies about God’s vindication.

Responsorial Psalm

Psalm 146:7,8-9,9-10

A song of praise to God

Second Reading

James 2:1-5

James teaches that there is to be no partiality within the Christian community.

Gospel Reading

Mark 7:31-37

Jesus restores a man’s hearing and speech.

Background on the Gospel Reading

Today we continue to hear the Gospel of Mark proclaimed. In today’s reading, Jesus heals a man who was deaf and had a speech impediment. This is a story about Jesus’ healing power, and in it we find clues about our understanding of sacrament. We are struck by the physical means used to heal the man, the use of spittle and touch. The Church continues to celebrate the sacraments using physical means. In the Sacrament of Baptism, water and oil are used to show the power of the Holy Spirit. In the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, we are anointed with holy oil on the forehead and the hands. In the Eucharist, bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ. We are a sacramental people who believe that God’s grace is given to us through these physical signs.

Some, however, see in this Gospel an image of the proclamation of the good news of Jesus to the Gentiles. The geographic references tell us that Jesus is journeying through Gentile territory. Jesus had previously visited this region and healed a person possessed by a demon. Jesus was already famous there, which explains why people brought the deaf man to him.The story that precedes this reading in Mark’s Gospel sets the stage. Jesus encounters a Gentile, a Syrophoenician woman who asks him to heal her demon-possessed daughter. Jesus engages her in a dialogue about not feeding to dogs the food intended for children. Jesus is struck by the woman’s great faith when she replies that even dogs eat the food that falls from the table, and he heals her daughter immediately. The faith of this Greek woman compels Jesus to respond to her plea.

Mark shows that Jesus’ own mission affirms the early Church’s mission to the Gentiles. This was a significant issue to the early Christian community, which found that the good news of Jesus took root and spread quickly among the Gentiles. Yet there is an irony in the story of healing that Mark tells. Jesus gives the man the gift of speech, but then tells him not to use it. Jesus asks that the news of his healing power, which is evidence of his identity as the Messiah, not be spread. This is a recurring motif in Mark’s Gospel and is sometimes called the “messianic secret.”

Homily for 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B (Updated 2022) • Father Hanly

The Man Who Could Not Hear

Father Hanly’s homily for 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B, offers beautiful insights into the story of the man who could not hear.

Readings for Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

First Reading: Isaiah 35:4-7

Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 146:7, 8-9, 9-10

Second Reading: James 2:1-5

Gospel: Mark 7:31-37

Recording

Transcript

(Apologies, beginning of homily missing.)

… she was saying to me: “Father! Father!” And I went out and there she was and she kept pointing at her ears, you know.

And I said, “Can I help you?” And she’s pointing at her ears. And I finally said, “I think you’d better sit down.”

So I got her a chair and she was sitting there and then she takes out of her bag a little box. And in the box are two ear plugs — they looked like ear plugs, but they are really for hearing, you see.

And she grabs one. And it’s made of plastic and there’s a little space for a kind of a tiny transmitter. And she reaches in — and she’s very upset and she feels embarrassed — and she’s trying to get the transistor into the ear plug so she can put it in her ear, you see. And I was going to help her, but I’m hopeless at that — I mean I can’t even get my shoes on straight!

Anyhow, she finally got it in and she put it in her ear and she said, “Now I can hear you.”

And I was reading today’s Gospel, which is: “Jesus Healed the Deaf Man,” you see.

The deaf and dumb man was brought to Jesus and they asked that he would lay his hands upon him. And Jesus took him aside and he touched him. He put his fingers in the ear and then he put his finger on the mouth of the deaf and dumb man. And then he prayed to heaven and said, “Ephphatha!” and the man could hear and the man could talk and everyone was amazed.

Well, she looks at me and I look at her and I say, “This is happening before my very eyes.”

Anyhow, she talked to me and she said, “You know, I really don’t like being deaf. I can hear a little bit, but hardly at all now, and I hope I didn’t intrude on you.”

And I said, “No, I know how you feel, because I’m getting hard of hearing also.”

So we began to talk about that and she said, “Well,” she said, “you know, I don’t know why God …

“I was very angry with God for many, many years, because I was losing my hearing and that. But now I feel, well, there must be His purpose and His meaning, and so I’m no longer angry at Him and I try to do my best.”

And I said, “Do you feel like people are staring at you all the time?”

And she said, “Yes, because, you see, unless I’ve got my ear plugs in, I don’t know what they’re saying. And I’m afraid to say anything for fear I might say the wrong thing and, if I say the wrong thing, they’ll think I’m crazy and they’ll call the police or something.”

And I said, “Yeah, I have that feeling sometimes, more and more now I am not hearing and I have to say, ‘Would you repeat that please?’”

And it’s very embarrassing. Because there was a time when you had great confidence in company and, all of a sudden, just not being able to hear clearly and you begin to fake it a little bit.

I would say what I do is I say, “Pardon me, would you repeat it?” and, when they repeat it and I still don’t get it, I say, “Thank you!” and smile as if I did, you see.

Anyhow, I was telling her this story that helped me. The story was when I was in Wah Fu Chuen, Chi Fu Fa Yuen, in Yu Chun Keung, I was in charge of Yu Chun Keung Memorial College and the school there.

I was there for about a few weeks and I said to one of the teachers, I said, “You know, Edward is amazing,” this one man, “he looks happy all the time.

“The rest of us look glum and we’ve got all kinds of pressures and we’re running here and there and we’re doing the school work and we’re preparing our lessons — and he walks around smiling all the time, you see.”

And she says, “Yes. He’s deaf.” (Congregation laughs.)

And I said, “That’s it. In Hong Kong, blessed are the deaf because they have quiet and peace!” (Congregation laughs.)

So she laughed — she really laughed out loud — and it kind of let her relax and she said, “How old are you?”

And I said, “Well, I’m seventy-seven.”

And she said, “Well, I’m your little sister, because I’m only seventy-five.” (Congregation laughs.)

We talked for a bit of time and it was really nice. And she talked about her being much, much, much more hard of hearing than me and the difficulties, but you could manage well.

And then she said, “I’ll always remember your story, because, every time I get mad at God for making me deaf, I’ll say to myself, ‘Well there are certain advantages, you know. If you’re deaf, you miss an awful lot of nonsense in your life!’”

Why do I say that?

Because Mark is talking about deaf people, you see. Mark is going to tell the story of how Jesus heals the deaf.

But the funny thing about Mark is he’s very tricky. He’s not talking about deaf people at all. He’s talking about people who don’t listen, who don’t hear. There’s a difference between a deaf person who cannot hear and a person who doesn’t listen and doesn’t hear.

And, all of a sudden, I began to realise that me and this lady were talking to each other and listening to each other very intently, because both of us were struggling with the same problem.

Jesus, the way he treats the deaf man is quite lovely.

He doesn’t put the poor man in the front of this crowd that brought him — and, of course, they want to see the miracle and jump up and down, you know, and maybe sell tickets for the next one or whatever it is.

He knows that the man is embarrassed. He can’t talk. He doesn’t know what’s going on. He doesn’t know whether they are laughing at him or whether he is welcome. And he is confused. And so Jesus leads him aside, away from the crowd.

And then the next thing he does is quite lovely. The next thing he does is he tells him what he is going to do for him. But he knows the man can’t hear, so he touches his ears and he puts his finger on his mouth, and the man realises that the healer is going to heal him.

And then, when the man is healed, he says to him, “Now, don’t tell anybody because they’re looking for miracles, but what I have given you is ears to hear — ears to hear and a mouth to praise.” And he sends him off, as he usually did, to the Temple of Jerusalem, where he could give thanks for his healing.

And then it dawned on me that what Mark is also telling us. It’s a liturgy, you see. It’s a liturgy, you notice?

Jesus takes him aside, puts his fingers in his ears, puts his finger on his lips, and then he says — prays over him and says — “Ephphatha!” which means “Be opened!” And the man’s ears opened and he could speak. This…

What’s the difference between a healing and a liturgy?

Well, a good example would be if you have a young man and he wants to marry a young woman.

And they’re sitting in her living room and he says to her, “I love you, Mary, I really love you.”

That’s one thing.

But if he comes to St Margaret’s Church and she’s wearing a long gown and there’s solemn music from Mozart and there’s a choir singing. And the books are read and the readings are read and they are full of what it means to love and care. And then they come together and they say, “Mary, I ask you to be my wife. I promise to be true to you, in good times and in bad, in sickness and in health. I will love you and honour you all the days of my life.”

Now that’s liturgy.

The difference between liturgy and passing remarks is that liturgy is forever.

When Mark talks about the man born who was deaf and he could not speak, he’s talking about us.

He is talking about us in this way: he is saying, “I’m not interested in the sounds you hear with your ears and what you say with your mouth. I’m interested in whether the sounds you hear in your ears are listened to by your heart and whether the words of praise that come forth from you always come from your heart.”

And this is why, when we baptise a little child — after the baptism and after the lighted candle, the Light of the World, is given to the godparents, and after this — the priest picks up the child and he touches the ears and he touches the mouth and he says the prayer, “My little child, may God soon open your ears to hear His word and open your mouth that you might give Him praise.”

And that means for always.

We are all blind. We are all deaf. We are all in need of God’s healing.

But the healing that God wants for us is not to solve our eye problems or our ear problems. He wants us to solve the problems of the heart.

So what we see, we see the glory that God has given us to see the world as He sees it.

And when we hear, He gives us the glory of His name that we might hear all the wonders of the Word of God as it comes to us and He gives us a mouth to sing His praise.

This is what Mark is saying. He’s saying we are a community of people and we should be listening to each other, not with our ears, but with our hearts. And we should be praising each other, not with our mouth, but with our heart as well.

And so this very short little Gospel is said every time a child is baptised.

And it will live forever in the liturgy of the Church, because it is teaching us a fundamental truth: you must speak with your heart, hear with your heart, love with your heart, and then you will understand that God is with us.

Homily For 23rd Sunday Of Ordinary Time, Year B

Our God Does All Things Well

Readings: 1st: Is 35, 4-7; Ps: 145; 2nd: Jam 2, 1-5; Gos: Mk 7, 31-37

This brief reflection was written by Rev. Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a Member of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost Fathers and Brothers (Spiritans). He is currently working with the Spiritan International Group of Puerto Rico & Dominican Republic. He is the Administrator of Parroquia La Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. For more details and comments contact him on: [email protected], [email protected]

Today, the twenty third Sunday of ordinary time, we celebrate Christ our Savior who makes no distinction between classes of people. He lifts us up and makes us all rich in faith. We praise the Lord who heals and restores the afflicted.

Our first reading is a message of hope for the oppressed people of God and for all of us who need His saving help. It is a message of restoration from the Lord who neither shows favoritism nor likes oppression. Above all, it is a message of hope from a loving Father who cares for all his children. He says to us today: “Courage do not be afraid! Look your God is coming…”

In our second reading today, James frowns at the sin of despising the poor, in favor of the rich. His words equally apply to all types of prejudices in our families, churches and society. So, to favor some people and disregard others based on their race, economic, social or religious background is a terrible evil against God and man.

This evil afflicted the early church. This was why seven deacons were elected to avoid favoritism in the distribution of resources in Acts 6. The message of James is still very relevant to all of us today. This is because today, in our families, communities, churches, states, and indeed all over the world, people still suffer terrible injustice because of who they are. They Still suffer because of where they come from and the color of their skin.

Many innocent, poor and good people are not valued because of their economic, social, political, religious and cultural status. It is sad to know that in this century, favoritism, discrimination and, racism still plagues our society. This should not be so for us as Christians. Where and whenever they exist, they are signs that we do not yet know or understand God and his ways. Their roots are in these twin vices called: pride and selfishness.

Pride makes one think he is better than the other or, that he is superior while others are inferior. So, they should be treated differently. Selfishness makes one think only about one’s well being and so, ignores the sufferings and needs of others. These twin vices are the forces behind the theory of “Might is Right,” a negative expression of power.

In today’s gospel, “Jesus went from one town to the other doing good.” We were not told that he healed only the poor or the rich. Rather, his blessings touched and transformed the poor and the rich, the good and the bad, the sinner and the righteous, the beautiful and the ugly. He did not discriminate or show favoritism. Instead, he identified with all classes of people.

Christ visited and eat with Zacchaeus the tax collector (Lk 19 1-10). He called, and transformed Levi the tax collector and transformed him into saint Matthew, the great evangelist (Mt 9: 9-13). He healed the daughter of Jairus, the rich Roman centurion (Mk 5: 21-43). Against Jewish tradition, He spoke with a poor and sinful Samaritan woman. He transformed her life and brought her to faith (Lk 4:1 42). Also, He healed many poor, blind, lame, deaf and dumb people. In deed: “He did all things well” without favoritism.

Finally, let us emulate Jesus by aiming at being good to all without discrimination favoritism. We must make ourselves instrument to help others rise without minding their status. We should be motivated by the fact that, “God created all of us in his own image and likeness” (Gen 2, 27). Only through this can we truly sing with the psalmist: “My soul give praise to the Lord.”

Peace be with you!

Maranatha!

Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Again Jesus left the district of Tyre

and went by way of Sidon to the Sea of Galilee,

into the district of the Decapolis.

And people brought to him a deaf man who had a speech impediment

and begged him to lay his hand on him.

He took him off by himself away from the crowd.

He put his finger into the man’s ears

and, spitting, touched his tongue;

then he looked up to heaven and groaned, and said to him,

“Ephphatha!”— that is, “Be opened!” —

And immediately the man’s ears were opened,

his speech impediment was removed,

and he spoke plainly.

He ordered them not to tell anyone.

But the more he ordered them not to,

the more they proclaimed it.

They were exceedingly astonished and they said,

“He has done all things well.

He makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.”

Catholic Sunday Mass Readings for September 5 2021, Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B – Sunday Homily

Sunday Mass Readings for September 5 2021: Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B – Lectionary: 128

Sunday Mass Readings for September 5 2021, Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B 1st Reading Isaiah 35:4-7A Responsorial Psalm Psalms 146:6-7, 8-9, 9-10 2nd Reading James 2:1-5 Alleluia Matthew 4:23 Gospel Mark 7:31-37

Catholic Sunday Readings for September 5 2021, Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

1st Reading – Isaiah 35:4-7A

Thus says the LORD:

4 Say to those whose hearts are frightened: Be strong, fear not! Here is your God, he comes with vindication; with divine recompense he comes to save you.

5 Then will the eyes of the blind be opened, the ears of the deaf be cleared;

6 then will the lame leap like a stag, then the tongue of the mute will sing. Streams will burst forth in the desert, and rivers in the steppe.

7 The burning sands will become pools, and the thirsty ground, springs of water.

R. (1b) Praise the Lord, my soul!

or:

R. Alleluia.

6 The God of Jacob keeps faith forever,

7 secures justice for the oppressed,

gives food to the hungry.

The LORD sets captives free.

R. Praise the Lord, my soul!

or:

R. Alleluia.

8 The LORD gives sight to the blind;

the LORD raises up those who were bowed down.

The LORD loves the just;

9A the LORD protects strangers.

R. Praise the Lord, my soul!

or:

R. Alleluia.

9B The fatherless and the widow the LORD sustains,

but the way of the wicked he thwarts.

10 The LORD shall reign forever;

your God, O Zion, through all generations. Alleluia.

R. Praise the Lord, my soul!

or:

R. Alleluia.

2nd Reading – James 2:1-5

1 My brothers and sisters, show no partiality as you adhere to the faith in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ.

2 For if a man with gold rings and fine clothes comes into your assembly, and a poor person in shabby clothes also comes in,

3 and you pay attention to the one wearing the fine clothes and say, “Sit here, please, ” while you say to the poor one, “Stand there, ” or “Sit at my feet, ”

4 have you not made distinctions among yourselves and become judges with evil designs?

5 Listen, my beloved brothers and sisters. Did not God choose those who are poor in the world to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom that he promised to those who love him?

Alleluia – CF. Matthew 4:23

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

23 Jesus proclaimed the Gospel of the kingdom

and cured every disease among the people.

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Special Healing Prayers to pray for sick family members, friends and loved ones

Healing Prayer

Gospel – Mark 7:31-37

31 Again Jesus left the district of Tyre and went by way of Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, into the district of the Decapolis.

32 And people brought to him a deaf man who had a speech impediment and begged him to lay his hand on him.

33 He took him off by himself away from the crowd. He put his finger into the man’s ears and, spitting, touched his tongue;

34 then he looked up to heaven and groaned, and said to him, “Ephphatha!” – that is, “Be opened!”

35 And immediately the man’s ears were opened, his speech impediment was removed, and he spoke plainly.

36 He ordered them not to tell anyone. But the more he ordered them not to,

the more they proclaimed it.

37 They were exceedingly astonished and they said, “He has done all things well. He makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.”

Tomorrow’s Catholic Daily Readings for September 6 2021, Monday of the Twenty‑third week in Ordinary Time

Sunday Mass Readings Homily – September 5 2021, Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Today’s September 5 2021 Catholic Sunday Readings Homily Theme: Jesus Looked up to Heaven and Said to Him, “Ephphatha!” (that is, “Be opened!”) – Mark 7:31-37

Saint of the Day for September 5 2021 – Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta

Other Saints whose feast day is September 5

Catholic Saint Feast Days in September

Catholic Saint Feast Days from January to December

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23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time Year B

This homily from Bishop Barron for the 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time Year B focuses on how we can be deaf to the Word of God. We need Jesus to do this for us also!

Do you listen to the voices of the outside world instead of hearing our Lord speaking? Ask Jesus to open your ears to His voice.

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